Create Space


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Thread: Create Space

  1. #1

    Create Space

    I originally did my books with Create Space. I loved it. I really liked formatting eBooks with Sigil. I liked laying out print books with Scribus. I made my own covers. I used GIMP for the eBooks and Scribus for the print books. It was an artisan experience.
    My covers were amateurish. They were also powerful. No one would mistake my books for a corporate product.
    When Amazon closed Create Space I migrated my books to KDP. There was no problem.
    Earlier this year I decided to change my copyright to a Creative Commons licence. I believe in sharing. I have reservations about the market.
    That's when the problem started. I had no problem with the eBooks. My print books were rejected. My fonts were not properly embedded. What? I had never heard of embedded fonts.
    Apparently embedding fonts means inserting the font file in the document. You can do it in Word. Unsurprisingly you can also do it with Open Office and Libre Office. You can do it with PDF if you have a couple of hundred USD to spare for Acrobat.
    You can't do it with desktop publishing programs. Amazon is locking you in. You can't take your file and use it elsewhere.
    Making a paperback with Word on KDP is quick, easy, fun and free. That may remind you of other Amazon services. If the layout features in Word performed as advertised there would be little loss of quality. They don't. There are problems with margins and with pagination.
    Producing the eBook with KDP is even quicker and easier. I have much less control. When I formatted the eBook with Sigil and made a cover with GIMP I could embed the cover and send a copy as an email attachment. If I make the book with KDP I can't.
    I regret the loss of creative freedom. There is also a gain. The cover templates on KDP are quite good. They are quick and easy to use. I now have a uniform edition of books that look adequately professional.
    I have avoided dependence on corporate publishers. I can write what I want. I can publish it or not as I see fit.
    I am dependent on Amazon. I can't find readers without the Amazon distribution network. That's where the readers are.
    I have traded one dependence for another. I accept the need to use Amazon. I don't like oligopoly. I don't know how to move forward from here.
    More perhaps about Amazon in a day or two.

  2. #2
    Sometimes, I wrestle with my demons. Other times, we just snuggle.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Amnesiac View Post
    Unfortunately that link is unavailable to me, because I am using a VPN, the site rejects it.

    I prefer >> LULU << over CreateSpace
    It doesn't ask for all sorts of in-depth personal information
    Hidden Content
    Follow Flashes on...Hidden Content ...Hidden Content ...Hidden Content
    (we even allow simultaneous submissions!)


  4. #4
    You can publish print & eBooks at a variety of places.
    Ingram is popular for print. You can use the free code Nano2020 until Feb 6th (I believe)

    Draft 2 Digital is a great place to multi-submit your book to a variety of platforms including Baker & Taylor, and Overdrive (vendors who commonly sell to libraries)

    Smashwords is very similar to D2d, and will register your books at a variety of marketplaces.

    You can use your existing print ISBNs...but Amazon considers the eBook ISBNs they assign to be proprietary, so you will either need to get new ISBNs for these new marketplaces, or use the free ones they offer.
    Amazon eBook ISBNs are not portable.






    PS: Word will embed fonts. Also, Word will save a file as a PDF, which is the preferred way to upload a print book. Adobe acrobat DC costs about $15 a month. If you need a copy if InDesign (to make covers for Ingram) it runs about $31 a month.
    Choose the month-to-month option and you can cancel the software as soon as you are done with it.

  5. #5
    I'm reviving this old post to ask if you have used Ingramspark, Ralph. They do both print and ebooks now and some folks say it's a simpler format than KDP and offers distribution on a wider scale than Amazon. I'm wondering if anyone here has experience with them.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Ravensdale View Post
    When Amazon closed Create Space I migrated my books to KDP. There was no problem.
    Earlier this year I decided to change my copyright to a Creative Commons licence. I believe in sharing. I have reservations about the market.

    Amazon doesn't recognize CC license. You either own the copyright, or it's public domain. They have rules about publishing public domain.

    That's when the problem started. I had no problem with the eBooks. My print books were rejected. My fonts were not properly embedded. What? I had never heard of embedded fonts.
    Apparently embedding fonts means inserting the font file in the document. You can do it in Word. Unsurprisingly you can also do it with Open Office and Libre Office. You can do it with PDF if you have a couple of hundred USD to spare for Acrobat.

    There are free PDF conversion programs that work. Embedding the file is a step in the process.

    You can't do it with desktop publishing programs. Amazon is locking you in. You can't take your file and use it elsewhere.

    Of course you can. All Amazon requires is a well-formatted Word document (a .doc or .docx for ebooks, or a PDF for print). No one other than Amazon used .mobi or their latest file type, so of course you can't use it elsewhere. You can format epubs with Calibre, or another program, from your own Word file.

    Making a paperback with Word on KDP is quick, easy, fun and free. That may remind you of other Amazon services. If the layout features in Word performed as advertised there would be little loss of quality. They don't. There are problems with margins and with pagination.

    All print must be submitted as a PDF file, which can be made in any number of programs. If you format properly, you'll have no issues with margins or page numbers.

    Producing the eBook with KDP is even quicker and easier. I have much less control. When I formatted the eBook with Sigil and made a cover with GIMP I could embed the cover and send a copy as an email attachment. If I make the book with KDP I can't.

    Don't make a book using Kindle Create, if that's what you're doing. Again, learn how to format a book. Don't include a cover in the file for Amazon, it's no longer needed. It hasn't been for years now.

    I regret the loss of creative freedom. There is also a gain. The cover templates on KDP are quite good. They are quick and easy to use. I now have a uniform edition of books that look adequately professional.

    What loss of creative freedom? You have to comply with formatting rules no matter where you go. Smashwords is not the same. Kobo is not the same. D2D is not the same. I honestly don't get why you give conflicting statements in every paragraph. Follow the rules, format properly, no problems.

    I have avoided dependence on corporate publishers. I can write what I want. I can publish it or not as I see fit.
    I am dependent on Amazon. I can't find readers without the Amazon distribution network. That's where the readers are.

    Everyone has to advertise. It's no different on any site. Many use Facebook ads, Amazon ads, services like Bookbub. It's true than many find the majority of their readers are on Amazon, but others find the opposite. It's just how this works.

    I have traded one dependence for another. I accept the need to use Amazon. I don't like oligopoly. I don't know how to move forward from here.
    More perhaps about Amazon in a day or two.

    You move forward by studying and learning how to publish on other sites, about how to do ads, about how to format for whatever site you desire to be on.

    Create Space is gone. Moaning about it isn't going to change that. Either adapt, or die (metaphorically speaking). Things change all the time, it's up to you to keep up, to learn the newest stuff, to adapt your business model.


  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Neetu View Post
    I'm reviving this old post to ask if you have used Ingramspark, Ralph. They do both print and ebooks now and some folks say it's a simpler format than KDP and offers distribution on a wider scale than Amazon. I'm wondering if anyone here has experience with them.


    Yes, I have books with Smashwords, Ingram, D2D, and Amazon. Groups like D2D and Smashwords register you with almost a dozen publishers each. Indies United is starting a library push (to sell ebooks to libraries) so we have been moving a lot of our books into these other venues.


    But none of them have the marketplace of Amazon.

  8. #8

  9. #9
    Thanks for describing Create Space.

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