Undecided between two WWII female characters - Page 2


Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 48

Thread: Undecided between two WWII female characters

  1. #11
    I just looked up Gypsy werewolves and this may be a bad thing since they have been labeled or stereotyped by some as werewolves in a bad way.

    http://jonkofas.blogspot.com/2011/05...es-on-run.html

    Maybe instead of them descending from starting out as Gypsy werewolves, their ancestors that moved to Europe, met with a werewolf clan from either France or Germany and this Gypsy lineage was the last remaining werewolf clan in Europe that remained silent. So their ancestor clan became werewolves when these Romani groups had become intimate with French or German groups that happened to be werewolves. So she could have some French or German heritage as well.

  2. #12
    Member KHK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    119
    Quote Originally Posted by Breadcrumbs11722 View Post
    I want to avoid as much offensiveness as possible but I know that's never going to happen. Why do some get so offensive if she's a good Romani? Not bad.
    Romani were (and still are, in some places) one of the more persecuted ethnic groups, which inevitably translates into elevated levels of sensitivity to mentioning them in virtually any context.
    That's to answer your "why" question.
    But, as cyberwar said, nowadays it's almost impossible to say or write something that doesn't get someone's sensitivities triggered. So, while you're right to proceed with caution, do not let that debilitate your creative process completely.


    Quote Originally Posted by Breadcrumbs11722 View Post
    I guess I can use Romani then for the female werewolf he meets. And if she was from a lineage of Gypsy werewolves, her family or ancestors could of migrated to France or Germany but kept their clan secret to remain safe. She could then be captured by the Nazis when they discovered her lycanthropy but killing off her family and done experiments on her, using her dna. Does that have a good start?
    My concern about choosing Romani is less about the sensitivity of the matter, but rather about its being a commonplace.
    C'mon, that's been ground to dust already.
    If you want a fresher approach that doesn't not involve following a well-trodden path, consider an option of your heroine's being an Eastern European forced laborer. Hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of women (men too, but to a much lesser extent) were forcefully relocated Westward by the Nazis from the occupied territories. Their labor was used in the Reich's industry, construction, agriculture, and other branches of the economy. This is a generally lesser known atrocity committed by the Nazis (compared to Holocaust, extermination of the Romani, and even the PoW camps), but plenty of information is available out there.
    If you want a really complex segment of history for her backstory, with a piece of land that had changed hands repeatedly over the course of the first half of the 20th century (and even was independent for a whole day), look up Ruthenia. Originating from there would allow her to speak multiple languages, including Ukrainian, Hungarian, and possibly also Polish, Slovak, and Romanian. And, naturally, she'd pick some German while working there.
    Just a thought...

    Another option is that she's some sort of a Polish (for instance) underground resistance fighter, but you'll need a plausible path that takes her to Germany.

  3. #13
    Alternatively, you can have your character come from the Baltics (we happen to have a rich tradition of werewolf myths here). Due to their complicated history, the average Baltic person at the time could speak three languages (their own, Russian and German) with good proficiency, more if they were well-educated or did business abroad. To touch on the complex history of WWII, you could have members of the character's family fight on both sides of the conflict, all the while having suffered from the crimes of both sides. Say, one of her parents executed or deported by the NKVD and an elder brother forcibly conscripted in the Red Army during the Soviet occupation of 1940, and a younger brother volunteered (rather than conscripted as was generally the case) to fight in one of the Baltic Waffen-SS divisions in 1942 to exact revenge on the Communists for what they did. The character herself could be an Ostarbeiter like KHK suggested, rounded up and sent to work in industry or agriculture in Germany during the German occupation.

    On the note of experimentation once Nazis discovered of your character's powers, I'd suggest you make them focus on the supernatural rather than the genetic aspect of lycanthropy. DNA and its role in heredity was unknown at the time, and if anything, poor scientific understanding of heredity was largely what inspired Nazi racial doctrines in the first place. They were, however, keenly interested in the occult.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by KHK View Post
    Romani were (and still are, in some places) one of the more persecuted ethnic groups, which inevitably translates into elevated levels of sensitivity to mentioning them in virtually any context.
    That's to answer your "why" question.
    But, as cyberwar said, nowadays it's almost impossible to say or write something that doesn't get someone's sensitivities triggered. So, while you're right to proceed with caution, do not let that debilitate your creative process completely.
    I'll keep this in mind as I write. And yeah regardless someone will always get triggered. I'd just rather avoid anything too risky than take the chance.




    My concern about choosing Romani is less about the sensitivity of the matter, but rather about its being a commonplace.
    C'mon, that's been ground to dust already.
    If you want a fresher approach that doesn't not involve following a well-trodden path, consider an option of your heroine's being an Eastern European forced laborer. Hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of women (men too, but to a much lesser extent) were forcefully relocated Westward by the Nazis from the occupied territories. Their labor was used in the Reich's industry, construction, agriculture, and other branches of the economy. This is a generally lesser known atrocity committed by the Nazis (compared to Holocaust, extermination of the Romani, and even the PoW camps), but plenty of information is available out there.
    If you want a really complex segment of history for her backstory, with a piece of land that had changed hands repeatedly over the course of the first half of the 20th century (and even was independent for a whole day), look up Ruthenia. Originating from there would allow her to speak multiple languages, including Ukrainian, Hungarian, and possibly also Polish, Slovak, and Romanian. And, naturally, she'd pick some German while working there.
    Just a thought...

