Are Self-Published Sequels Difficult to Get People's Attention? - Page 4


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Thread: Are Self-Published Sequels Difficult to Get People's Attention?

  1. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by Biro View Post
    Was it very expensive Ma'am or if you went down the royalty route were the payments too much?
    No, it wasn't that expensive though I don't recall the exact amount now, in the neighborhood of a couple hundred dollars. I just paid it directly because I didn't want to bother with someone else getting a share of each sale indefinitely.

    You have a wide choice of voice actors. I just picked someone kinda new and low cost but you can also pay much more for someone with a lot of high level credits at it.
    Last edited by Ma'am; May 19th, 2020 at 05:48 AM.











  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by RWK View Post
    Getting picked up by a publisher. Then it costs you nothing, and you get an advance & royalties.
    Well, I don't think that's what the OP was asking about but it's certainly another option that someone could try for.
    Last edited by Ma'am; May 19th, 2020 at 06:04 AM.











  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by Biro View Post
    On this point. There may be lots of very good books out on Amazon which never get many sales because of the way people have to trawl through the millions to find their reads.

    Apparently some people say the place is just full of dross. Full of badly produced and bad books. So getting book sales is more down to marketing than writing as a good book can have excellent reviews but still not get the attention of the readers because it doesn't pop up in a readers face as a 'marketed' book does.

    Perhaps the same will or has already happened to audio books?

    I think the same is happening with audio books, yes, because just as with the self-published print and e-books, there's no gatekeeper.











  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by Biro View Post
    On this point. There may be lots of very good books out on Amazon which never get many sales because of the way people have to trawl through the millions to find their reads.

    Apparently some people say the place is just full of dross. Full of badly produced and bad books. So getting book sales is more down to marketing than writing as a good book can have excellent reviews but still not get the attention of the readers because it doesn't pop up in a readers face as a 'marketed' book does.

    Perhaps the same will or has already happened to audio books?
    There's a lot of books on Amazon, true, but a lot of people sell a lot of books without formal marketing, myself included. You won't make a living at it (at least, I don't, but I'm retired) but Amazon is still a plentiful venue if you're in the right genre. With the sample option and KU, people can try before they buy. And no, it isn't full of dross.

    Audio is a different venue because while you can put out an e-book or PoD book for free, audio requires expenditure. The better a product you want, the more it will cost. If you want an experienced narrator with a suitable voice using professional recording equipment, you're going to pay. The same goes if you are going to hire a trained editor, cover artist, or doing marketing.

    I looked into audio some time ago, but I'm not interesting in sinking that much time and effort into a project; its the same reason I don't bother with marketing: because in the end, it would take away time from writing. The only reason I'm going into audio now is I was contacted by a publisher; they're going to do all the work and pay me besides.
    Never pet a burning dog.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by RWK View Post
    There's a lot of books on Amazon, true, but a lot of people sell a lot of books without formal marketing, myself included. You won't make a living at it (at least, I don't, but I'm retired) but Amazon is still a plentiful venue if you're in the right genre. With the sample option and KU, people can try before they buy. And no, it isn't full of dross.

    Audio is a different venue because while you can put out an e-book or PoD book for free, audio requires expenditure. The better a product you want, the more it will cost. If you want an experienced narrator with a suitable voice using professional recording equipment, you're going to pay. The same goes if you are going to hire a trained editor, cover artist, or doing marketing.

    I looked into audio some time ago, but I'm not interesting in sinking that much time and effort into a project; its the same reason I don't bother with marketing: because in the end, it would take away time from writing. The only reason I'm going into audio now is I was contacted by a publisher; they're going to do all the work and pay me besides.
    The best thing we can do then, is give our books to you to be sold under your name and go 50/50
    Last edited by Biro; May 19th, 2020 at 12:05 PM.

  6. #36
    I only make a couple hundred bucks a month from my self-published titles, even less now because I haven't self-published anything new in a few years. But it's passive income and I mainly do it because I enjoy it anyway, not for a serious income. Which is not to say I would mind more money from it...

    Anyway, I get weirdly confused when people talk about all the self-published garbage to sort through on Amazon. I know it's true, but I guess the thing is, that's more a worry for readers than for writers.

    I do the best I can and mostly self-publish without even trying for an agent or publisher first because I already know that most of what I write wouldn't interest any that are large enough for me to want to bother with.

    I do a lot of small how-to books, for ex. and while I'm pleased to get a few bucks per month off them, I know the big publishers wouldn't bother with such small potatoes. They'd want a bigger topic or bigger name or both. Same with a lot of other types of writing, such as memoirs, poetry, short story collections. Even if your writing is solid, there's just not much market for such books by unknown authors. So you could make your rounds with the agents anyway first or just skip that step. Personally, a small press, micro-press or collective usually doesn't offer enough for me to want to give up the fun of getting to do everything the way I please. But that, too, is just individual preference, nothing wrong with trying for it.

    To get back on the original topic, I probably wouldn't do a self-published sequel unless the first book did well unless I was doing it for the love rather than for the money in the first place. Anything could always take off sometime and become wildly popular, who knows. But I wouldn't expect it.
    Last edited by Ma'am; May 19th, 2020 at 08:06 PM.











  7. #37
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    I'm curious to answer this question when I release the sequel to my own self-published ebook. I've heard that the most important thing in general with sequels is that they can stand alone, even though they continue a story. If not, they're hard to sell. As long as your readers' enjoyment of the sequel isn't contingent, on them reading the first one (the can piece together details from context clues) then it theoretically shouldn't be harder to sell than the first book. Theoretically. But, like many things in writing, theory rarely holds up.
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  8. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by Justin Attas View Post
    I'm curious to answer this question when I release the sequel to my own self-published ebook. I've heard that the most important thing in general with sequels is that they can stand alone, even though they continue a story. If not, they're hard to sell. As long as your readers' enjoyment of the sequel isn't contingent, on them reading the first one (the can piece together details from context clues) then it theoretically shouldn't be harder to sell than the first book. Theoretically. But, like many things in writing, theory rarely holds up.
    I disagree. I'm constantly being urged by readers to extend this series or that. I extended what I thought was a stand-alone into a trilogy due to popular demand.

    The thing to do is once you've got a squeal, reduce the price of the first book as a gateway device.
    Never pet a burning dog.

  9. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by Justin Attas View Post
    I'm curious to answer this question when I release the sequel to my own self-published ebook. I've heard that the most important thing in general with sequels is that they can stand alone, even though they continue a story. If not, they're hard to sell. As long as your readers' enjoyment of the sequel isn't contingent, on them reading the first one (the can piece together details from context clues) then it theoretically shouldn't be harder to sell than the first book. Theoretically. But, like many things in writing, theory rarely holds up.
    That is false. The best selling books in genre fiction are series. People want the story to go on. When you put out a new sequel, you find a ton of people going back and buying the first couple of books. The whole point is to get people to dive into your back catalog. Series are effective for doing that. Stand-alone books don't perform nearly as well in general.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ma'am View Post
    No, it wasn't that expensive though I don't recall the exact amount now, in the neighborhood of a couple hundred dollars. I just paid it directly because I didn't want to bother with someone else getting a share of each sale indefinitely.

    You have a wide choice of voice actors. I just picked someone kinda new and low cost but you can also pay much more for someone with a lot of high level credits at it.
    The problem with peoples books is the amount of characters in the story. How does one voice actor do all those different voices and still narrate the story. I think there is at least 40 different people in my book alone who have speaking parts. From 3 different countries and about 10 different accents.

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