WARNING: Discusses sexual violence: Do my villains have to have a tragic backstories? - Page 11


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Thread: WARNING: Discusses sexual violence: Do my villains have to have a tragic backstories?

  1. #101
    Quote Originally Posted by ironpony View Post
    I was rewriting the dialogue and thinking about what was said before that the dialogue is probably the reasons why the villains are not believable to the readers, but I am thinking if the dialogue is the problem, then wouldn't the readers say that it's the dialogue, and not the villains motivation?
    A lot of readers don't have a clue what doesn't work for them, and in fairness it's not really their job to explain it. It's your job to figure it out.

    As somebody who has read excerpt of your work, I can safely say (as I did at the time...) that your dialogue is a problem. All of your characters sound like you do in these threads.

    Whether it's your only problem, I don't know & suspect not -- it could well be both poor dialogue AND lack of a credible motive being evident.

  2. #102
    Okay thanks. I keep on working to make the dialogue better and hope to improve it. I was told before not have the characters all speak differently but I'm afraid of going too overboard, since the characters are all from around the same city and all.

    As for motivation, I could change the villains motivation but I don't know where to start though. When you have a premise of a group of villains going around committing these crimes, what motivations could I use, if wanting revenge for involuntary celibacy is not good enough?

    I just feel I need to know which ones would be believable so I could choose between the believable ones.

  3. #103
    Quote Originally Posted by ironpony View Post
    My story is a thriller, with a group of villains going around committing rapes, which the police are trying catch. I wrote it so their motivation was that they are doing it as revenge cause they have involuntary celibacy and that is why they are doing it, as revenge.

    However, a couple of people said this wasn't enough motivation and for them to do this, they have to been raped as well, and one suggested that I should write it so that the villains were gang raped in the army or something like that would help make it a lot more believable. But I feel that changes a lot around though. I also don't know if I like the tragic backstory as it's been done to death by now, and can't villains just be villains without a backstory that is much more tragic? Or do I need the tragic backtstory for this kind of motivation for this kind of crime do you think?
    I disagree, it sounds like enough motivation, but you can always make it more potent. Various methods.

  4. #104
    Oh okay thanks. What do you mean by more potent in this context?

  5. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by luckyscars View Post
    that your dialogue is a problem. All of your characters sound like you do in these threads.
    This is one of the things that I fear to read in a feedback...

  6. #106
    Well it's just I feel if I make the characters different in speech it will be too obvious, when they are all from the same city or around there. If I give them all very different vernaculars, won't it come off strange, as to why they have such different vernaculars, if they are all suppose to be from the same area?

  7. #107
    Quote Originally Posted by ironpony View Post
    Well it's just I feel if I make the characters different in speech it will be too obvious, when they are all from the same city or around there. If I give them all very different vernaculars, won't it come off strange, as to why they have such different vernaculars, if they are all suppose to be from the same area?
    Do all of your friends talk in EXACTLY the same way? Next time you're hanging out with a group of friends, pay special attention. I'm sure there will be some shorthand of shared speech patterns (shorthand "inside joke" level of talk between you), but underneath that, you'll probably find that each of your friends has a distinct and unique voice.

    Also, there's nothing wrong with giving a character an affectation... just because. For example, one of my friends is as American, and more specifically midwestern, as they come. However, he has relatives that are Irish and he not-so-secretly wishes he had been raised in an environment that gave him an accent. So he purposefully gives himself a slight Irish inflection, just because he likes it.

    As a creative writer, it's your job to find ways to make your characters distinct and unique from one another.

  8. #108
    Okay sure. It's strange cause all the characters sound different than me. I will try to do it without going overboard.

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