Words we don't know - Page 3


Page 3 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 62

Thread: Words we don't know

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by bdcharles View Post
    I wonder if "deport" has a similar provenance, only with doors.
    Or shipboard.

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by vranger View Post
    Or shipboard.
    I like how everyday words often have totally different origins. Like get, as I understand it, originally meant a child, an offspring. Stuff actually means the material you stuff into teddy bears. Piece is a specific length of cloth. Thing is a meeting, a hustings. Decimate, etc. I love how all these specific terms get normalised.

    One day I will work all this into something ... one day ...

    EDIT: ooh, ooh - from etymonline.com: "ship (n.) Old English scip "ship, boat," from Proto-Germanic *skipa-" ==> "All right, skipper?"


    Hidden Content Monthly Fiction Challenge


    The first cut don't hurt at all
    The second only makes you wonder
    The third will have you on your knee
    s
    - Propaganda, "Duel"

    *

    Is this fire, or is this mask?
    It's the Mantasy!
    - Anonymous








  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by bdcharles View Post
    I like how everyday words often have totally different origins. Like get, as I understand it, originally meant a child, an offspring. Stuff actually means the material you stuff into teddy bears. Piece is a specific length of cloth. Thing is a meeting, a hustings. Decimate, etc. I love how all these specific terms get normalised.

    One day I will work all this into something ... one day ...

    EDIT: ooh, ooh - from etymonline.com: "ship (n.) Old English scip "ship, boat," from Proto-Germanic *skipa-" ==> "All right, skipper?"
    Decimate is a good one. The word means that an army takes 10% casualties, which is more than it typically takes for a unit to lose morale and flee. But the sense of the word, for a LONG time, means complete annihilation.

  4. #24
    I love Meraki - To do everything with soul and passion , to put everything you have into something you love with absolute devotion, and undivided attention.

    J.

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Bloggsworth View Post
    Always, specially when it is the overwriting on a palimpsest...
    I'll see your palimpsest and raise you a ziggurat.


    Hidden Content Monthly Fiction Challenge


    The first cut don't hurt at all
    The second only makes you wonder
    The third will have you on your knee
    s
    - Propaganda, "Duel"

    *

    Is this fire, or is this mask?
    It's the Mantasy!
    - Anonymous








  6. #26
    Member ehbowen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2020
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    183
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by vranger View Post
    Decimate is a good one. The word means that an army takes 10% casualties, which is more than it typically takes for a unit to lose morale and flee. But the sense of the word, for a LONG time, means complete annihilation.
    Actually, to "decimate" was one of the harshest punishments for soldiers in the Roman army. A unit which had performed poorly, or rebelled, or otherwise earned the ire of its superiors would be lined up, in rows...and every tenth man would be executed on the spot. Pour encourager les autres, you understand.
    There are very few problems which cannot be solved with a suitable application of high explosives....

    Are your characters taking a train ride? Visit Hidden Content ...or ask me!

    --------Eric H. Bowen

  7. #27
    What about words I don't know because they are new? In one small article reporting tweets I ran into:

    kpoppies

    welcome to kpop stan twt

    welp

    Kpoppies was easy to figure out. Was twt a typo? Ah, probably short for tweet. Stan and welp are still beyond me (though I have finally grasped that stans are not countries south of Russia). But those words are now in common use.

    This is a thrilling time to be a word lover. Scraping data! Firenados! Community infection just appeared one day and now it's common. The article was about hijacking a hashtag.
    Modern Punctuation and Grammar: Tools not Rules is finally published and available for $3 Hidden Content . Should be mandatory for serious writers, IMO. Italics, Fragments, Disfluency, lists, etc. But also commas and paragraph length. Discussed use of adverbs, and ends with a chapters on the awesome moment and the grammar of action scenes. Description at my Hidden Content

  8. #28
    "Welp" is not new. It's something old farmers say.

    When you're talking to someone and you need to get on your way, you might swing your hands together and say "Welp," or more commonly, "Welt."

  9. #29
    I'll go out on a limb by saying that uncommon words should be used in context so the reader can figure out the meaning if they don't know it.

    Someone, somewhere, decades ago told me that most Americans only have an 8th grade vocabulary. Which is pretty sad. Even worse though is that 27% of Americans don't read books at all according to the Pew Research Center. So if we make our books too daunting, we'll likely drive them away.

  10. #30
    As long as you aren't torturing the reader with thesaurus words, I doubt most will mind.

Page 3 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
This website uses cookies
We use cookies to store session information to facilitate remembering your login information, to allow you to save website preferences, to personalise content and ads, to provide social media features and to analyse our traffic. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners.