Ethics for writing poetry


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Thread: Ethics for writing poetry

  1. #1

    Ethics for writing poetry

    Is it ethically wrong, to write poetry on your own personal experiences, for the reason, it may have a bias of your only perspective?

  2. #2
    Writing from personal experience is a huge part of an author's voice, especially in things like poetry. Bias exists in all people, it is a default in the human condition. Writing helps bring out biases we, as writers maybe unaware we have until it is pointed out. It is part of the learning curve. There is nothing unethical about it. It is a basic reality of existing.

    It is ethically wrong to plagiarise, to verbally accost others, and things along those lines. Words that are deliberately used to inflict damage to specific individuals/groups, same story. But to write from one's own perspective is essential to a writer's development. If you have an opinion you have every right to write about it. If the content might be questioned, give readers a heads up with a tag like Trigger Warning or Mature Content. Acknowledge the content to lend a bit of weight to the perspective and opinion.

    - D.


  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Darkkin View Post
    Writing from personal experience is a huge part of an author's voice, especially in things like poetry. Bias exists in all people, it is a default in the human condition. Writing helps bring out biases we, as writers maybe unaware we have until it is pointed out. It is part of the learning curve. There is nothing unethical about it. It is a basic reality of existing.

    It is ethically wrong to plagiarise, to verbally accost other, and things along those lines. But to write from one's own perspective is essential to a writer's development.
    Thanks a lot Sir

    Highly appreciate your response, I was a bit in dilemma, when was in discussion with a friend.

    Thanks again
    Ritu

  4. #4

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by EternalGreen View Post
    No, it's definitely not.
    Thanks
    Ritu

  6. #6
    I find it difficult to think of any writing that is not biased by the readers perspective. Even the writers of scientific texts would admit that what they are presenting is a model, rather than an exact representation of the world, and as such biased by their own experience.
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  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Olly Buckle View Post
    I find it difficult to think of any writing that is not biased by the readers perspective. Even the writers of scientific texts would admit that what they are presenting is a model, rather than an exact representation of the world, and as such biased by their own experience.
    I agree Sir.
    Thanks
    Ritu

  8. #8
    A recent T S Elliott prize winning book of poetry consisted only of the poets marriage breakdown, so no, write whatever you're driven to.
    A man in possession of a wooden spoon must be in want of a pot to stir.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Bloggsworth View Post
    A recent T S Elliott prize winning book of poetry consisted only of the poets marriage breakdown, so no, write whatever you're driven to.
    Thanks.
    I will.
    Ritu

  10. #10
    How can one write from a platform other than one's own experience. Perhaps there is some confusion about "experience":

    (today I walked two miles of city streets in my bare feet. When I got where I was going, my feet were cut, bruised, filthy, and aching terribly)

    OR

    (today I spoke with a man who walked two miles of city streets in his bare feet. He ended up suffering a lot of damage and pain, and he spoke with me in great detail about how deeply he was affected by this experience.)

    That conversation is as much a part of my experience as is my own walk.

    Heisenberg (1924) came up with his simple Uncertainty Principle', which distills down to: in any observation, experiment, quantitative analysis, or description we cannot enumerate the 'component' elements as though they occupied a reality 'out there', objectively separate from us, which we will now 'look at'. No, H contended, the scientist must add as an actual component in the data . . . themselves. Without getting into an arcane discussion about vestigial empiricism in the early 20th C, what H brought home to me is that there is no Objective Reality. Thinkers weld language units to phenomena or puzzles that they want to know about, just so that conversation is possible. Good . . .evil; hot . . . cold; simple . . . complex; reality . . .illusion. None of these great dichotomies exists in a plane free of the human minds that explore them. And a tree that falls in the forest 100 miles from a human ear does NOT make a noise. Faith is the only platform from which one could assert it does.

    The imagination that brings forth the experience of love to a person who has never loved is that person's experience of love. And however addle-headed and just plain stupid WE may find their experience of love, they have every right to put it out there . To use it in their creative work.



    ________________________________________________

    "I believe in nothing but the holiness of the heart's affections and the Truth of the imagination". Keats, ​Letters

    "No man is an island entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main . . . any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind. And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls -- it tolls for thee. " John Donne, Meditation XVII

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