Lou + loser = ?


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Thread: Lou + loser = ?

  1. #1

    Lou + loser = ?

    One little question:

    Lou, a minor character in my script, is arguing with his brother, Tim. At one point Tim, who is of the opinion that his brother is a loser, refers to him as such, by combining the words "Lou" and "loser".

    How should this be written? "Lou-ser"/"Lou...ser" doesn't look right, nor does "Lou-zer"/"Lou...zer".

    I went with the second, but every time I come across it, it looks wrong.

    Keep in mind that this is a script. I doubt it would work at all otherwise.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by KenTR View Post
    One little question:

    Lou, a minor character in my script, is arguing with his brother, Tim. At one point Tim, who is of the opinion that his brother is a loser, refers to him as such, by combining the words "Lou" and "loser".

    How should this be written? "Lou-ser"/"Lou...ser" doesn't look right, nor does "Lou-zer"/"Lou...zer".

    I went with the second, but every time I come across it, it looks wrong.

    Keep in mind that this is a script. I doubt it would work at all otherwise.

    Thanks.

    As it's a script you might get away with it so long as you make the pronunciation clear with a footnote or a note by the text - otherwise it might be read as lowser (ow sound as in how). However, I've no experience with writing scripts so may be way off.


  3. #3
    Like Phil says, if it's a script the main thing is that it's phonetically correct and the pun is understandable. If this was a regular novel or what-snot I'd say 'Lou-ser" is the only acceptable way. Put it in italics the way most non-english or [sic] words are formatted and introduce it in a way that makes it obvious how it is supposed to be pronounced and its meaning:

    "You're such a loser!" Tim exclaimed, then grinned, "Lou...ser! That's your new name! Lou-ser!"
    (I don't think you'd have a problem with people mistaking it as being pronounced 'lowser' if you put a hyphen between Lou and ser to make Lou-ser)

  4. #4
    I'd like to avoid using too many footnotes, and I agree that the hyphen doesn't work. The italics do look better. The original line, "I don't know, Lou..ser" is meant to be spoken in a petulant way, so perhaps italicizing the second syllable will highlight that.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by KenTR View Post
    I'd like to avoid using too many footnotes, and I agree that the hyphen doesn't work. The italics do look better. The original line, "I don't know, Lou..ser" is meant to be spoken in a petulant way, so perhaps italicizing the second syllable will highlight that.
    Here's a thought: might the storyline and characterisation enable one to sarcastically call the other one "Sir". I'm thinking along the lines of "...Lou-SIR!..." (capitalised to indicate louder voice).


  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Istine View Post
    Here's a thought: might the storyline and characterisation enable one to sarcastically call the other one "Sir". I'm thinking along the lines of "...Lou-SIR!..." (capitalised to indicate louder voice).
    That would also work, being as Lou is the older brother trying to boss Tim around.

  7. #7
    Or you could give up the pun and just have him be called "Loser Lou" or "Lou the Loser."

  8. #8
    That's another possibility. I'll just stick with what I have right now and see how I feel about it somewhere down the road.

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