All Things Rejection! - Page 14


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Thread: All Things Rejection!

  1. #131
    Quote Originally Posted by luckyscars View Post
    Short story submissions is mainly just fishing. Either the story works for them or it doesn't. I have found that most of the time any short story can be published somewhere if you submit it to enough places, it's just a question of whether you do submit it enough before tiring of the process and what that 'somewhere' is. Places that pay are harder, obviously, and places that pay at a decent rate are extremely competitive -- and there aren't that many of them.

    A good story submitted to, lets say, 30 different places, will most likely receive an offer from at least one. Sometimes more. One of my stories got four offers, all paid. Imagine the shit-eating grin...

    'Most' is the operative phrase, though. Some short stories really are unemployable, unfortunately. That may be because the writing just sucks or it may be that it just doesn't 'fit' into the assumed genre. Some subject matter is difficult to publish. Some things editors just aren't comfortable with.

    I have, at this point, four or five short stories that I tried to sell for a long time, ones I believed (and still actually do) that they are good enough; went through the hassle of hundreds of submissions, and eventually gave up, ended up shoving three together into a 'collection' and self-published them because 'why not'. $1 for the 'book'. Self-published sales are next to nothing, I have done no promotion, I knocked them together in a night, but at the end of the day it's either that or have them sit rotting on a hard drive. I don't really care. I published dozens last year on one platform or another so a few duds isn't going to hurt my feelings.

    For the most part, I assume rejection on everything I submit, I even try to make myself look forward to getting the rejection. Sounds weird, but it's really just easier that way. You cannot invest emotionally into any given submission. You have to assume the worst or else it gets too stressful. It's not like I don't believe in the supposed 'power of positive thinking' so much as I am more wary of the cancer of discouragement. If you start to believe you aren't a good writer, you find yourself mired by an inability to write. So, everything I submit I assume the agent/editor will simply not find room for on their list, dwell on it no further than that, and get on with the day.
    Perhaps that's my problem then, I'm not being persistent enough in submitting, or spending enough time doing it. I do a couple then get rejected and get a bit fed up, then drop the whole thing for a while, then other things crop up and I completely forget it.
    Or you have developed a tough skin.

  2. #132
    Perhaps that's my problem then, I'm not being persistent enough in submitting, or spending enough time doing it. I do a couple then get rejected and get a bit fed up, then drop the whole thing for a while, then other things crop up and I completely forget it.
    I encourage either prolific submitting or highly targeted submitting. Editors have taste, vision. They are artists, just like us, and their mag is their artistic product. Even if what you have is really good, it often isn't going to fit into their vision of what the magazine is supposed to be. I'm more of a prolific submitter. It's worked decently for me. My sister does targeted submitting. Reading a mag, figuring out whether she likes it, whether or not the editors have similar tastes/vision to her own and then submitting. I prefer scatter-shot submitting because I've yet to find a magazine besides Strange Horizons that fits inside my own tastes. Unfortunately, Strange Horizons are very liberal, and I'm not. And the more experimental my writing (aka, the closer it gets to what SH publishes), the less ​liberal it becomes.
    Nail it to the Cross

  3. #133
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    A lot of them are such stiffs, with those very wet stories predominating. And you'd hope to be blown away, but the New Yorker, the Sun, I dunno, the hundred others spinning on our planet boredom, the stories about being American, and gay at the same time, and in Italy of all places zzzzzzzzzzzz dog food nourishment, thank goodness.

    Poems about lakes and moonlight.

    The world needs to tune in and toe the line. Don't get me on The Atlantic, 12 month subscription, most irrelevant year of my life [Dentist music]. Poetry still arrives, must have paid by accident.

    I'll submit tomorrow

  4. #134
    I encourage either prolific submitting or highly targeted submitting. Editors have taste, vision. They are artists, just like us, and their mag is their artistic product. Even if what you have is really good, it often isn't going to fit into their vision of what the magazine is supposed to be. I'm more of a prolific submitter. It's worked decently for me. My sister does targeted submitting. Reading a mag, figuring out whether she likes it, whether or not the editors have similar tastes/vision to her own and then submitting. I prefer scatter-shot submitting because I've yet to find a magazine besides Strange Horizons that fits inside my own tastes. Unfortunately, Strange Horizons are very liberal, and I'm not. And the more experimental my writing (aka, the closer it gets to what SH publishes), the less ​liberal it becomes.
    Both of those options really need time I think and I don't have enough of that just at the moment. I did submit to Strange once, although can't remember much about the experience. I tend to go with an idea, pops into my head, just go with that. I'm not really someone who targets really. Also I often read Sci-Fi mags and never seem to get a vibe about what an editor needs specifically, there seem to be a large range of subjects. Perhaps that's just Sci-Fi or maybe my antenna is off somewhat.
    Anyway, I'll get back to it at some point.

  5. #135
    Quote Originally Posted by Matchu View Post
    deleted due to repetition crime
    I read your original reply actually, since it appeared in my inbox. Hilarious.

  6. #136
    Quote Originally Posted by Tiamat View Post
    Well that was a hell of a rejection. I feel partially responsible here since I'm the one that brought them up in the first place, although I will say that some of the most scathing rejections I've gotten only spurred me to try harder. Here's hoping that you can put your (perfectly understandable) frustration to good use. Sorry, man.
    I'm not one to give up on anything, and I'm currently on another publishing blitz right now. I will never stop writing and improving my craft, nor will I ever stop submitting all over the place. It took me years and years just to get two stories published, and if it takes me even longer to get more published, so be it.

    I just do not like people that were as vulgar as the incident I mentioned. Completely distasteful.

    -JJB
    ​"Strong convictions precede great actions....."

    Hidden Content Hidden Content Hidden Content

  7. #137
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    Here you go, C x:

    After the rage of reading the literary magazine, comes the trawl of biographies, inducing the greatest rage:

    Panguin Slobb, creative writing tutor in the middle of nowhere. His chapbook of fine poetry entitled ME available in the Fall.
    Erin Wordsworse is a big thinker, and a campaigner for world food. Published Niff, Chitz and Chunder (UK) comic. Lives with mom
    Alfonso P Smith represents the working class & inhabits houseboat. Presently voluntary consultant UN, regular breather has published loads of novels on independent platforms.
    Susannah Free liberal community co ordinator, also sits at home all day on her backside like all these other writers. She knows nothing about trucks.
    Jason Pratt is a prat
    Dickhead Dickhead editor at large for Dickhead, the journal of dickheads.


    FICTIONAL & work in progress

  8. #138
    Quote Originally Posted by Matchu View Post
    Here you go, C x:

    After the rage of reading the literary magazine, comes the trawl of biographies, inducing the greatest rage:

    Panguin Slobb, creative writing tutor in the middle of nowhere. His chapbook of fine poetry entitled ME available in the Fall.
    Erin Wordsworse is a big thinker, and a campaigner for world food. Published Niff, Chitz and Chunder (UK) comic. Lives with mom
    Alfonso P Smith represents the working class & inhabits houseboat. Presently voluntary consultant UN, regular breather has published loads of novels on independent platforms.
    Susannah Free liberal community co ordinator, also sits at home all day on her backside like all these other writers. She knows nothing about trucks.
    Jason Pratt is a prat
    Dickhead Dickhead editor at large for Dickhead, the journal of dickheads.


    FICTIONAL & work in progress

    To be honest I've never read that many literary mags, mostly Sci-Fi, a few Fantasy. Not really my area.

  9. #139
    Quote Originally Posted by Monaque View Post
    Both of those options really need time I think and I don't have enough of that just at the moment. I did submit to Strange once, although can't remember much about the experience. I tend to go with an idea, pops into my head, just go with that. I'm not really someone who targets really. Also I often read Sci-Fi mags and never seem to get a vibe about what an editor needs specifically, there seem to be a large range of subjects. Perhaps that's just Sci-Fi or maybe my antenna is off somewhat.
    Anyway, I'll get back to it at some point.
    Completely get what you're saying. The range is often very big and it's hard to know what 'fits.' I like the anthology calls that often have themes, or magazines with very specific visions (like Prehistoric magazine that publishes dinosaur/extinct animal fiction only). i. e. I'm going to send something to Cohesion Press' SNAFU anthology this month (the theme is Holy War)
    In my mouth, if there be sweetness,
    It has come from my Creator;
    If my hands are filled with beauty,
    All the beauty comes from God.
    ~ from The Kalevala (paraphrased)

    Whom have I in heaven but You?
    And earth has nothing I desire besides You.

    ~ Psalm 73:25

    Christ is risen from the dead,
    trampling on Death by death,
    And on those in the tombs,
    lavishing light.






  10. #140
    Literary fiction is indeed full of liberals. There's no room for good ol' communists.

    But I'm joking. As long as the main characters aren't burning down a police station or something, I don't think it would matter too much.

    I've never had an editor tell me, "this work isn't sympathetic enough to social hierarchy, so we're going to pass."

    (Note to self: don't publicly refer to the editors of the New Yorker as "bootlickers.")

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