Am I just being a language snob? - Page 3


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Thread: Am I just being a language snob?

  1. #21
    Language starts with how we communicate as parents when children are first learning to speak. It drives me mad when I hear my son teaching his two year old to say 'Ta' instead of 'thank you'. I am informed ... He can't say say thank you. My reply: he never will unless you teach him.
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  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by PiP View Post
    Language starts with how we communicate as parents when children are first learning to speak. It drives me mad when I hear my son teaching his two year old to say 'Ta' instead of 'thank you'. I am informed ... He can't say say thank you. My reply: he never will unless you teach him.
    I used to get annoyed when people used terms like 'choo-choo train' or 'dicky bird'. Why not just train and bird? It's linguistic bubble wrap, designed to protect their children from the harsh definitions of life. Keep it fluffy and those nasty sharp edges won't bite. Yeah ... right.
    Craft / Draft / Graft And Write To Entertain.

  3. #23
    And pussy cat... and I flatly refused to be called Nanna or Nanny. I am not a goat (although my starsign says otherwise)
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  4. #24
    Oh dese words are so fire!

    Ppl don't word right. Mood.

    I'ma prolly get more cawfee.
    What comes after the NaPo storm of poetry?
    Get ready for the
    May 2021 Collaborator Challenge.

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  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by PiP View Post
    And pussy cat... and I flatly refused to be called Nanna or Nanny. I am not a goat (although my starsign says otherwise)
    Ah, so you're a Nanny. Noted for future annoyance.
    Craft / Draft / Graft And Write To Entertain.

  6. #26
    slang to me is more visceral communication than standard prose
    attention to SPAG works against the evolution of language
    and careful with the world view being only yours
    my case in point
    I did not see a dicky bird has nothing to do with bird watching where i come from

    one other thing that promotes a PS from me
    my teaching as a child had the full stop used to end a sentence.

    or if you started another line with a capital, the prior sentence did not need / require a full stop
    just cause we were taught this way does not mean others respect your point of view

    as for me I write much of my time on an ipad in the middle of the night
    capitalisation is a pain because in holding the ipad above me lateral movement to the shift key is uncomfortable

    back to the poem that started this
    i thought the use of poor language gave a greater impact
    remember Billy Idol had a PHd
    he just sounded ignorant for effect
    Last edited by Gofa; February 16th, 2021 at 05:10 PM.
    We are the measure of all things. And the beauty of our creation, of our art is proportional to the beauty of ourselves of our souls. Jonas Mekas

  7. #27
    Writing is an expression of self. It is a communication between the author or poet and the reader. As readers are diverse, so must authors be. Engaging with voices disparate from our own is necessary. I just commented to this effect on a thread about how and what we should read. I believe the more different kinds of books I read, the more different authors from different places and different lifestyles I encounter, the better I am as a person and as a writer. While the grammar here does not represent the structure I speak with, I understand its meaning and more importantly, I value that it is grammar--not incorrect but different. This is how language changes. Lexicographers will be the first to tell you that words are only what we mean them to be, and they are subject to our whims. We change them all the time. This is no different to me than the fact that in the UK they put a "u" in "flavour". I can read that word well enough, though it is not my word.

    Conversations like this always remind me of the split infinitive argument or the idea that you cannot end a sentence with a preposition in English. These were rules invented by linguists; they are not inherent to English or even natural, necessarily. They were an attempt to make this language more like Latin. "To boldly go" is as acceptable to me as "to go boldly" because they are my words and I can do with them as I please. As long as my words effectively communicate my meaning, they are correct.
    Hidden Content at SPANK the CARP Fiction and Poetry

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by thepancreas11 View Post
    As long as my words effectively communicate my meaning, they are correct.
    Yes and no.

    "I have got to be me." Correct for English class and other places where projecting education is more important than cutting-edge expression.

    "I've Gotta Be Me" Correct for Tony Bennet

    "I Gotta Be Me" Correct for Sammy Davis Jr.

    Sammy Davis Jr. would have been corrected in English class.

    English teachers probably don't make as much money as Sammy Davis Jr. did.

    Tony Bennet split the difference and nobody blamed him.

    Who is right? Horses for courses.
    What comes after the NaPo storm of poetry?
    Get ready for the
    May 2021 Collaborator Challenge.

    Send your potential partner a fruit basket and start begging!

  9. #29
    I am glad I asked the question. Snob or not I learned from you nice folks and I am grateful.

    One of the reasons for the post came from the thought 'Where is the written language heading?'. I don't know, but it will be interesting to see

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