Gray or grey ?


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Thread: Gray or grey ?

  1. #1

    Gray or grey ?

    Hello fellow writers, I know this might sound stupid for some but english isn't my native language and I want to settle on one. Which one is better to use when describing eyes?

    For me, Grey with e gives off more of 'old', while I like the way gray with 'a' look.

    I want to settle on one for eyes/hair (color) and one for weather/sky etc. What do you recommand ^^ ?

  2. #2
    WF Veteran Galen's Avatar
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    I see a gray sky on a grey day.

    Crayola uses gray as a color.

    https://www.merriam-webster.com/word...age-difference
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  3. #3
    Thank you, so gray for eyes, too.

  4. #4
    It doesn't vary by what the color describes, it varies by locale. "Grey" is British and "gray" is American.











  5. #5
    Depends on if your intended audience is American or British.

  6. #6
    Grey is the colour, gray is used by those across the pond who can't spell
    A man in possession of a wooden spoon must be in want of a pot to stir.

  7. #7
    Either word can work. I have seen grey used by editors of classical works.

  8. #8
    English teachers in school always told us both were acceptable.

  9. #9
    They are both correct, the original spelling of the word was 'graey'

    Gray is more common in the US, grey is most common everywhere else. It's not true to say it's a strict American/British English spelling difference though (like 'colour'/'color' is) because historically there are crossovers everywhere. Samuel Johnson is generally considered pretty British and he was adamant it was 'gray'. Really depends. I've read old books that spell it 'graye'.

    Proper nouns, obviously, are exempt from the variances. As are words like 'greyhound'.

  10. #10
    I was taught to spell it as grey for as far back as I can remember (I'm in the UK). It's only since using the internet that I've seen gray used (I note that my British English spellchecker in this browser flags gray as an error). Since I became aware of the variation, I've always regarded grey as British English and gray as US English, but some say it's not so clear cut. I won't say that I've definitely got it right, but the safest route would probably be gray for an American audience and grey for a British audience. As far as other locations go, I'm unclear.


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