Words we don't know - Page 2


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Thread: Words we don't know

  1. #11
    Erstwhile (or is it erstwile?) - I always thought, till about two months ago, that it actually didn't mean anything. I thought people - perhaps even erstwhile people - put it in there just to fill space with something fruity-sounding. But it has a specific meaning - the previous occupant of a post.


    Hidden Content Monthly Fiction Challenge


    The first cut don't hurt at all
    The second only makes you wonder
    The third will have you on your knee
    s
    - Propaganda, "Duel"

    *

    Is this fire, or is this mask?
    It's the Mantasy!
    - Anonymous








  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Taylor View Post
    Ok learned some new ones here, but Acerbic and Aquiline are two of my favourites.

    Acerbic is so much better than mean or nasty. The word itself has such a visual connotation, I picture acid or sour lemons.

    And I use Aquiline to describe a certain type of nose, it is slightly hawked. I have always wanted one myself, so I use it as a favourable feature.
    The acidic connotation of "acerbic" did pop out at my after I learned it. That makes it easy to remember, I suppose.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by SueC View Post
    I was reading an article in the Guardian on President Trump this morning and along came this word:

    perspicacity

    It means: Perspicacity is a penetrating discernment —a clarity of vision or intellect which provides a deep understanding and insight. It takes the concept of wisdom deeper in the sense that it denotes a keenness of sense and intelligence applied to insight. It has been described as a deeper level of internalization.

    The author said that Trump did not posses this quality, so I had to look it up. I agreed with his assessment, but I wondered - how many of you look up words that you don't know when you see them in print or on the Internet, or do you just read on hoping you'll get the gist eventually? Are you compelled sometimes to use unusual words in your stories, just for the fun of it?
    How interesting to draw attention to a word hardly used. I really enjoy that meaning. The whole description sounds like more than astute or shrewd and kind of combines both perception and appropriate action.

    I’m thinking of other times certain authors drew attention to a word.
    I’m recalling something a high school professor said about the word epiphany and James Joyce... that Joyce had brought epiphany back into discussion and that before Joyce it was archaic and not in use. I’m glad Joyce brought it back into use if this is true. After I send I will look this is, so this post will likely be edited.


    Edit: Joyce re-purposed the word. Here’s an article:
    https://jamesjoyce.ie/epiphanies/

  4. #14
    I use blue if I personally think the word would be handy for creative writing and useful for showing.

    Blanch
    (to turn pale as if in fear)


    This one could be helpful for creative writing.

    Blandishment (false praise meant to persuade)

    This is not too helpful for creative writing.

    "He supplemented his blandishments by offering us a nice meal."

    IDK, it seems a bit dry to me.

    Blasť (to be jaded)

    If you want your characters to sound obnoxious, use this word in dialogue.

    Bowdlerize (to censor in an effort to create G-rated content)

    I've never even heard this word in my life.

    Bucolic (very rustic in a picturesque manner)

    "The houses were weathered grey, wearing shredded paper with company names in place of paint. Crumbling silos, unkempt pastures surrounded them. Their impression, however, was not bucolic."

    ​Conciliatory (willing to cede)

    I mention this one because I thought it had something to do with consolidation or concentricity. Nope! It's it's own word.

    Confluence (a place where two things flow together)

    A beautiful word. Think about ". . . a confluence of emotions."

    Deleterious (harmful to living things)

    How hard can this one be to remember? It has "delete" in it.

    Diaphanous (so thin as to be transparent)

    This could be very useful for writing. "A diaphanous pink membrane."

    Dilettante
    (a neophyte, someone who does something like a craft or sport for fun but not seriously)

    ​Dissimulate (to hide one's feelings. Surprisingly non-transitive)

    ALTERNATE DEFINITION OF ​Dissipated (consumed by the pursuit of pleasure, usually to some kind of detriment)

    Weird how that word also has that other meaning. English is arbitrary sometimes.

    Distend (to swell from the inside)

    Ebullient (an adjective meaning "to be full of jubilee," basically)

    Eclectic (having style based on a wide variety of tastes, cultures)

    This is an honorable mention because I learned it yesterday.

    Effervescent (to be in high spirits)

    I thought this one meant something like "brightly glowing," which it does . . . in a metaphorical way pertaining only to attitude.

    Evanescent (behaving like a vapor, vaporous in a way that tends to disappear)

    ​Extirpation (complete destruction beginning from the "roots")

    Filial (relating to the offspring of the parent generation)

    Foible (a little weakness of character)

    Fracas (a boisterous argument)

    Fulsome (displaying a disgusting excess of fawning or flattery)

    Gamut
    (range or scope, but it must be abstract)

    Garrulous (full of trivial conversation)

    Genuflect (to kneel before a king or religious item)

    Gossamer (delicate and thin, such as with food)

    Gourmand (a glutton, a pig)

    Gustatory
    (relating to taste)





    That's all for now.
    Last edited by EternalGreen; January 21st, 2021 at 11:56 PM.

