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  1. #11
    Member TJ Cruse's Avatar
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    I agree with Sam that Clear and Present Danger is probably Clancy's best (although my personal favorite is Red Storm Rising).

    But, how do you say a book is a must read? It depends on why you're reading I guess.

    If we're talking about the classics, I'd say include The Brothers Karamazov by Dostoevsky. It was a very prophetic book for its time with regard to the influence and consequences of humanism in Europe and in Russia particularly (this was pre-USSR).

    Tolkien's LOTR was a great good vs evil story (sorry Sam).

    I also agree that McMurtry's Lonesome Dove was great. He's awesome if you've never read him.

    The Stand by Stephen King
    A Farewell to Arms by Hemingway

    Sitting here thinking about it, there are plenty of others but I'll stop here.

    TJ

  2. #12
    Member buyjupiter03's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TJ Cruse View Post
    Tolkien's LOTR was a great good vs evil story (sorry Sam).

    I also agree that McMurtry's Lonesome Dove was great. He's awesome if you've never read him.
    I don't cry when a book ends very often, but with those two I absolutely bawled. I didn't want the books to end. I'd invested a lot of time into those characters and kinda felt like they were friends. Oh, I hate to be predictable and push a book everyone and their mother knows about, but Tuesdays With Morrie is incredible. I bawled at the end of that one too, even though I knew what was coming. Sheesh, it sounds like I cry a lot, but I don't really.

    (I read a lot of fantasy/sf, and since I know quite a few people on here don't care for it I had a hard time coming up with "must reads".)
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  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by TJ Cruse View Post
    I agree with Sam that Clear and Present Danger is probably Clancy's best (although my personal favorite is Red Storm Rising).

    But, how do you say a book is a must read? It depends on why you're reading I guess.

    If we're talking about the classics, I'd say include The Brothers Karamazov by Dostoevsky. It was a very prophetic book for its time with regard to the influence and consequences of humanism in Europe and in Russia particularly (this was pre-USSR).

    Tolkien's LOTR was a great good vs evil story (sorry Sam).

    I also agree that McMurtry's Lonesome Dove was great. He's awesome if you've never read him.

    The Stand by Stephen King
    A Farewell to Arms by Hemingway

    Sitting here thinking about it, there are plenty of others but I'll stop here.

    TJ
    No need to apologise, TJ. Your opinion is your opinion. Mine is mine. Everyone doesn't like the same thing. For example: you say King's The Stand is a must read. I say it's about a thousand pages too long. I got eight-hundred pages into it and lost the will to live. The opening five-hundred pages are brilliant, but the middle dies a horrible death - and I don't even know what the ending is.

    Red Storm Rising wouldn't be one of my favourite Clancy books, but it's still regarded as one of his best. I think everyone should read at least one of the series of books about Jack Ryan. I think it's safe to say they are revolutionary.

    Sam.
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  4. #14
    I would say LOTR is a must-read, even though I hate reading it. I love the story, but I hate the writing. But hey, that's what movies are for.

    I would say Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury is a must-read. I've read it something like seven times, and I still adore it.

    Also, The Blind Assassin by Margaret Atwood. I've only read it twice (but the first time was only about a year ago). I think it's actually on that list of 1001 one books you need to read before you die.

    I've seen the movie American Psycho but was so uninterested in it that I never bothered about the book. I'll assume the book is better, but, meh.

    If I had to list one more, I would say If Nobody Speaks of Remarkable Things by Jon McGregor.
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  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by TJ Cruse View Post
    I agree with Sam that Clear and Present Danger is probably Clancy's best (although my personal favorite is Red Storm Rising).
    Ha, someone agrees with me! I loved Red Storm Rising too, but I wouldn't suggest it either. Defiantly, an acquired taste.

    I'm going to suggest anything by Kurt Vonnegut (master of satire) and one that I don't think anybody has read: The Baroque Cycle by Neal Stephenson

    Now I'm going to explain this one because I can't even understand it myself. It's a series of three books (about 700 pages each) set in the late 1600s. Now the first book Quicksilver is hard to get into (because the Mr. Stephenson thought it would be smart to get smart at the start of the book by centering most of the narrative on scientific principles) but even when it does dabble into Issac Newton it is still good.

    Why? Because at the end of the series it feels like you have known all the characters for most of your life and they evolve from characters into real people; I can't say that for any other book I've ever read.
    Read.
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  6. #16
    Member TJ Cruse's Avatar
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    and one that I don't think anybody has read: The Baroque Cycle by Neal Stephenson

    I loved Snow Crash and The Cryptonomicon but I haven't started the Baroque Cycle. The thought of committing to three LONG books is a little daunting. But, many people liked it.

    Something Wicked This Way Comes by Bradbury is one I've been meaning to read forever. Thanks for reminding me!

  7. #17
    Desert Solitaire by Edward Abbey
    Ceremony by L.M. Silko
    Great Expectations by Dickens
    A Scanner Darkly
    by Phillip K. Dick
    Crime and Punishment by Dostoevsky (only because I actually did)
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  8. #18
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    Could I suggest Sebastian Faulks book 'Birdsong'. A deeply disturbing account of life in the First World War. On a chirpier note you might also want to look at AJ Cronin's 'The Citadel' or RF Delderfield's 'A Horseman Riding by'

  9. #19
    Tortilla Flat by John Steinbeck is a great, humorous, and short novel. I'd say it was a must read.
    Alongside some of Arthur C Clarke's short stories, which are excellent for pieces so short, well constructed, with great plot twists, as well as being inspiring.
    And "Nothing's Changed" by Tatamkhulu Afrika. It's a poem, so it doesn't actually count, but its better than almost anything else I've ever read. It should be compulsory reading for poets.
    Only story on the forum so far: Hidden Content
    It's sci-fi, and very short.

  10. #20
    Member geminye's Avatar
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    Watership Down, Frankenstein, The Trial (Vonnegut), to name a few
    Suffer the little children...

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