Senryu - Page 2


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Thread: Senryu

  1. #11
    Carole, the depth is what you give it. Does a photograph have roots? Does it have a soul? The message isn’t in the poem, it’s in the experience of reading the poem. The message is a reflection of the reader.
    Last edited by TL Murphy; September 5th, 2020 at 12:57 PM.

  2. #12
    Since this thread is a wonderful teaching subject, I have decided to move it to Nuts&Bolts.
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  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by TL Murphy View Post
    Carole, the depth is what you give it. Does a photograph have roots? Does it have a soul? The message isn’t in the poem, it’s in the experience of reading the poem. The message is a reflection of the reader.
    Yes, I understand but like a picture or photo does a senryu need to connect with the reader in some way? For example an abstract picture needs some spark of connection
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  4. #14
    Well, Carole, that is your subjective POV, and you are entitled to it. My wife is a professional, abstract painter and her biggest frustration (and the reason that it is so hard to sell an abstract painting) is that most people cannot relate to a piece of art if it doesn't have something in it that is representational. In other words, they want to recognize something in the painting, and if they can't, they see no value in the painting. She could make paintings of flowers and mountains all day long that would walk off the shelf but she has no interest in doing that. It doesn't serve her creative curiosity. Abstract painting is much more sophisticated than that. It breaks the picture down into elements of form: colour, depth, balance, perspective and tone. It's more like a symphony than a children's story. It isn't about representation, it's about form, and the essence of creativity itself. So it goes beneath conscious communication and deals with the underlying assumptions that we rely on for perception.

    So, to answer your question, "does a poem need to connect with a reader in some way?" I guess it depends on what you mean by "connect." A poem that connects with every reader hasn't been written yet. And just because a painting doesn't connect with every viewer, doesn't mean it isn't a great, fucking painting. People thought Jackson Pollock was nuts, but if you stand in front of one of his paintings for an hour it will transport you to another universe and you will realize that he was a genius.

  5. #15
    Strangely enough I do have a couple of abstract paintings on my wall and it was the colour and texture that appealed to me. I have tried abstract painting and it is difficult.... especially when husband asked what is it was meant to be. My reply: whatever you want it to be. So, yes, while a poet may have written a poem a reader will probably translate according to their life's frame of reference.
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  6. #16
    That's right, and the less the poem tells ​the reader where to go, the more the reader participates in the creative experience. It's like anything else, you have to learn how to read a poem. It isn't like reading a cookie recipe.

  7. #17
    Here is another way of discussing your question about "connecting". I have done enough performance poetry to know what connects with, say, a young-adult audience
    Humour, repetition, exaggerated rhythm, a few risque refererances but nothing too gratuitous, and a fairly simple story-line. So I know how to write a poem that "entertains" in that way. And if I was paid good money to do that I might keep doing it. If I am reading to a more intimate, older audience, I will read more serious and metaphorical poems. But those poems don't go over as well with younger crowds who want to be entertained. And I am under no illusions that one kind of poem will sell better or be more publishable than the other. And I don't feel that I have an obligation to entertain. What interests me is how language connects with thought and how memory interacts with experience and how the conscious mind can access the unconscious mind. So these are some of the things that drive my curiosity and if I just laid everything out there in an attempt to be "accessible" then I would be prostituting myself to some kind of desperate notion about what other people want to read. And frankly, given the choice, most people would choose to read something nostalgic that allows them to bask in memory rather than explore the possibilities of what is just on the edge of perception. But it's perception that interests me.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by TL Murphy View Post
    the elevator
    rose quickly to the top floor;
    no one died that day.
    Read T L's poem
    to see if it was senryu
    It was. 5 7 5.

  9. #19

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by TL Murphy View Post
    This one's 5-7-6 but no one's counting.
    The only way to get 6 in the last line is to pronounce "died" as two syllables somehow. Is that how it is?

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