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Books that everyone should read (1 Viewer)

Megan Pearson

Senior Member
'Till We Have Faces, by C.S. Lewis. Its central theme asks, what is love? It is one of the most profoundly captivating novels I have ever read.
Indian Creek Chronicles, by Peter Fromm. It has that raw, intimate, and almost mystical feeling of 'what is like' of surviving a winter alone in the wilderness.
White Fang, by Jack London. The metaphorical nature of the wolf-dog's transformation always catches me in the gut. It is perhaps one of the most emotionally moving stories of loss and redemption I have yet read; I am always moved to tears by the end. And unlike the many pro-animal-rights reviews I've read through the years, I'm convinced his anthropomorphic stories are never about animals. It's about people.
Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte
& anything by Jane Austen.
 

Olly Buckle

Mentor
Patron
White Fang, by Jack London.
I am told that London got caught up in the Alaskan gold rush and ended up broke and stranded. He wrote Call of the wild and White fang to raise the money to get him out. That worked.

Rudyard Kipling is one of my favourite authors, partly for his amazing range, but his children's books, 'Kim' and the two books of historical tales 'Puck of Pook's hill' and 'Rewards and fairies' were read to me as a child and have been read since. They don't lose for being an adult like many children's books do, and I recently read a book which suggests that Kim is very largely based in fact, a lot of the characters can be historically identified.
 

Megan Pearson

Senior Member
I am told that London got caught up in the Alaskan gold rush and ended up broke and stranded. He wrote Call of the wild and White fang to raise the money to get him out. That worked.
Yes! I've similarly heard he hated writing dog stories, but that was what was selling. So he'd sit down and write vigorously for ten minutes, drink (coffee? something else? There might have been a cigarette involved in the routine, too. It's been a while since I heard about this.) And then plunge in for another ten minutes of furious writing. Not what I'd call a happily engaged writer--more like a madman in his approach. If that's what it takes to be a 'writer', then I'm not sure I have what it takes! :)

Rudyard Kipling is one of my favourite authors, partly for his amazing range, but his children's books, 'Kim' and the two books of historical tales 'Puck of Pook's hill' and 'Rewards and fairies' were read to me as a child and have been read since. They don't lose for being an adult like many children's books do, and I recently read a book which suggests that Kim is very largely based in fact, a lot of the characters can be historically identified.
That is fascinating. Thanks for sharing!
 
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