Random Musical Musings


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  1. #1

    Random Musical Musings

    Got something to say about the music you love that doesn't quite fit into any other thread but doesn't exactly warrant a thread of it's own? Say it here!



    Pink Floyd's "The Wall" was almost a Roger Waters solo album.

    After the notorious "spitting incident" in Montreal at the end of the In The Flesh ("Animals") tour, Roger Waters secluded himself at his country restate while the rest of the band recorded their solo albums.

    Convening some time later to discuss their next project, Waters presented to his bandmates two concept albums he had written during his sojourn. The first was a bitter but hopeful and dream-like examination of a man's existential crisis. The second was the story of an alienated rock star who goes mad while isolated in a swank hotel room. The band chose the second. They called it, simply, "The Wall". Five years later, Waters used the other concept as the basis for his first solo album. He would call it "The Pros and Cons of Hitchhiking."


    Coming soon: the notorious spitting incident.

  2. #2
    Never owned a copy but I did buy another brick in the wall single in 79....bit dif but better than the album version
    The only one who can heal you is you.




  3. #3
    The Notorious Spitting Incident

    While touring the bitter, misanthropic Animals LP, Roger Waters increasingly showed signs of what associates variously termed paranoia or megalomania. He kept largely to himself. shunning the Floud's festive pre- and post-concert dinners and receptions.

    Much of this alienation stemmed (and to his credit) from profound misgivings about the dehumanizing venues in which he had allowed the Floyd to play, and his inability under such circumstances to feel any sense of community or communication with his audiences- "most of whom," he later contended, "were only there for the beer." And, he added, "it's very hard to perform in that situation with people whistling and shouting and screaming and throwing things and hitting each other and crashing about..but I felt at the same time that it was a situation that we had created ourselves out of our own greed." From Roger's perspective, the band was no longer a victim of the rock machine but had become an active collaborator.

    Waters was horrified at the recognition that something so personal as his own songs had gradually been transformed into "a circus and meaningless ritual." As he was to tell the author Timothy White, "Rock 'n' Roll is becoming greed disguised as entertainment just has war had become greed disguised as politics."

    Any such twinges of conscience, however, could not mitigate Roger's perception of his audience-- thirty, fifty, sometimes ninety thousand strong-- as one monolithic, insensate, roaring, flailing beast. It was at the very last show--at Montreal's Olympic Stadium on July 6th--that he finally cracked.

    During the course of the evening, Roger's baleful gaze zeroed in among the fans up front reveling in the band's "space cadet glow", to one particular kid he didn't like the looks of--a little worm writhing upon the belly of the beast. Water's began directing his entire performance at this hapless boy, luring him ever closer, as the teenager reached heights of mindless ecstasy with each glance and gesture from his contemptuous idol. Finally, Roger leaned into the fan's face--and let fly a great gob of spit.

    Summoned back by thunderous applause for the obligatory encore, a ravaged-sounding Waters announced, "We can't do any of our old songs so we're just gonna play some music to go home to." No one noticed that David Gilmour was no longer even onstage: the exasperated guitarist had slipped unrecognized into the audience, leaving his fellow Floyds to improvise a sad, slow blues.
    Returning to England, Waters was consumed by the ultimate conceit of his entire career, something he had been idly contemplating for years. In view of "this enormous barrier between them and what I was trying to do, [which] had become almost impossible to clamber over," Roger vowed that if Pink FLoyd were ever to perform another concert extravaganza, it would literally be from behind...a wall.

    --edited from "Saucerful of Secrets: The Pink Floyd Odyssey" by Nicholas Schaffner


    note: Before it was helmed by director Alan Parker, Water's original screenplay for the "In The Flesh" segment of Pink Floyd The Wall featured Pink's adoring audience beset by WWll bombers, blowing them up as they wildly cheered their own destruction.

  4. #4
    I loved and still love, "The Wall." "Animals" was amazing, too. The only other album that I feel holds a candle to either of those, was, "The Final Cut."

    "The Wall," as a film, was disturbing and very cutting edge. Even today, it's still amazing.

  5. #5
    I used to listen to the entire Wall album every day. It remains one of my favorite albums of all times. When I was stationed in West Germany and Reagan sent the Pershing IIs over, and the anti-nuke crowd was going nuts, we would blare The Wall while we geared up for another day of dodging rocks and thumping heads.

    Oddly, I never liked anything by PF since.
    Hidden Content

    Never pet a burning dog.

  6. #6
    Floyd was one of those bands who never got their due. I don't know why, either. They were enormously popular, but now... I don't know. It's like they didn't have the staying power of bands like Blue Oyster Cult, Black Sabbath, or Led Zeppelin.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Amnesiac View Post
    Floyd was one of those bands who never got their due. I don't know why, either. They were enormously popular, but now... I don't know. It's like they didn't have the staying power of bands like Blue Oyster Cult, Black Sabbath, or Led Zeppelin.
    Don't forget that the Floyd era that produced their landmark post-Dark Side Of The Moon albums could be considered the third act of their career, the first being the late 60's Syd Barrett era when they became darlings of the UK underground psychedelic pop scene. When Barrett (founder, lead guitarist/vocalist, and primary songwriter) lost his mind to what is historically undiagnosed but was most likely schizophrenia, the band replaced him with David Gilmour and floundered about for several albums, trying to re-establish themselves with unfocused but promising works like Atom Heart Mother and, my personal favorite, Ummagumma. They also did several soundtrack albums. This could be considered their second act. In 1973, Roger Waters took the helm with his Dark Side Of The Moon concept, and the rest is history. But the sad shadow of their good friend Syd and his unpleasant fate never left their music, and if anything, intensified as they headed into their big-arena days. He was the "crazy diamond" in "Shine On YOu Crazy Diamond", and the main character in The Wall could be said to have been modeled more on Barrett than Waters.

    Because of my mother's unstable attachment style, I had lots of "dads" while growing up. This included a rotating roster of step-siblings, mysterious half-remembered hangers-on, and the occasional drug dealer. Between the ages of 7 and 11, I had a very cool stepbrother. He was an audiophile who would replace his favorite albums with new copies whenever they appeared to wear out. He'd give me the old albums, which included most of the early Floyd discography. Because of this, I grew up with Pink Floyd, and when Dark Side came out, I was old enough to buy my own copy. The rest is history. I Am The Pink Floyd Master.

  8. #8
    Syd Barrett's genius at its peak, 1967.


  9. #9
    Finally life-changingly (at least for me) remastered in 2016, the unreleased "Scream Thy Last Scream" hints at Barrett's emerging mental health woes.





    Scream thy last scream old woman with a casket
    Blam blam your pointers point your pointers
    Waddle with apples to crunchy Mrs. Stores
    She'll be scrubbing bubbles on all fours
    Scream thy last scream old woman with a casket

    Fling your arms madly old lady with a daughter
    Flat tops of houses, mouses, houses
    Fittle and tittle and zittin' quack quack
    Watching the telly till all hours, telly time!
    Fling your arms madly, old lady with a daughter

    Scream thy last scream old woman with a casket
    Blam blam your pointers point your pointers
    Waddle with apples to crunchy Mrs. Stores
    She'll be scrubbing bubbles on all fours
    Scream thy last scream old woman with a casket

  10. #10
    Syd's first solo single, 1970.



    Is there anybody in there?

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