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Bizarre content (1 Viewer)

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Bizarreness is a special skill, I feel, because there's a tender balance between arresting, disorienting, or delightful strangeness and an incomprehensible mess. The reader has to have some kind of tie or link that pulls them into the story, something that anchors them:

- In Alice In Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass, it's Alice, of course, the relatively ordinary girl among all the weirdness.
- In A Voyage to Arcturus, it's the philosophic underpinnings of each weird place (even if you don't know what they are, they provide a certain poetic logic).
- In The Man Who Was Thursday, both the relatable (but still kind of weird, I don't think G. K. Chesterton has ever written a normal male character) protagonist and philosophic ideas create an anchor in the wild, rollicking, ever-changing ride.
- In xXx's content, it's the consistent voice and poetic progression/repeated motifs (see his Grand Fiction Challenge entry, "scripting the nodes" for a good example).

When I find bizarre content I enjoy, it's not so much the amount of weirdness (how would you even measure that, anyways?), but the atmosphere, the 'feel.'
 

escorial

WF Veterans
I really enjoy it..Leanora Carrington a...the hearing trumpet...or down below..all her short stories are weird but enjoyable...another book is Andre Bretons...Nadja....
 

Theglasshouse

WF Veterans
Sure weird fiction is a legitimate genre. On wikipedia you can probably find a decent definition but would need examples but arrowinthebowofthelord gave some.
 
Sure weird fiction is a legitimate genre. On wikipedia you can probably find a decent definition but would need examples but arrowinthebowofthelord gave some.

I think Weird Fiction (the genre) and fiction that's weird are two different things. Weird Fiction is like Machen and Lovecraft, right? Whereas just plain weird stuff is more like surreal, or could be within multiple genres. Like The Man Who Was Thursday is kind of surrealist detective fiction and A Voyage to Arcturus is scifi.
 

luckyscars

WF Veterans
In terms of genre, Bizarro fiction is quite distinct from Weird fiction. They seem similar on paper but they have very different audiences in practice.

They are both speculative, somewhat related to horror/SF/fantasy, but Weird Fiction tends to be pretty literary, often serious, frequently dark. Weird fiction tends to be about reinterpreting or reimagining folklore, myth, scientific theories, etc. to create something that may well be 'bizarre' (the adjective) but is not 'Bizarre' (the genre).

'Bizarre' as a genre is about weird stuff too, but in Bizarro the weirdness is the primary purpose of the piece and so it tends to be more graphic and extreme. There are some exceptions and crossovers of course, but Bizarre Fiction is typically lower brow and more humorous than Weird Fiction. As a result, Bizarro tends to be more 'underground'.

Weird fiction: A hideous, tentacled creature descends from outer space to dominate a terrified Aztec society.
Bizarro fiction: A hideous, tentacled creature crawls from a nun's anus to open a modern American-style grocery store serving foods made from human flesh from the bodies of the slaughtered Aztecs.

Similar core concept, different reading material. Weird fiction probably has more of a mainstream appeal these days. Bizarro's market is undoubtedly tiny, but probably quite committed to the cause...
 

Phil Istine

WF Veterans
Although I haven't looked for a while, I quite like The Far Side Gallery, which are collections of cartoons and, if needed, captions. I have constructed the occasional flash fiction piece or poem around such pictures.
 
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