Is it time for a new genre? - Page 8


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Thread: Is it time for a new genre?

  1. #71
    Quote Originally Posted by Taylor View Post
    All of these wonderful experiences filter into our writing.
    Absolutely.

  2. #72
    I prefer "no genre" - I'm as happy reading Austen as Robert B Parker, Chekhov as Len Deighton or Adam Hall. What I want is a good story well told, subject matter is secondary. I stopped using my local library when it split the shelves into genres as I used to start at A and work my way through picking up books, reading a bit and deciding whether or not to take them home, that's how I discovered Sara Paretsky, David Dobbs and others.
    A man in possession of a wooden spoon must be in want of a pot to stir.

  3. #73
    Quote Originally Posted by Bloggsworth View Post
    I prefer "no genre" - I'm as happy reading Austen as Robert B Parker, Chekhov as Len Deighton or Adam Hall. What I want is a good story well told, subject matter is secondary. I stopped using my local library when it split the shelves into genres as I used to start at A and work my way through picking up books, reading a bit and deciding whether or not to take them home, that's how I discovered Sara Paretsky, David Dobbs and others.
    Totally agree when it comes to libraries. Imagine missing out on a good book because, the story was a bit of a hybrid genre, so the classifier had to choose one, and it wasn't the one where you were looking.

    I just moved to a small town and it is so refreshing to see the shelves of the local library organized just in "Fiction", "Non-fiction" and "History". And like you, I want to indulge myself in whatever catches my eye. The back blurb will tell me what I need to know. And likely, the best novels are not so formulaic as to fit into just one genre. To have someone pre-screen books to decide what catergory they belong in, seems too pragmatic for the imaginative process of finding your next good read.
    Sometimes in the waves of change we find our new direction...
    - unknown

  4. #74
    Not a new genre by far - but lately I've noticed a resurgence in anti-government plot lines. The stories are akin to how Stalin came to power, but of course - they're set in modern times.

  5. #75
    Quote Originally Posted by indianroads View Post
    Not a new genre by far - but lately I've noticed a resurgence in anti-government plot lines. The stories are akin to how Stalin came to power, but of course - they're set in modern times.
    That's interesting! Anything written about coups in current day would have to include the whole social media aspect of the over-take. It's an interesting dynamic and we have witnessed the result of social media in politics in the last five years or so. It could be classified as 'Political Suspense'. I feel a WIP coming on.
    Sometimes in the waves of change we find our new direction...
    - unknown

  6. #76
    From an article in the New Yorker

    ...a good genre system—a system that really fits reality—can help us see the traditions in which we’re already, unconsciously, immersed. As it happens, there is such a system: it was invented by the Canadian literary critic Northrop Frye, and laid out in his 1957 masterwork, “Anatomy of Criticism”...

    ...Frye’s scheme is simple. In his view, the world of fiction is composed of four braided genres: novel, romance, anatomy, and confession.
    https://www.newyorker.com/books/josh...k-genre-debate

  7. #77
    Quote Originally Posted by Taylor View Post
    That's interesting! Anything written about coups in current day would have to include the whole social media aspect of the over-take. It's an interesting dynamic and we have witnessed the result of social media in politics in the last five years or so. It could be classified as 'Political Suspense'. I feel a WIP coming on.
    Joseph Goebbels, Reich Minister of Propaganda, was a master of manipulating the social media of his time

  8. #78
    Quote Originally Posted by Taylor View Post
    Do you think we are ready for a new genre?

    What would it look like to you?
    LitRPG is relatively new (first use of the word 2013, though there are examples of books that might fit it dating back earlier than that.)
    Last edited by Pallandozi; January 17th, 2021 at 01:21 AM. Reason: typo

  9. #79
    Quote Originally Posted by indianroads View Post
    Not a new genre by far - but lately I've noticed a resurgence in anti-government plot lines. The stories are akin to how Stalin came to power, but of course - they're set in modern times.
    Those are called "adventure" novels usually.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pallandozi View Post
    LitRPG is relatively new (first use of the word 2013, though there are examples of books that might fit it dating back earlier than that.)


    Glorified fanfiction is what a lot of that is . . .

  10. #80
    Quote Originally Posted by EternalGreen View Post
    Those are called "adventure" novels usually.
    That's a rather large bucket, but I suppose Atlas Shrugged, Fahrenheit 451, 1884, Brave New World, Animal Farm, and the like could be called adventures.

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