What the ear can do, rules cannot.


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Thread: What the ear can do, rules cannot.

  1. #1

    What the ear can do, rules cannot.

    I have long searched for a recipe for producing cadence in prose, which comprises a series of stressed and unstressed syllables, creating the sound of various writing styles depending on the arrangement of those syllables. I have not had so much trouble finding words that conform to a certain cadence, but mechanically generating the cadence itself. Eventually, I accepted that it is the ear that produces cadence, and resolved to depend on my ear for producing it. But lately I have been focusing mostly on clarity, not trying to write in a certain style. I think, however, that I ought to focus more on style, not neglecting clarity.
    Last edited by lumino; January 9th, 2020 at 09:54 PM.

  2. #2
    This vision of yours is interesting. I think you should definitely go with it. The only idea I have is to perhaps start with a rhythm and add words to it as they come to you while listening to it over and over again. For example, a piece of music without words that appeals to you (google "dance club beats"). Or something else with a rhythm such as the clothes dryer or dishwasher running, rain, someone hammering, whatever's around that inspires. Good luck with it.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Ma'am View Post
    This vision of yours is interesting. I think you should definitely go with it. The only idea I have is to perhaps start with a rhythm and add words to it as they come to you while listening to it over and over again. For example, a piece of music without words that appeals to you (google "dance club beats"). Or something else with a rhythm such as the clothes dryer or dishwasher running, rain, someone hammering, whatever's around that inspires. Good luck with it.
    Thanks for the encouragement.

  4. #4
    There probably isn't a formula, per se, but if you read your prose aloud, you can hear what needs to be done to provide rhythm and pacing. Shorter lines are good for intense action; longer lines for calmer scenes.

  5. #5
    Internal rhyme and alliteration at the same point in succeeding lines can help. I think you are right to trust your ear though. the information available to judge by that way far excels any mechanical rule.
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  6. #6
    How about finding a piece of classical music with a section that fits the mood need to display. Examine the notes and tempo and try to match words to fit. This is probably what it's like to write a song.
    K.S. Crooks- Dreamer and Author

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