Different Ways to Say "Said"


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Thread: Different Ways to Say "Said"

  1. #1
    Yrael
    Guest

    Different Ways to Say "Said"

    In writing, there often comes the trouble of replacing the word "said" with something to convey more feeling or emotion, or just to avoid repetition of the same word. So for all the writers I offer a list of numerous ways to say "said" in your writing.

    A

    announced
    awed
    accused
    assured
    apologized
    addressed
    asked
    advised
    answered
    added
    agreed
    argued
    assisted
    affirmed
    acknowledged
    applauded
    advocated

    B

    belched
    beseeched
    boomed
    bellowed
    bowed
    boasted
    began
    begged
    beamed
    butted-in
    bantered

    C


    contested
    countered
    croaked
    consoled
    chorused
    complained
    corrected
    championed
    cheered
    cried
    complemented
    calculated
    cackled
    cautioned
    continued
    commented
    conceded
    complained

    D

    declared
    drawled
    dribbled
    dismissed
    demanded
    denied
    decided

    E

    eased
    egged
    exclaimed
    excused
    encouraged
    enthused
    ejaculated
    effervesced
    enticed
    echoed

    F

    frowned
    finished
    fidgeted
    fumbled
    fumed

    G

    greeted
    grinned
    gulped
    grumbled
    groaned
    giggled
    gasped
    glowered
    gurgled
    gleamed
    guessed
    guffawed
    gawped

    H

    hissed
    hoped
    hailed
    humored
    hesitated
    hollered

    I

    indicated
    inquired
    informed
    interrupted
    insisted
    instructed

    L

    laughed
    lisped
    lumbered

    M

    muttered
    moaned
    mumbled
    maintained
    motioned
    murmured
    mentioned

    N

    nodded
    noticed

    O

    offered
    observed
    objected
    oscillated

    P

    panted
    pondered
    panicked
    puzzled
    protested
    pressed
    piped up
    proffered
    pleaded
    pardoned
    postulated
    proclaimed

    Q

    questioned

    R

    rambled
    returned
    repeated
    responded
    ranted
    raved
    relented
    rescinded
    released
    requested

    S

    slurped
    sneered
    slurred
    smirked
    snorted
    stared
    smiled
    spoke
    stormed
    sang
    shouted
    screamed
    squealed
    scolded
    shuddered
    sighed
    smarted
    stated
    suggested
    spluttered
    snapped
    snarled
    stressed
    shrilled
    stammered
    screeched
    summarized
    shuffled
    sobbed
    sniffed
    shrieked
    swayed

    T

    tutted
    threatened
    teased
    tittered
    taunted

    U

    urged
    ushered
    uttered

    V

    ventured
    vacillated

    W

    wondered
    winked
    worried
    whinged
    whined
    wittered
    warned
    whispered
    winced
    waved
    wailed

    Y

    yelled
    yodeled

  2. #2
    Member Julianne's Avatar
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    Continually avoiding the use of "said" in favor of more...um...colorful dialogue tags is the mark of a beginner. Don't do it!

    That's not to say that you shouldn't sometimes use other tags for emphasis. Just don't make it a habit.

  3. #3
    There's a kind of joke called a "Tom Swiftie", which makes fun of writing that actively avoids using the word "said".

    You might want to read this to find out more about them.

    They can be quite good fun.

  4. #4
    Hoss
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Julianne
    Continually avoiding the use of "said" in favor of more...um...colorful dialogue tags is the mark of a beginner. Don't do it!

    That's not to say that you shouldn't sometimes use other tags for emphasis. Just don't make it a habit.
    It's true. Thats one of the first things I'd learned about dialogue. You shouldn't rely on those words to better illustrate how someone is talking. You can get your point across without using them.
    I'm not eligable to talk about much of writing, especially of experience or success. I'm just relaying what I've learned.

  5. #5
    "Said."

    "Says."

    All I ever need.

    Unpack the emotion, feeling, tone, whatever. Don't put it into one word.
    Metta.

  6. #6
    Oh yeah?

    "My underwear is missing!" Sam yodeled.

  7. #7
    Or, in a more Tom Swiftly manner:

    "My underwear are gone!" bawled Tom.

  8. #8
    Member
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    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
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    Besides, 'said' is almost invisible in writing. Think of your favourite book with dialog. Did you notice excessive use of said? Now go & look at it. You will find 'said' liberaaly used - you just don't register it when you read unless the writing is crap.

    This isn't my opinion, this is tested & proven
    *Never doubt there is Truth; just doubt that you have it! - Journyman161
    *ThThe difference between stupidity and genius is there are limits to genius - Einstein
    *He can compress the most words into the smallest idea of any man I know - Abraham Lincoln

  9. #9
    RPM
    Guest
    Often times, you don't even need to use anything at all, unless of course you need to clarify who is actually speaking.

    I typically use said/says once for each character at the beginning of the conversation, and then from there keep to just the actual words.

  10. #10
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    Ireland, Cork laddie!
    Posts
    74
    great list! I hate abusing the poor word 'said'
    'Sounds shopliftingly good!' - some guy.
    Ah, the Luftwaffe! - Homer Simpson

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