How do you choose your next project? - Page 3


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Thread: How do you choose your next project?

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by SueC View Post
    I rely on inspiration generally. Anything that moves me – whether it’s a song, another story, a movie, or just a visual as I’m out and about – I can’t wait to get the words down. I rarely think of publication or what would sell, which is why it’s so hard for me write according to a plan or a “theme." I have to be moved. The first story I wrote that was published came as a result of my brother putting our dad in a nursing home. My dad was so angry he refused to speak to my brother for a long time. So I wrote this story called “Gone Visiting,” which told a story of a man named Henry (my dad’s name) who was in a nursing home and every time he wanted to visit his wife and children, he would just imagine them as they used to be when he was younger and that made him very happy. Of course, there was a lot more to the story, but it was basically up-lifting and encouraging. After it was published, I sent a copy to my dad and my brother read it to him. He liked it, but I don’t really know if he knew he was the star! I think he was too far gone by then, but that is how I write. 
    And here I was thinking all you did was wait for a tornado to sweep you off on an adventure.
    Craft / Draft / Graft And Write To Entertain.

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by TheMightyAz View Post
    And here I was thinking all you did was wait for a tornado to sweep you off on an adventure.
    I was born and raised in Chicago - but I'm up for a Kansas tornado! LOL!
    When the night has come
    And the land is dark
    And the moon is the only light we'll see
    I won't be afraid, no I won't be afraid
    Just as long as you stand by me.


  3. #23
    There is always a lot of competition in my head when I choose a new project.
    I usually have three or four in mind.
    Why I settle on a specific idea to write...I dunno.
    I guess it's the best developed, or the one I feel the strongest about/

    But that is not really a good metric to follow considering that for every book I finish there are always one or two that do not survive the first writing.
    I have lots of partial books in my files, stories that died in the womb.
    Some stories sound great, I pound out a few hundred pages...and along the way it becomes apparent that the story just doesn't have it.

    So really the question should be "How do you choose the projects that you actually finish?"

  4. #24
    I'm juggling several WiPs which I have heard you're not supposed to do. One short story, one flash fiction, and I'm fighting for my novel idea to take shape. While I think it's okay to have short stories to work on simultaneously I won't do that with a novel. Only one novel at a time is the plan.

    I have a hard time making choices.

    Laugh at me but I am trying to narrow down the novel idea from 13 possible premises currently dropped to 5. Now I'm going to do 15 minute sprints on each one and see which one seems to have the most juice.

    This is a pain in the neck. And I'm out of Irish cream for my coffee.
    What comes after the NaPo storm of poetry?
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  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Foxee View Post
    I'm juggling several WiPs which I have heard you're not supposed to do.
    Juggling implies a degree of control on part of the writer.

    No control...no problem.

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Foxee View Post
    I'm juggling several WiPs which I have heard you're not supposed to do. One short story, one flash fiction, and I'm fighting for my novel idea to take shape. While I think it's okay to have short stories to work on simultaneously I won't do that with a novel. Only one novel at a time is the plan.

    I have a hard time making choices.

    Laugh at me but I am trying to narrow down the novel idea from 13 possible premises currently dropped to 5. Now I'm going to do 15 minute sprints on each one and see which one seems to have the most juice.
    “I never get Writer’s Block because I have multiple projects on my to-do list. So when I get tired or get stuck on Project A, I simply move to Project B.”

    -- Isaac Asimov

    Anything that was OK for Asimov is OK for us.

    I started out doing that. I was stuck on my first novel, so I much later wrote three chapters (almost) on a second novel ... the one I just completed. But while it was sitting there, I started the fairy tale that's my next active project. I got a few thousand words there until it stuck. So I'm of the opinion that starting multiple projects is only worthwhile if they ever get finished! LOL

    The biggest accomplishment in my writing over the last few years is learning how to finish.

    Still, there are gaps. On this last project, in the spreadsheet I kept for my roster of "good guys" and "bad guys" (except that some of the good guys are bad guys and a few of the bad guys are good guys), I also kept a sheet where I recorded the date I started and finished each chapter. The chapters with the longest elapsed time to complete, or the longest break between ending one chapter and starting the next, are spots where I needed a good idea for what should happen next, or how it should happen.

    This makes me think if I have two manuscripts going at the same time, I can fill in those gaps happening in the "main project" by making progress on a secondary, or even tertiary, project ... and I think I'll try that out. In the original post, I discussed deciding between multiple projects I have a lot of interest in writing, so maybe that will also help slake that desire.

  7. #27
    Oh, don't worry. When it's time for me to shamelessly plug my work, you'll know.

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by vranger View Post
    “I never get Writer’s Block because I have multiple projects on my to-do list. So when I get tired or get stuck
    on Project A, I simply move to Project B.”

    -- Isaac Asimov
    I've been seeing the wisdom in that statement a lot as of late. I'm too used to stopping any and all writing when I get stuck on just one
    project, when I should be switching to another (as I am doing now) and/or brainstorming to make point form notes on any other idea I
    may have floating around in my brain.

    I just finally got back to another project after a new idea just went down the proverbial toilet. I think as writers, keeping busy with
    multiple projects keeps those creative juices flowing no matter what.

    -JJB
    ​"Strong convictions precede great actions....."

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  9. #29
    I tend to have multiple story ideas in my head or partly written down. I'm also working on a list of six reasons to abandon a project I'll put on this site. One reason I have to end a project will, is if you don't have an ending point. I've read a number of books where they seem to rush the ending. My thought is if you haven't thought of how to end a story, even if you change it later don't start. You can write down scenes of sketch out characters or locations, but until you know where to go don't start.

  10. #30
    Well I haven't given this much thought, since I am still on my first novel. But originally, my plan was to write a trilogy. My MC is a financial journalist and there are two sub MCs, one, an Olympic skier, turned hotelier, who defected from East Germany and the other, a fashion designer and the heir to a large grocery chain. They are all strong women in their own way. In my WIP the MC's POV is about 50% and the sub MCs get about 25% each of POV.

    The stories are based in reality. Fictional characters, but actual white collar crimes as the underlying plot. I had thought to keep the POV the same for each new novel. However, lately, I have been toying with the idea of alternating the POV. So each of them become the MC for one part of the trilogy. White collar crimes exist in any industry, so no limitation there. And I actually thought that this idea would be more original.

    Thoughts?
    Sometimes in the waves of change we find our new direction...
    - unknown

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