  5. #15
    Can you pronounce the word I posted? I can't get my tongue around it. At least we can say epiphany. I like epiphany... thank you James Joyce. and you!

  6. #16

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by EternalGreen View Post
    Blandishment (false praise meant to persuade)

    This is not too helpful for creative writing.

    "He supplemented his blandishments by offering us a nice meal."

    IDK, it seems a bit dry to me.
    I've never heard it, but I like it. It's similar to 'flattery' but with a different connotation -- kind of a blustery, flamboyant feel, as opposed to 'flattery,' which sounds like a soft-voiced snake.

    Quote Originally Posted by EternalGreen View Post
    Bowdlerize (to censor in an effort to create G-rated content)

    I've never even heard this word in my life.
    I hear it a lot, I think because I hear a lot about "bowdlerized Bible stories," which is a real problem in Christian kids' books/adaptions. The story of Jonah's a classic one: the whole point gets missed because bowdlerized versions skip the part where Jonah doesn't 'learn his lesson' and remains unmerciful and hateful towards the Ninevites, even after God was merciful and loving to him.

    It's a very useful word to describe that phenomenon: stories being ruined or truth being compromised because somebody thought it was too hard for kids to handle.

    Quote Originally Posted by EternalGreen View Post
    ​Conciliatory (willing to cede)

    I mention this one because I thought it had something to do with consolidation or concentricity. Nope! It's it's own word.
    This one makes sense to me: "concil," like "reconcile" -- make up, compromise.

    Quote Originally Posted by EternalGreen View Post
    Diaphanous (so thin as to be transparent)

    This could be very useful for writing. "A diaphanous pink membrane."
    Ooh I like it. It kind of has a squishy, slimy feel.

    Quote Originally Posted by EternalGreen View Post
    Distend (to swell from the inside)
    Ok, that's close to what I thought it meant ... I kind of thought it meant, 'swell in a distorted way,' because "dist"<-->"dist." It still has a grotesque connotation for me; not sure if I can shake that.

    Quote Originally Posted by EternalGreen View Post
    Fracas (a boisterous argument)
    New to me, too. Love that! Because it has a positive connotation whereas "argument" has a negative one, and "debate" is too cool, too mild. Fracas -- great.

    Quote Originally Posted by EternalGreen View Post
    Genuflect (to kneel before a king or religious item)
    Haha, thank you for correcting me on this one. I thought it meant "to make the sign of the cross," because I'd only read it in the context of Catholic novels. Goes to show how I should be looking up words more often!
    In my mouth, if there be sweetness,
    It has come from my Creator;
    If my hands are filled with beauty,
    All the beauty comes from God.
    ~ from The Kalevala (paraphrased)

    Whom have I in heaven but You?
    And earth has nothing I desire besides You.

    ~ Psalm 73:25

    Christ is risen from the dead,
    trampling on Death by death,
    And on those in the tombs,
    lavishing light.






  8. #18
    Diaphanous isn't squishy or slimy. It's thin, light, delicate and semi transparent. "Aphrodite wore a diaphanous gown."

    One of my favorite words is defenestration. It means to throw someone or something out a window. "Dr. Dastardly must be stopped before he can unleash his doomsday machine, the Defenestration Device!"

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by MistWolf View Post
    Diaphanous isn't squishy or slimy. It's thin, light, delicate and semi transparent. "Aphrodite wore a diaphanous gown."

    One of my favorite words is defenestration. It means to throw someone or something out a window. "Dr. Dastardly must be stopped before he can unleash his doomsday machine, the Defenestration Device!"
    Sadly, there is no defense against defenestration.

    Unless you're too fat to fit.

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by MistWolf View Post
    Diaphanous isn't squishy or slimy. It's thin, light, delicate and semi transparent. "Aphrodite wore a diaphanous gown."

    One of my favorite words is defenestration. It means to throw someone or something out a window. "Dr. Dastardly must be stopped before he can unleash his doomsday machine, the Defenestration Device!"
    Quote Originally Posted by vranger View Post
    Sadly, there is no defense against defenestration.

    Unless you're too fat to fit.
    I wonder if "deport" has a similar provenance, only with doors.


    Hidden Content Monthly Fiction Challenge


    The first cut don't hurt at all
    The second only makes you wonder
    The third will have you on your knee
    s
    - Propaganda, "Duel"

    *

    Is this fire, or is this mask?
    It's the Mantasy!
    - Anonymous








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