    Another option is that she's some sort of a Polish (for instance) underground resistance fighter, but you'll need a plausible path that takes her to Germany.
    I like this actually. But would this make her Jewish Ruthenia/Eastern European? How could she have gotten lycanthropy since I don't think any Polish, Slavic, Romanians have any lycan mythology. unless I say the Nazis experimented on her with the supernatural which cursed her while she was in a camp. And could it of been in 1935? Or would it not work? And for her to be in Germany in 1935 might seem skeptical.



    Quote Originally Posted by CyberWar View Post
    Alternatively, you can have your character come from the Baltics (we happen to have a rich tradition of werewolf myths here). Due to their complicated history, the average Baltic person at the time could speak three languages (their own, Russian and German) with good proficiency, more if they were well-educated or did business abroad. To touch on the complex history of WWII, you could have members of the character's family fight on both sides of the conflict, all the while having suffered from the crimes of both sides. Say, one of her parents executed or deported by the NKVD and an elder brother forcibly conscripted in the Red Army during the Soviet occupation of 1940, and a younger brother volunteered (rather than conscripted as was generally the case) to fight in one of the Baltic Waffen-SS divisions in 1942 to exact revenge on the Communists for what they did. The character herself could be an Ostarbeiter like KHK suggested, rounded up and sent to work in industry or agriculture in Germany during the German occupation.

    On the note of experimentation once Nazis discovered of your character's powers, I'd suggest you make them focus on the supernatural rather than the genetic aspect of lycanthropy. DNA and its role in heredity was unknown at the time, and if anything, poor scientific understanding of heredity was largely what inspired Nazi racial doctrines in the first place. They were, however, keenly interested in the occult.
    I like this! So this means she could have not been in Germany in 1935 then? More likely in the 1940's? I had plans for a Baltic character also coming from a werewolf background but set in the 1980's in Afghanistan and she would be fighting the Soviets. She would end up getting together with the US soldier's second son grown up after he was in Vietnam then went on a mission to Soviet-Afghan conflict in the 80's.

    But if it's more plausible having the female werewolf from WWII being of Baltic descent then I would go for that, or take KHK's advice and have the female werewolf from WWII being Polish/Slavic/Romanian or whichever.

    I agree with the occult and supernatural idea. The Nazis and Hitler were very famous for being admired by these kind of things and they could of tapped into supernatural myths when they captured and discovered her.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Breadcrumbs11722 View Post
    I think they were originally from Northern India then moved to Europe centuries ago. Romanians are Eastern Europeans near Czech or Russia. Do you think if she's a Romani werewolf that would be offensive? Maybe I can come up with a better idea instead of werewolf like a resurrected demigod from Egypt like Anubis? It's like a dog or wolf but not like the savaging were beast in folklore. Wadda'ya think?
    Whatever background the werewolf has, you can be sure that someone, somewhere, will be offended. Some will be offended simply by her being female. Having written that, using a Jewish female werewolf around the time of WW2 could be seen as metaphorical by some. I suppose you could build part of the fiction around actual events - maybe have her go out on Kristallnacht ( November, 1938 ) wreaking revenge on some of the perpetrators (full moon occurred a couple of days before Kristallnacht, but you can always embellish). Or maybe have her have her fooling the Nazis into believing that werewolfism was a Russian plot, so nudging them into invading Russia and screwing up their war effort.
    Last edited by Phil Istine; February 14th, 2020 at 10:18 AM.


  6. #16
    That's not a bad idea. So kind of like some conspiracy to set up the Nazis?

    Maybe instead of saying this Eastern European Jewish woman was a werewolf I can say she was transformed by the Nazis when they experimented on her with lycanthropy using the occult magic?

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Breadcrumbs11722 View Post
    That's not a bad idea. So kind of like some conspiracy to set up the Nazis?

    Maybe instead of saying this Eastern European Jewish woman was a werewolf I can say she was transformed by the Nazis when they experimented on her with lycanthropy using the occult magic?
    That idea has merit too. Although it's a fantasy novel, there's scope for bringing in occurrences that actually happened. However, if you reference the specific, it may take a little more research. A thought that just popped into my head. When I checked, Kristallnacht occurred two or three days after a full moon (please double check this though). As the werewolf is female, maybe you could link the change into her menstrual period, but it gets delayed a couple of days due to the shock of experiencing Kristallnacht. There's scope for some powerful writing with that idea, especially if you want to bring pre-menstrual stress into the equation.


  8. #18
    What about the idea that she was a victim in the concentration camps, or a slave laborer or Eaatern European resistance fighter and the Nazis experimented on her with the occult turning her into a werewolf? Or is it better she was already one to begin with?

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Istine View Post
    That idea has merit too. Although it's a fantasy novel, there's scope for bringing in occurrences that actually happened. However, if you reference the specific, it may take a little more research. A thought that just popped into my head. When I checked, Kristallnacht occurred two or three days after a full moon (please double check this though). As the werewolf is female, maybe you could link the change into her menstrual period, but it gets delayed a couple of days due to the shock of experiencing Kristallnacht. There's scope for some powerful writing with that idea, especially if you want to bring pre-menstrual stress into the equation.
    Won't female readers be offended by this?

  10. #20
    Member KHK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    119
    Quote Originally Posted by Breadcrumbs11722 View Post
    Won't female readers be offended by this?
    What's there to be offended by?
    It's pure physiology. And if anything, it would be a good thing that you're taking it into the consideration.
    Assuming you address the subject accurately and without sliding into a cliche.

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
This website uses cookies
We use cookies to store session information to facilitate remembering your login information, to allow you to save website preferences, to personalise content and ads, to provide social media features and to analyse our traffic. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners.