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Canadiana (2 Viewers)

EmuJenkins

Senior Member
For any Canucks out there, what do you think the classic Canadian novel is? It's tough to choose with a nation that is so young. I actually can't think of an old classic that is good...
Some old books include:

Susanna Moodie- Roughing it in the Bush (a tedious first hand account from the view of a pioneer woman)

Ralph Conner- The Man from Glengarry (know nothing about)

Ernest Buckler- The Mountain an the Valley (a young writer who searches for a story idea)

Mordecai Richler- The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz (not old, but so Canadian)

Stephen Leacock- Sunshine Sketches of a Small Town (represents the Canadian people nicely, humourous)

Charles G.D. Roberts- The Last Barrier (He's called the Father of Can. Lit, but I can't think of one solid title he has.)

Any choices? Other options? Canadians? UnCanadians who read CanLit?
 

WordBeast

Senior Member
I would add to that list:

2 books by Hugh MacLennan--Two Solitudes, the definitive novel about the divisions between English and French Canada---and Barometer Rising, the true story about the greatest man-made explosion in history before Hiroshima, the Halifax explosion of 1917.

I don't know if they fall into the category of classic, but I would also include Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale and Alias Grace.
 

EmuJenkins

Senior Member
How could I forget Hugh... I'd say that Atwood is pretty much considered a classical Canadian author, is she stopped writing...
 

strangedaze

Senior Member
Bwa? Please don't tell me we've forgotten about Sinclair Ross, about whom a heralded biography has recently been written!

And I suppose we could put our friend Mordecai Richler in the 'classic Canadiana' deprtment, since he did bite the big one and because Canada's not that old.

Oh, and Margaret Laurence.
 

EmuJenkins

Senior Member
Damn, I forgot Pierre Berton... he's one of the most important.
Also, Leonard Cohen soon enough (part of the Montreal Jewish Mafia).
 

strangedaze

Senior Member
Despite lewdness, I could never get a handle on Lenny's fiction. Tried my hand at Beautiful Losers earlier this year but found it wrought with too much abstraction for my tastes.

Who's Pierre Berton?

What about Hubert Aquin?
 

kintaris

Senior Member
I think we should have an Organised Canadians of the World group in the Lounge as well - because you seem to be around everywhere and i for one know so little about your country.

I'm off to find some CanLit...sounds like a questionable light beer...

kintaris
 

valeca

Patron
W. O. Mitchell -Who Has Seen the Wind (1947)

And yes, we Canadians are everywhere. We're quietly taking over.
 

kintaris

Senior Member
Ah well, we Brits had a good run. Canada sounds nice and it doesn't get bombed so much. Feel free to continue your peaceful domination.

kintaris
 

Viper9

Member
Pierre Berton is tops for nonfiction, no doubt. He writes the most engrossing histories ever (his book on the great depression is my fave).

For nonfiction, I'd have to go with Mordecai Richler, whose Solomon Gursky Was Here has some of the richest characters in all of literature.
 
J

Jonesy

Yup Canadians are taking over. I actually live around the corner from Atwood, and well I don't like her very much. She is kinda stuck up, or I guess she could also just be very private...na shes stuck up.
 

EmuJenkins

Senior Member
Nobody's mentioned Gabrielle Roy. I think the Tin Flute is definately on the list. Maybe some Robertson Davies... I think strangedayz may have said that.

The other big Canadian post is Oh Canada! in the debate or lounge... cant remember which. Im sure most of you have already been.
 

TsuTseQ

Senior Member
What about Wacousta, supposedly the first Canadian novel? If it was good enough for Canlit, it's good enough for... not it's not. It's awful and noone should ever read it.

What about Farley Mowat?
 
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