Rag Rugs - Page 2


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Thread: Rag Rugs

  1. #11
    It seems that women turn frustration back onto themselves as self-hatred more often than men. This is why I brought in the mention of martyrdom because I think that is an element of self-hatred. The sufferer looks for proof of their own inadequacy and almost enjoys the vindication when it is proved.
    That came through clearly for me, Jen, well done there. I like the metaphor throughout this. Women who do this seem to be almost uncomfortable with any other reaction to themselves. Seem to want the validation of their own conclusions as if being right about this proves their worth to themselves if not to anyone else.
    There is no life I know
    To compare with pure imagination.
    Living there you’ll be free
    If you truly wish to be.~ Willy Wonka

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Pulse View Post
    Jen

    Irregular rhyme creates a fabric in which the unexpected can hide and resurface. I particularly like your assonance in ‘backcloth of sacking’ and was almost waitig for shredding to be associated with threading; but perhaps that would have been too predictable; we’ve got spreading instead.

    I like the way your seamstress is able to detach from noticing her surroundings so that she can work on the ‘making’. It is good to know I am not the only one who does that - ignores details to focus my energy on something that may be worthless to observers.
    Thanks for the kind words, Kat. And you're definitely not the only one who gets lost in a world of her own I do it all the time, with reading, poetry and even gardening. Sometimes it takes a minute to come back to reality and realise where I am!

    Quote Originally Posted by Gumby View Post
    That came through clearly for me, Jen, well done there. I like the metaphor throughout this. Women who do this seem to be almost uncomfortable with any other reaction to themselves. Seem to want the validation of their own conclusions as if being right about this proves their worth to themselves if not to anyone else.
    That's so perceptive, Gumby. You've picked up on exactly what I was trying to say. You've given me a dilemma now because I'd almost decided to get rid of that idea after the discussion with Julia (above) but it really was the metaphor that drove the whole poem, just as you noticed. I think you've restored my faith in the original.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by jenthepen View Post

    That's so perceptive, Gumby. You've picked up on exactly what I was trying to say. You've given me a dilemma now because I'd almost decided to get rid of that idea after the discussion with Julia (above) but it really was the metaphor that drove the whole poem, just as you noticed. I think you've restored my faith in the original.

    Dear Jen... I am deeply sorry for making you doubt your wonderful, powerful poem... only you know the nuts and bolts of your poem, only you know if your poem expresses your private, intimate emotions and thoughts...

    My comments come from my own experiences of abuse and my own personal journey to understand and accept my own self worth. It has been a life long struggle to not see myself as a victim... it is hard to see myself as a powerful woman, worthy of respect and love ... that took years and years...

    I love your poem, and for me, it is complex and deeply sad, but there is also a powerful message, she took her sadness and rage and turned the destruction of her
    memories into something beautiful...

    I hope you understand...
    She lost herself in the trees,
    among the ever-changing leaves.
    She wept beneath the wild sky
    as stars told stories of ancient times.
    The flowers grew toward her light,
    the river called her name at night.
    She could not live an ordinary life,
    with the mysteries of the universe
    hidden in her eyes....
    Author: Christy Ann Martine

    Death leaves a heartache no one can heal,
    love leaves a memory no one can steal....
    Author unknown.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Firemajic View Post
    Dear Jen... I am deeply sorry for making you doubt your wonderful, powerful poem... only you know the nuts and bolts of your poem, only you know if your poem expresses your private, intimate emotions and thoughts...

    My comments come from my own experiences of abuse and my own personal journey to understand and accept my own self worth. It has been a life long struggle to not see myself as a victim... it is hard to see myself as a powerful woman, worthy of respect and love ... that took years and years...

    I love your poem, and for me, it is complex and deeply sad, but there is also a powerful message, she took her sadness and rage and turned the destruction of her
    memories into something beautiful...

    I hope you understand...
    Julia, please please don't ever apologise for showing me the depth of feeling that a poem of mine can release for you! I am plenty wiry and tough enough to resist being bent from my thinking by any critique but yours was so deep and meaningful that it started to make me wonder if my original message wasn't rather trite in comparison. Gumby's critique simply helped me to realise that both interpretations are worthy of consideration. That you were able to draw so much emotion and understanding from my words feels like an absolute honour.

    If I made you feel bad for giving such a beautiful critique, I am the one who should be apologising. Peace Poet Twin.

  5. #15
    The poem was hard for me to follow because the poem has a complex main character. At first, you think the rug is the main character, symbolizing all there is to know about the woman-- that everything she builds is nothing but a sacrificial stepping-stone. Then your mind changes the main character to the woman when the rug is trampled (one could argue the point of the poem is a cautionary tale about persons with "muddy" boots). I think the main character is the act of forgiving without forgetting. She knows that ripping up her clothes is useless, so she turns the strips to rugs, but in the end she recognizes even this is useless, until.. out of frame.. the shoes become clean. She then sees the importance behind why she made her rug.

    "It suggests that she’s willing to relish the fact -
    her martyrdom constantly proved." She is self-fulfilled by accepting herself for what she's always been. Before she looked at herself like useless torn rags that needed someone else to weave together, but by the end of the poem she's resolved herself as an important, stitched rug.

  6. #16
    Thank you so much for the comprehensive critique, Chiefster. It means a lot to discover how my poem has come across to you and the detailed explanation of the thought processes that you went though is absolutely fascinating to me.

    I have been overwhelmed by the way this small poem has managed to prompt so many differing reactions from astute readers, which seems to underline the exciting fact that a poet's original motivation is a secondary thing and a poem assumes a life of its own once it is out in the public domain. I think this is what makes poetry such a special form of writing for me.

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