Elated or delighted - Page 2


Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 23

Thread: Elated or delighted

  1. #11
    To me, elated is stronger than delighted. As Taylor just implied. But I'm not sure I ever used it.
    My website (Hidden Content ) has good essays on starting a book and using metaphoricals.

  2. #12
    I would use elated, probably. It would depend on the character I think. Some characters would suit delighted more, especially if from a first person POV.

  3. #13
    I would not consider them stronger than one another per say, but it depends on the context and character's voice. Personally, I think of "elated" as an independent feeling of happiness. I think of "delighted" as a feeling you get from an event or someone doing/saying something.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by luckyscars View Post
    'Elated' is a word absolutely no normal human being on Planet Earth uses other than a minor coalition consisting of extremely upper-class British women, reformed junkies, Christian rock lyricists and sarcastic American tweens.

    Delighted isn't much better. That one has a slightly broader coalition, chiefly consisting of octogenarian theater critics, jewelry salesmen, and the citizens of letters to the Sunday Times mailed in by the beaming uncles of Tunbridge Well

    Basically, these aren't words normal people use. Why not stick with boring words like 'happy'? Don't reach for the thesaurus.

    Oh dear...
    A man in possession of a wooden spoon must be in want of a pot to stir.

  5. #15
    To be serious, both delighted and elated are reactive emotions, happy is an emotional state, they are not the same thing. Delight is reaction to a surprise, elation is a lifting of the soul, the el prefix tells you that.
    A man in possession of a wooden spoon must be in want of a pot to stir.

  6. #16
    Never in my life did I expect someone to claim that any variation of the word “delight” is pretentious or uncommon.

    Everyone knows what “elation” means. “Elated” is slightly less common but still clearly understandable by the average person.

  7. #17
    Never use these two words much, but "elated" sounds like someone having spirits so high they've turned into a sun ray, while "delighted" makes someone sound pleased.

    "Delighted" also sounds very posh for me, tea and monocle included.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by estranguerro View Post
    Never use these two words much, but "elated" sounds like someone having spirits so high they've turned into a sun ray, while "delighted" makes someone sound pleased.

    "Delighted" also sounds very posh for me, tea and monocle included.
    I'm from the UK and definitely have heard delighted used before, but not very often. I think I have probably heard 'chuffed' or 'pleased' more. I mean 'happy' is the obvious word, but I'd probably find that boring to use in a story and would want to find an alternative.

  9. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Attic
    Posts
    223
    Blog Entries
    8
    I’m disturbed by comments disparaging everyday usage of elation, elated, delight, delightful. I’d use three of the four, at least, in a quasi-medical sense, describing simple behaviours of service users. I believe critics of this language have spent many hours watching many Star Wars films and deserve sympathy.

  10. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Attic
    Posts
    223
    Blog Entries
    8
    Yes

    I saw John and he was delighted to receive his present.
    Almost the greatest elation, a train set.

    ...

    No

    ’i’m so bloody chuffed,’ said Timothy Peg-Rupert after scoring his try at Twickers.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
This website uses cookies
We use cookies to store session information to facilitate remembering your login information, to allow you to save website preferences, to personalise content and ads, to provide social media features and to analyse our traffic. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners.