In case anyone is writing on terrorism


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  1. #1

    In case anyone is writing on terrorism

    Hello everyone,

    In case anyone is writing about terrorism in the modern time I wanted to put myself out there as a resource. I have studied terrorism and the history of terrorism for almost 20 years now. I'm not a technical expert in any way (can't tell you how to build a bomb) but I know many of the actors, personalities, attitudes, and motivations. I can also lead people to other good resources to help them out.

  2. #2
    Whether someone is a terrorist or a freedom fighter is a matter of perspective. In my next book, my MC starts as a paid assassin, then later morphs into a character fighting against an oppressive regime. I may contact you once I get to writing that project.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Frederick Brown View Post
    (can't tell you how to build a bomb)
    Oh, don't worry, I already know how to do that.






    Erm, I mean ... ignore this post. Nothing to see here, people. Move along!

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by indianroads View Post
    Whether someone is a terrorist or a freedom fighter is a matter of perspective. In my next book, my MC starts as a paid assassin, then later morphs into a character fighting against an oppressive regime. I may contact you once I get to writing that project.
    I don't really attach a moral judgement to terrorists specifically although I do see terrorism as wrong. My namesake is one of John Brown's (1800-1859) sons who followed his father to Pottawatomie Creek to murder unarmed men in Kansas (1856) because they supported slavery (retaliation for the sacking of Lawrence and the caning of Charles Sumner). When he arrived he found himself unable to carry it out. Later that year he was murdered in retaliation for his father's massacre of Pottawatomie Creek. That massacre was most certainly a terrorist act, but John Brown found a greater path for himself at Harper's Ferry. I will shamelessly plug myself by saying you can find out more here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=biA00FZNCQc&t=1s

    With September 11th, I was gravely traumatized by the horror of it, but it only made me want to understand why it happened. As a result I pursued a lot of knowledge that I am very grateful for. I understand now that while September 11th was not a justifiable act, it would be wrong to say that the US did not do anything to bring it about. Now I mostly judge men like ObL, Zarqawi, or Baghdadi for the harm they did to Muslims as opposed to the harm they have done to the US. Sometimes the world does need a wake-up call, but I am convinced terrorism is not the way.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frederick Brown View Post
    I don't really attach a moral judgement to terrorists specifically although I do see terrorism as wrong. My namesake is one of John Brown's (1800-1859) sons who followed his father to Pottawatomie Creek to murder unarmed men in Kansas (1856) because they supported slavery (retaliation for the sacking of Lawrence and the caning of Charles Sumner). When he arrived he found himself unable to carry it out. Later that year he was murdered in retaliation for his father's massacre of Pottawatomie Creek. That massacre was most certainly a terrorist act, but John Brown found a greater path for himself at Harper's Ferry. I will shamelessly plug myself by saying you can find out more here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=biA00FZNCQc&t=1s

    With September 11th, I was gravely traumatized by the horror of it, but it only made me want to understand why it happened. As a result I pursued a lot of knowledge that I am very grateful for. I understand now that while September 11th was not a justifiable act, it would be wrong to say that the US did not do anything to bring it about. Now I mostly judge men like ObL, Zarqawi, or Baghdadi for the harm they did to Muslims as opposed to the harm they have done to the US. Sometimes the world does need a wake-up call, but I am convinced terrorism is not the way.
    Did you visit any of the victims?

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Biro View Post
    Did you visit any of the victims?
    If you mean 9/11 victims no, but I have cried for them just about every time I think about it. The people who jumped from the towers haunt my nightmares sometimes.

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    There are lots of victims of terrorists around the world. I think most wouldnt have any thing good to say about them.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Biro View Post
    There are lots of victims of terrorists around the world. I think most wouldnt have any thing good to say about them.
    If you want to see the world for what it is, you must be prepared to open your eyes all the way. The terrorism of 9/11 made me open my eyes a little more, which I am grateful for, but I wouldn't thank ObL for it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frederick Brown View Post
    If you want to see the world for what it is, you must be prepared to open your eyes all the way. The terrorism of 9/11 made me open my eyes a little more, which I am grateful for, but I wouldn't thank ObL for it.
    I don't live in America. The rest of the world has had terrorism since the late 1960's. There are a lot of 'victims' out there than Americans.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Biro View Post
    I don't live in America. The rest of the world has had terrorism since the late 1960's. There are a lot of 'victims' out there than Americans.
    I agree. That's why I judge ObL more for the harm he did to Muslims, which I believe is far in excess of the harm he did to Americans. The US was the victim of a day that Muslims around the world have been paying for ever since. Beyond that he empowered worse people (Zarqawi) who caused intense suffering in Iraq and elsewhere. I cry for victims everywhere, not just here.

    That said, I know ObL made valid points. Even Baghdadi as bad as he was at least told the truth about Muslims suffering around the world. I flat disagree with anyone who wants to validate al-Qaeda or the Islamic State's prescriptions for elivating the Islamic worlds problems, but I don't deny the suffering caused by western influences in the Middle East (Balfour, Skyes-Picot, CIA overthrows, ect.)

    I know its a very tangled web of stories with no easy answers or simple fixes. John Brown is a hero of mine because he was reduced to terrorism and found a way to grow past it. I feel defending settlers of Kansas to keep it free from slaves was a decent excuse, but he had to be pushed past the limits of his ideology to become a man who would murder unarmed men in front of their wives and children in the dead of night. I love Brown and his ideology, but it doesn't mean he did the right thing on the night of May 22, 1856. Frederick Brown's death was the first and most direct consequence to him, but he was not the last of his sons to die so others could be free.
    Last edited by Frederick Brown; June 29th, 2020 at 10:22 PM.

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