Debunking Bad Advice - Page 4


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Thread: Debunking Bad Advice

  1. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by PiP View Post
    Good advice. I've now completed two NaNoWriMos and several NaPoWriMos. The discipline of writing every day really helped. I realise some people do not agree with these, but for me, it was all about discipline and 'freeing' the mind to just write rather than finding one hundred excuses not to.
    Wow, that is impressive! What was your greatest challange with the NaNoWriMos?
    Sometimes in the waves of change we find our new direction...
    - unkown

  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by Taylor View Post
    Wow, that is impressive! What was your greatest challenge with the NaNoWriMos?
    For the first Nano it was the discipline of making myself write every day, especially as in the second week I traveled to France to look after the grandkids and the became ill with pneumonia shortly after I arrived. I used the first person stream of consiousness technique. While I had a general idea of the plot I went way over word count and its still not finished.

    The second NaNo was again discipline. I am easily distracted and my mind wanders on to FB, WF or my blog etc. I am dyslexic so for me to churn out 1666 words a day every day for a month is quite a challenge. That said, NaNoWriPo was far harder because it was not just telling a story. I found with poetry that so many other creative factors were thrown into the mix that some days I'd stare at a blank page for hours.
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  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by PiP View Post
    For the first Nano it was the discipline of making myself write every day, especially as in the second week I traveled to France to look after the grandkids and the became ill with pneumonia shortly after I arrived. I used the first person stream of consiousness technique. While I had a general idea of the plot I went way over word count and its still not finished.

    The second NaNo was again discipline. I am easily distracted and my mind wanders on to FB, WF or my blog etc. I am dyslexic so for me to churn out 1666 words a day every day for a month is quite a challenge. That said, NaNoWriPo was far harder because it was not just telling a story. I found with poetry that so many other creative factors were thrown into the mix that some days I'd stare at a blank page for hours.
    You do have a lot of discipline! I find that if I can do 1500 a day, I'm patting myself on the back...lol!!

    I don't even know how to write poetry. I might give it a shot. Do you find that writing poetry helps your prose writing?
    Sometimes in the waves of change we find our new direction...
    - unkown

  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by Taylor View Post
    I might give it a shot. Do you find that writing poetry helps your prose writing?
    Helps ? Affects, certainly.
    Visit my website to read and connect to my 'soundcloud', where you can listen to stories songs and more
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  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by Olly Buckle View Post
    Helps ? Affects, certainly.
    Oh? Can we have more details please?
    Sometimes in the waves of change we find our new direction...
    - unkown

  6. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by Taylor View Post
    You do have a lot of discipline! I find that if I can do 1500 a day, I'm patting myself on the back...lol!!
    It's only for a month. Why not try it next year? Not only will it help with discipline but writing more will help you find your voice and rhythm as a writer.

    I don't even know how to write poetry. I might give it a shot. Do you find that writing poetry helps your prose writing?
    Yes, it does help. I think poets have their own voice/style as well. Writing poetry helped me understand meter, flow, alliteration, assonance etc. which you can also (I think) apply when you write prose. It makes you think differently. So the voice I had as a writer, say four years ago, is different from the one I have now.
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  7. #37
    All of what PiP says about assonance consonance, alliteration etc., but there are parts in my present work where I am describing a general action with single lines of dialogue from various individuals arranged as pure poetry. I really don't know how it is going to work in the middle of a story, but I have a situation where I have a group of people on a relatively mundane day out that has to happen for the story. In the past I might have dismissed it in a few words, that could be the better option, no idea.
    Visit my website to read and connect to my 'soundcloud', where you can listen to stories songs and more
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  8. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by PiP View Post
    Good advice. I've now completed two NaNoWriMos and several NaPoWriMos. The discipline of writing every day really helped. I realise some people do not agree with these, but for me, it was all about discipline and 'freeing' the mind to just write rather than finding one hundred excuses not to.
    Carole

    Not enough can be said about exercising you mind daily by writing. A writer definitely needs to do this to be good at it. It's just like practicing the piano. You just keep improving. People that are successful write every day. And when they write they are always the writer. This second concept is more complicated. It means to be creative even if its the grocery shopping list. Who knows, it could become a poem with the right imagination behind it. That is the point. Imagination along with the writing needs to be stretched out for deeper feelings. The more you do to the incidental writing the better you get and making the incidental in your writing come alive with details. And have fun doing it, even it is a struggle at times to find that right word for the perfect phrase. Go to it girl. You know how to ride the horse now. You'll be taking the larks in a single bond in no time. Whats a lark. See what I mean you have to keep growing. It's hurdle.

    a poet friend
    RH Peat

  9. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by Taylor View Post
    Do you find that writing poetry helps your prose writing?
    Yes! It helps with concision (packing a lot of meaning into a few words), sentence rhythm, and, on a larger scale, knitting images and metaphors together. For every story (and some characters) I usually have a set of images (some literal, some symbolic).
    "So long is the way to the unknown, long is the way we have come. . ." ~ Turisas, Five Hundred and One

    "[An artist is] an idiot babbling through town. . .crying, 'Dreams, dreams for sale! Two for a kopek, two for a song; if you won't buy them, just take them for free!'" ~ Michael O' Brien,
    Sophia House

    Christ is risen from the dead,
    trampling on Death by death,
    And on those in the tombs,
    lavishing light.



  10. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by Terry D
    For every cliche about writing that you've read there are a multitude of good reasons why it became a cliche. The problem occurs when the beginning writer doesn't look deeper than the cliche, and when advice givers either don't understand the cliche any better than the newb, or believe they know better than those (usually very skilled writers) who dispense the context for the advice.
    Oh snap! I think my head was just lopped off. But it was done so eloquently that I enjoyed it.

    Any WF Member: "Ugh! Stephen King! *Mumble Complain*"

    Terry D: "So, you have chosen ... death."

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