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Books about writing... (1 Viewer)

Kittie

Member
I feel like reading books about writing is a guilty pleasure. I read them and I begin to think that I shouldn't simply because all the stuff I have inside me that makes me a writer is there anyway. And the authors of the book tend to tell me the same thing. It's nothing I NEED.

Anyway, I've read two books on writing over the past few months. The first was "On Writing" by Stephen King. And the other was "Bird by Bird" by Anne Lamott.

And I realized something. It's not really the 'tips and tricks' that make these books enjoyable for me... but rather the familiarity I feel with the stories about writing. And feeling like I'm not alone. And that I'm Okay... in spite of myself.

Anyone else read books about writing? How does it make you feel? What do you like or hate about these books?
 

Melter

Member
I think anything that gets you fired up and re-energised can't be all bad. I tend to agree that it's not that you're learning anything new from these books but you're sparking your enthusiasm for the subject (whatever it might be). Some of us just need to work this way. I say go ahead and indulge yourself. :)
 
From an inside source, meaning someone that works with Stephen King's publsiher, claims that King never wrote the second have of his book "On Writing," which actually concentrated on the writing, but it was actually either his editor or the publisher himself.

Ciao,

~The Lord~
 
T

type

I'll say this, though, that book has a lot of good practical advice.

Another book that I have found extremely helpful is "Creativity Rules!" by John Vorhaus, who practically walks his readers through creating a story line. He briefly explains a concept, follows it up with an example and presents a related exercise. If you do the exercises in order, you are more likely to wind up with something worth working on.
 
S

StumpJumper

Both of those are great books...even for someone who doesn't even write.

I especially enjoyed Bird by Bird. Anne Lamott's philosophy of being persistant about writing every singe day without being too hard on yourself about the quality of your first drafts was somewhat of a revelation to me as a beginning writer.

I've been meaning to read her novels too...



Kittie said:
I feel like reading books about writing is a guilty pleasure. I read them and I begin to think that I shouldn't simply because all the stuff I have inside me that makes me a writer is there anyway. And the authors of the book tend to tell me the same thing. It's nothing I NEED.

Anyway, I've read two books on writing over the past few months. The first was "On Writing" by Stephen King. And the other was "Bird by Bird" by Anne Lamott.

And I realized something. It's not really the 'tips and tricks' that make these books enjoyable for me... but rather the familiarity I feel with the stories about writing. And feeling like I'm not alone. And that I'm Okay... in spite of myself.

Anyone else read books about writing? How does it make you feel? What do you like or hate about these books?
 

DL Ferguson

Senior Member
Lord Alexandre said:
From an inside source, meaning someone that works with Stephen King's publsiher, claims that King never wrote the second have of his book "On Writing," which actually concentrated on the writing, but it was actually either his editor or the publisher himself.

Ciao,

~The Lord~

Probably the same 'inside source' who has also said for years that some of King's books were actually written by his wife, Tabitha King and published under his name. I tend to take these 'inside sources' stories with a grain of salt, myself :D
 

Pawn

Patron
Personally, I think creativity is at it's best when 'unbound'. Rules are dangerous things, which I like to avoid. They inspire closed thinking, which can have the effect of reducing creativity, or, more positively, channeling and focusing it. I sometimes make up my own rules, to help me do something. Limitations are helpful, at times. I wouldn't read a book about writing mind you.. I thought the point that was made earlier, about how nice it is to know that others are doing the same thing, had some validity. Writing is a very solitary occupation; it's always nice to feel in good company, and that the problems you face are being faced by us all. But then, we have this forum, so we can't complain. :p
 
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