"There's a lot of footage that never make the cut." - is this grammatically correct?


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Thread: "There's a lot of footage that never make the cut." - is this grammatically correct?

  1. #1

    "There's a lot of footage that never make the cut." - is this grammatically correct?

    I'm confused between "there is a lot of" vs "there are a lot of"...

    Here's an English lesson from Brighton...

    The ambiguity here comes from “a lot of” appearing to be a noun phrase when it’s actually not used in the same way. It is used not as a grouping noun but like a quantifying adverb, like “many”. While a singular verb is appropriate with nouns that define the plural into a singular group, “a lot of” refers to a quantity rather than a grouped unit – modifying the verb as “many” would. So the verb agrees with the noun that “a lot of” qualifies, rather than “a lot”. We can therefore have either “are a lot of” or “is a lot of” depending on the noun. Mostly, we will use “There are a lot of” with countable nouns, when we discuss plurals, and “There is a lot of” with uncountable nouns.

    There are a lot of apples.
    There is a lot of meat.


    It’s deceptive, but a good example of how exceptions to some of the simple rules of English can work – because words can be used for functions that are not what they immediately appear to be.
    So then by applying this rule, I was confused how to phrase the following sentence.

    Option 1: There’s a lot of footage that never make the cut.

    Option 2: There's a lot of footage that never makes the cut.


    The first one seems grammatically correct, but somehow it sounds wrong to me... the second one sounds right, but it seems grammatically incorrect. Please let me know which one you'd choose to go with.

  2. #2
    It is a lot of footage. 'a' shows it is singular, one particular lot of footage, that which never makes the cut.

    You can make it plural by saying 'There are many feet which never make the cut'
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  3. #3
    Member technicalbob's Avatar
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    Option two sounds better if it's a sentence you need to use.

    The word 'that' could be removed for brevity.

    A lot of footage never makes the cut.
    Or
    A lot of footage never made the cut.

    There are a ton of other sentence constructions you could use instead.

  4. #4
    Of the two options listed in the original post, I'd definitely use the second one (in the US).

  5. #5
    There's a lot of footage that never makes the cut.

    Or:

    There's a lot of footage that never made the cut.

    The problem with understanding people is: the more you understand, the less you will believe in miracles.

  6. #6

  7. #7
    Agreed with above, second option sounds better

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Ralph Rotten View Post
    Clearly the correct one is #2.
    Footage is plural.
    Two things, it is 'a lot', singular, that counts, not what it is of. Second the 's' on 'makes' is not a plural, 'make' is a verb not a noun. Look
    'Jim, make the cut' they say, and Jim makes the cut. It alters the tense, not the quantity.

    Right but wrong reason.
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  9. #9
    WF Veteran Bloggsworth's Avatar
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    "...never makes the cut..." Singular "lot" so it makes.
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  10. #10
    I agree with Olly. This is a tense issue, the rules are pretty consistent.

    "Betty decided to make a cake." > Future

    "Betty makes a cake." > Present

    "Betty made a cake." > Past

    ---


    "There will be a lot of footage that will never make the cut." > Future

    "There is a lot of footage that never makes the cut." > Present

    "There was a lot of footage that never made the cut." > Past

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