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Thread: Old Books

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by JBF View Post
    I'm weird. I doubt I'm the only one.
    Oh JBF! You are most definitely not the only one. I do that all the time - and I was thinking as I read these posts that it isn't just information I am after, it is understanding. I crave that more than anything else. And the bits of information that I pick up that never make it into a story, still color it somehow, or maybe it just gives me confidence to continue.

    And it also gives me something to talk about when there needs to be conversation, but nothing interesting is going on. As in 'did you know . . . ?" LOL!
    When the night has come
    And the land is dark
    And the moon is the only light we'll see
    I won't be afraid, no I won't be afraid
    Just as long as you stand by me.


  2. #12
    Member JBF's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SueC View Post
    And the bits of information that I pick up that never make it into a story, still color it somehow, or maybe it just gives me confidence to continue.
    This is an important bit, I think. You do the research so even of the fact doesn't make the final cut it does inform the parts that do.

    That, and it's amusing to occasionally pull a reader down the rabbit hole when they ask, "Hey, why did you..."

  3. #13
    Some time ago, I was working on a story in which the setting was the dust bowl in the U.S. in the 1930's. What I wanted to know was, how did parents discipline their children, or otherwise take care of their families during those difficult times? Did they just let the kids run amok and hope for the best? Or were they hard and tough disciplinarians? I could see valid arguments for both, considering the times, but wanted to know for sure.
    My reaction would be that it takes all sorts to make a world, and whilst it is a very human thing to want to identify a single trait or way, the world's not like that. I have been a few places and mixed with a few people and types turn up again and again, you recognise them even when you don't speak the language. Reading anthropology reinforces that. Also habitations there and then were fairly distant and people had plenty to get on with to survive. With little contact social pressures to conform to a norm would be negligible.

    They probably practiced everything from acclamation and appreciation, to beating into submission, though they probably wouldn't have called it that What do you need for your story? What do you feel like writing?
    Hidden Content

    A whole swathe of entertainment, all sorts of lengths, all sorts of stories, all with that 'Olly' twist.

  4. #14
    Wow, I forgot to paste the actual link above, didn't I? (Thank goodness for Chrome History!)

    https://family.jrank.org/pages/1252/...ng-Styles.html

  5. #15
    A lot of really great research is currently dying in nursing homes, unvisited. Maybe there are memoirs for the right time period if you can find them.

    If you're fortunate enough to have living older relatives talk to them while you can. We have some family stories from the Depression that reveal some things (like my great-grandmother having the only telephone in the area and using the dinner bell and word of mouth to shout for local men who had applied for jobs and were getting a call back) and older neighbors, too. Plenty of older people would love to tell their stories. My retired next-door neighbor was telling me yesterday about what growing up in this area was like...they still had oil lanterns and he and his brother spent their weekends shoveling coal for the family's winter heat. They had an outdoor toilet and he said they 'let the girls go first to heat up the seat' (LOL) and that his mother baked the best bread in the coal-fired stove. About the time that he described melting butter onto the bread he said he was making himself hungry.
    What comes after the NaPo storm of poetry?
    Get ready for the
    May 2021 Collaborator Challenge.

    Send your potential partner a fruit basket and start begging!

  6. #16
    There are still some WW2 stories out there to be told, but they're dying off fast. You can also get second hand WW1 stories , or even earlier, handed down through families.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Olly Buckle View Post
    They probably practiced everything from acclamation and appreciation, to beating into submission, though they probably wouldn't have called it that What do you need for your story? What do you feel like writing?
    I did finish that project ("Surviving Nathan"). Having a fairly active imagination I was able to imagine the hardship and toll it took - at times - on family life. Mom was soft and forgiving and Dad was harsh, but at his core he loved deeply. His own history, growing up, did not prepare him for fatherhood, so he floundered but not because he wanted to. Sometimes making yourself a character in your own story works - I knew him well.
    When the night has come
    And the land is dark
    And the moon is the only light we'll see
    I won't be afraid, no I won't be afraid
    Just as long as you stand by me.


  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Foxee View Post
    A lot of really great research is currently dying in nursing homes, unvisited. Maybe there are memoirs for the right time period if you can find them.

    If you're fortunate enough to have living older relatives talk to them while you can. We have some family stories from the Depression that reveal some things (like my great-grandmother having the only telephone in the area and using the dinner bell and word of mouth to shout for local men who had applied for jobs and were getting a call back) and older neighbors, too. Plenty of older people would love to tell their stories. My retired next-door neighbor was telling me yesterday about what growing up in this area was like...they still had oil lanterns and he and his brother spent their weekends shoveling coal for the family's winter heat. They had an outdoor toilet and he said they 'let the girls go first to heat up the seat' (LOL) and that his mother baked the best bread in the coal-fired stove. About the time that he described melting butter onto the bread he said he was making himself hungry.
    That is such a great idea! Makes you feel like going to nursing homes and scooping up stories. I live in Kansas, after all, which was a hotbed during the Dust Bowl. I should start another project - I love that time in history. Thanks, Foxee.
    When the night has come
    And the land is dark
    And the moon is the only light we'll see
    I won't be afraid, no I won't be afraid
    Just as long as you stand by me.


  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by epimetheus View Post
    There are still some WW2 stories out there to be told, but they're dying off fast. You can also get second hand WW1 stories , or even earlier, handed down through families.
    You are so right about that, epi. When they find the heroes of past conflicts, they usually talk about service awards, etc., but ignore what it was like to just live at that time. And yes, they are dying off fast.
    When the night has come
    And the land is dark
    And the moon is the only light we'll see
    I won't be afraid, no I won't be afraid
    Just as long as you stand by me.


  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by SueC View Post
    That is such a great idea! Makes you feel like going to nursing homes and scooping up stories. I live in Kansas, after all, which was a hotbed during the Dust Bowl. I should start another project - I love that time in history. Thanks, Foxee.
    You're welcome and I just thought of something else.

    Libraries have newspapers on file (might have to go to microfiche if they haven't updated to digital) that might even stretch back to the times you want. Local news could have some research potential if you're looking for slice-of-life info. Small local museums and historical societies, too.
    What comes after the NaPo storm of poetry?
    Get ready for the
    May 2021 Collaborator Challenge.

    Send your potential partner a fruit basket and start begging!

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