How did you learn what is good style? What is your definition of a good style? - Page 3


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Thread: How did you learn what is good style? What is your definition of a good style?

  1. #21
    Ok. I searched the internet. Here's an example of how to imitate. That would be the instructions. I think that example I gave earlier might be written for assessment purposes (since it is a textbook on how to learn rhetoric for description) and isn't imitation. Would be it frowned upon by readers if I simply used the sentences of a room to describe my own house to write different physical details for the room? Is that considered plagiarism (the above examples of circumlocution)? I was thinking of using the public domain only for that.

    On a web search I came across this. This does sound like style. You copy the mood and heart of the piece by reading a work and not copying nouns adjectives, and so on such as verbs. Hopefully this makes more sense than before. I think I confused them. I think is might be closer to what you want to explain to me.
    How it works

    Here’s a breakdown of how the ‘imitation as inspiration’ exercise works:

    1. Identify a sentence or short paragraph from a favorite work that, for whatever reason, strikes you as particularly powerful.
    2. Read the short excerpt several times, generating a list of stylistic features that characterize the writer’s voice.
    3. Create a blank template of the sentence(s), leaving articles, conjunctions, and prepositions intact (the template functions much like a well-informed ad-lib).
    4. Put the writer’s work away—don’t look at it again, or else it might interfere with your own original creative process.
    5. Select a topic that fits well with the stylistic features you pinpointed in Step 2. Freewrite or brainstorm about the topic, generating as many specific details as you can.
    6. Use the blank template from Step 3 to launch your own ultimately unique, piece of writing. If the template feels too restrictive, consider the stylistic features from Step 2 and write freely, incorporating as many as you can.
    Last edited by Theglasshouse; June 30th, 2020 at 08:04 PM.
    I would follow as in believe in the words of good moral leaders. Rather than the beliefs of oneself.
    The most difficult thing for a writer to comprehend is to experience silence, so speak up. (quoted from a member)

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Theglasshouse View Post
    How did you learn what is good style? What is your definition of a good style?
    If it keeps my attention, and I keep reading because I'm enjoying it.

    Quote Originally Posted by vranger View Post
    "Good style" has to fit what we're writing. It varies by genre and author. I think we'd get bored in a hurry if every author had the same style, and if you used a sterile and jargony sci-fi style for a gothic romance, readers would close the book quickly (or vice versa!).
    So true! I learned a lot about style when I was commissioned to author a "Style Guide for Audit Reports." The goal was to create a set of rules that would eliminate any style of the author and that given the same fact pattern and circumstances, everyone would write the same report. However, there were many revisions to the report to achieve this. In the end, I found it was impossible to meet this goal.

    Eventually, we created a report that populated multiple choice sentences that the auditors could choose from. A "Styless Guide for Audit Reports."

    Quote Originally Posted by indianroads View Post
    READING is the best teacher. Read good books in your chosen genre to get a feel for plot and character development, rhythm, timing, arcs, etc. Probably everyone here has a book they pick up and read every day.
    Totally agree. However, I am writing in the crime genre. I am trying to find good novels about modern day crimes that do not involve a murder. Since my stories involve crimes, but not murder, I feel the writing style needs to be a bit different than a murder mystery. Does anyone know of good authors that write about crime...and no murder?
    Sometimes in the waves of change we find our new direction...
    - unkown

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Taylor View Post
    Does anyone know of good authors that write about crime...and no murder?
    Here's a quick list. There may be a murder, or two, but that's not the driver for the books.

    https://strandmag.com/top-ten-heist-novels/
    “Fools” said I, “You do not know
    Silence like a cancer grows
    Hear my words that I might teach you
    Take my arms that I might reach you”
    But my words like silent raindrops fell
    And echoed in the wells of silence : Simon & Garfunkel


    Those who enjoy stirring the chamber-pot should be required to lick the spoon.

    Our job as writers is to make readers dream, to infiltrate their minds with our words and create a new reality; a reality not theirs, and not ours, but a new, unique combination of both.

    Visit Amazon and the Kindle Store to check out Reflections in a Black Mirror, and Chase

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  4. #24
    A lot of writers have different ways to define styles and approach it a different way such as cross-pollination and imitation. Style is a term that could mean different things according to the person. Any opinions on my last questions? Anyone can answer and share what they think.

    Style I have even heard people define as personality, some as voice, some as subjects an author chooses.
    I would follow as in believe in the words of good moral leaders. Rather than the beliefs of oneself.
    The most difficult thing for a writer to comprehend is to experience silence, so speak up. (quoted from a member)

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Terry D View Post
    Here's a quick list. There may be a murder, or two, but that's not the driver for the books.

    https://strandmag.com/top-ten-heist-novels/
    Thanks Terry.

    With a quick glance, I notice they are all men. Wonder if men are more fascinated with crime than women. My book based on a crime is geared to the female reader. Do you think that could pose an extra challenge for establishing a good style?
    Sometimes in the waves of change we find our new direction...
    - unkown

  6. #26
    Someone was generous enough to write in a critique that he preferred almost as if raw emotions in the sentences. To him the conflict needed its emotions. Because then it felt flat.

    IMO, when I wrote that someone was abducted. I needed to be more creative with my style. The moment that it mattered is when the language needed to be more powerful.

    I know edgar allen poe had a good style. If you read his stories its perfect for a foreboding or mysterious mood when something is about to happen. He also happened to be a gifted poet. He was well known for that. He might be good enough for you to read. He wrote some detective fiction and was the first when writing it. He created the genre. He also created science fiction according to some scholars. The murders in rue morge is a good example and the story with the air blimp or hot air balloon.

    I know some people advocate imitation. Some people's emotions can be triggered by music. I am most certainly going to read more writers with a rich style. Anyone can benefit.

    Now whether imitation is the above I don't know with 100% certainty.

    If you want a mystery novel or a murder mystery, I recommend books by Patricia Highsmith and Elizabeth George. Also, there is Agatha Christie.
    Last edited by Theglasshouse; July 1st, 2020 at 11:07 PM.
    I would follow as in believe in the words of good moral leaders. Rather than the beliefs of oneself.
    The most difficult thing for a writer to comprehend is to experience silence, so speak up. (quoted from a member)

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