Rereading and editing what you've written so far


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Thread: Rereading and editing what you've written so far

  1. #1

    Rereading and editing what you've written so far

    I just started a new draft of my WIP and am completing the fourth chapter. The previous one was rushed and had inconsistencies as well as errors and poor character development. This one, however, is probably better. I expanded more on the characters and gave them goals as well as more distinguishable voices, at least to me.
    Anyway, I was thinking about rereading what I've written so far, checking for anything that changes unintentionally later, and possible any errors. I know that is usually discouraged, at least the spelling, grammar, and other basic editing. However, I tend to make too many errors when I write and don't catch them till it's too late, sometimes even over a year later. I do use a read-aloud feature on my Word program. But even then, I can miss a few errors.
    As for the inconsistencies, I think it's probably not a bad idea to reread what I've written so far and make sure nothing in inconsistent or forgotten about later. I get that many writers would say to keep writing and edit after. I do agree with that, too. However, I don't want to catch any flaws, plot holes, or errors when it's too late. My goal is to rid them all as carefully as possible.
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  2. #2
    I edit as I go. I don't expect things to be perfect but I do scan backwards while writing and check things for basic errors and style inconsistencies. If I didn't - and I have tried - then when it comes time to reread, I get wobbled right out of the story.


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  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by sunaynaprasad View Post
    As for the inconsistencies, I think it's probably not a bad idea to reread what I've written so far and make sure nothing in inconsistent or forgotten about later. I get that many writers would say to keep writing and edit after. I do agree with that, too. However, I don't want to catch any flaws, plot holes, or errors when it's too late. My goal is to rid them all as carefully as possible.
    I typically write one chapter at a time, get it all down, then I'll go back and re-read what I wrote and do some editing and touching up. I personally like re-reading what I wrote even if that might be frowned upon by some writers. I'm scatter brained some time, I like to ramble sometimes, and I always forget things. So I read each chapter after I write and tweak if I need to. I think it totally depends on you and your writing style, if you like to reread what you've written then you do that!
    Blogging, writing, and more writing at Hidden Content . Book coming soon!

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by sunaynaprasad View Post
    I just started a new draft of my WIP and am completing the fourth chapter. The previous one was rushed and had inconsistencies as well as errors and poor character development. This one, however, is probably better. I expanded more on the characters and gave them goals as well as more distinguishable voices, at least to me.
    Anyway, I was thinking about rereading what I've written so far, checking for anything that changes unintentionally later, and possible any errors. I know that is usually discouraged, at least the spelling, grammar, and other basic editing. However, I tend to make too many errors when I write and don't catch them till it's too late, sometimes even over a year later. I do use a read-aloud feature on my Word program. But even then, I can miss a few errors.
    As for the inconsistencies, I think it's probably not a bad idea to reread what I've written so far and make sure nothing in inconsistent or forgotten about later. I get that many writers would say to keep writing and edit after. I do agree with that, too. However, I don't want to catch any flaws, plot holes, or errors when it's too late. My goal is to rid them all as carefully as possible.
    It sounds as if you're pants'ing (writing by the seat of your pants) - have you tried writing out the plot in advance instead?

    A plot is just a sketch of what you're planning to write. Beyond major plot points it often includes characters and notes on the world you are writing about.

    I'm a plotter, and a fairly detailed one at that, but during my first draft I allow my characters the latitude to surprise me (which they usually do). By plotting I know beforehand what things I need to research before I actually put pen to paper (figuratively speaking). With all of that out of the way up front, the story just comes without worry or restriction.

    We all have our unique process. Many find plotting the story out in advance takes away their creativity and the joy of the unexpected coming up as they write. Others, like me, find pants'ing crazy enough that the story wanders all over the place and often never gets completed. All I'm saying is that if you've not used plotting as a tool, maybe you should try it.

  5. #5
    Do what suits you in that regard. As a college English instructor, I proofread and polish the daylights out of my chapters before I even finish them. I spend a lot of time fine-tuning my wording in one paragraph before moving to the next. I couldn't work any other way...and it has helped.
    Author of CIBA 'Clue Awards' Semifinalist The Lone Escapist, published by Read Lips Press, available on Amazon.
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    Dan Rhys - Author
    Hidden Content

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Rhys View Post
    Do what suits you in that regard. As a college English instructor, I proofread and polish the daylights out of my chapters before I even finish them. I spend a lot of time fine-tuning my wording in one paragraph before moving to the next. I couldn't work any other way...and it has helped.
    I do something similar. I plot ahead, then correct as I write and go back over it several times before moving on to the next chapter. I work with MS Word, and will use the text to speech tool to listen to my work, which helps me pick up errors my eye didn't catch.

  7. #7
    I actually am a plotter and usually can't write without a plan beforehand. After my current chapter, I will write an outline. Maybe I will also add notes for certain details that I could easily forget.

  8. #8
    I write a few pages and go back to edit those. Also, you said possible instead of possibly

    Sent from my SM-N975U using Tapatalk

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by sunaynaprasad View Post
    I just started a new draft of my WIP and am completing the fourth chapter. The previous one was rushed and had inconsistencies as well as errors and poor character development. This one, however, is probably better. I expanded more on the characters and gave them goals as well as more distinguishable voices, at least to me.
    Anyway, I was thinking about rereading what I've written so far, checking for anything that changes unintentionally later, and possible any errors. I know that is usually discouraged, at least the spelling, grammar, and other basic editing. However, I tend to make too many errors when I write and don't catch them till it's too late, sometimes even over a year later. I do use a read-aloud feature on my Word program. But even then, I can miss a few errors.
    As for the inconsistencies, I think it's probably not a bad idea to reread what I've written so far and make sure nothing in inconsistent or forgotten about later. I get that many writers would say to keep writing and edit after. I do agree with that, too. However, I don't want to catch any flaws, plot holes, or errors when it's too late. My goal is to rid them all as carefully as possible.
    You finally got one and that was a wise decision. I would try out observing people, places, and things. But particularly people if it helps. I think I was able to transition much better when I followed stephen king's advice. But I am waiting for people's reactions for that one. I haven't finished reading the book on advice on how to edit myself. But I also liked what it said on filters. The advice I said is time-consuming but worth it. It makes composition easy and frankly I will do it every time if it yields results. If I need to carry a notebook to places I go to.

    https://www.writingforums.com/thread...o-stephen-king
    I would follow as in believe in the words of good moral leaders. Rather than the beliefs of oneself.
    The most difficult thing for a writer to comprehend is to experience silence, so speak up. (quoted from a member)

  10. #10
    I find it helps to step away from a project, then come back to later. That's when I usually find issues.

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