Does the poem stand alone from the poet? - Page 2


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Thread: Does the poem stand alone from the poet?

  1. #11
    WF Veteran Bloggsworth's Avatar
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    It may or may not. I was congratulated on my poem about Tuscany, on how I had captured it, how acute were my observations, trouble is, I had never been near the place, probably about 1,000 miles or so when we flew from Malta to Cyprus in 1954. In fact, I've never been to continenetal Europe, the nearest being Dover... Once.

    It is perfectly possible for a poet to seperate imagination and experience, the two may never meet on a daily basis. Some writers have their personalty and sexual, religious or political leanings a consistent thread running through their writings. Was Nabakov a peadophile? No, but he was a considerable expert on the penises of butterflies...
    A man in possession of a wooden spoon must be in want of a pot to stir.

  2. #12
    sorry, pardon my faux pas.... but I thought the OP was about separating the poet from his poetry...

    I understood the question to be something like this: IF, knowing something about a poet, would that knowledge change one's perception of the poet's work... anyway... that is what I thought Olly was asking...
    She lost herself in the trees,
    among the ever-changing leaves.
    She wept beneath the wild sky
    as stars told stories of ancient times.
    The flowers grew toward her light,
    the river called her name at night.
    She could not live an ordinary life,
    with the mysteries of the universe
    hidden in her eyes....
    Author: Christy Ann Martine

    Death leaves a heartache no one can heal,
    love leaves a memory no one can steal....
    Author unknown.

  3. #13
    What if the question was backwards? Famous poets, older poets and good poets are known to you, how many of the poets here are? We recognize a poets style, their subject matter(genre?) much line a painter. I plead ignorance and ineptitude. Sometimes I think I recognize one of our poets poems but to me that’s unimportant. The poem is important. What does it mean? Why does it mean that? Could we be clouding our perspective based on history of a poet? Then again I don’t venture into the deep end very often. I loved all the points that have been made here.
    "Illegitimi non carborundum " Vinegar' Joe Stilwell

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  4. #14
    Clark, I am not sure that it is necessary to grasp a poet’s intent in order to grasp the poem’s gestalt. Or perhaps there are different ways to understand intent. Intent can be revealed in the poem, and if it is not revealed, perhaps that is because the poet did not intend to reveal his intent. How’s that for a semantic twist? I think of John Ashbury and even Ron Peat. I would even suggest that many poems are written where the authors don’t even understand their own intent themselves. Intent is revealed in the act of writing, or perhaps only years later. So I’m not sure how readers in this case would benefit by knowing anything about the poet. Of course, if you read a poet long enough you start to recognize their voice and style. But does that, in itself, give you deeper insight into the poem?

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Firemajic View Post
    sorry, pardon my faux pas.... but I thought the OP was about separating the poet from his poetry...

    I understood the question to be something like this: IF, knowing something about a poet, would that knowledge change one's perception of the poet's work... anyway... that is what I thought Olly was asking...
    Indeed, I got in a muddle and thought I was on your other thread about Wilfred Owen's poem. A lesson for me there when reading in separate sessions: scroll back and check.

    In brief, I can appreciate a poem more when knowing something of the writer. An understanding of the possible reasons why a poet writes a particular way can be gleaned by knowing something of the poet's life - sometimes. For example, with some of Owen's war poems I can feel empathy for his situation, even though I've never been to a war zone. With Heaney's account of his younger brother's death (Mid-Term Break) in a car accident, I can feel the numbness of shock, but it's probably enhanced by the knowledge that this really happened.

    So, yes, knowing something about as poet can add to a poem and give an enhanced perception.


  6. #16
    When a rockstar or film star says I'm shy by nature I just think behave...as for poets the the word I should be replaced with three words..me,me,me
    The only one who can heal you is you.




  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by clark View Post
    Olly -- You're diabolical, Olly Buckle!
    .
    You are too kind, I try.

    Hey, Phil, sorry mate, but you were ripped, Wilfred Owen's poems is a charity shop regular, you should get a perfect copy for about 20p tops. On the other hand of course, how can you put a value on something like that, and a copy that's been loved and read.
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  8. #18
    Oh ESC! Do rein in your one-line shots at how much poets at large get your shorts in a knot! Do you seriously think poets and their work are some kind of egotistical conspiracy to undermine REAL writing? Poets are the most vulnerable of all writers, because they reveal so much of their inner lives, their fears and failures, hopes and dreams, in between the lines of everything they write. That takes guts, real guts. "me, me, me" indeed. Nonsense. How about YOU putting your sentiments on the line: write an essay arguing . . .whatever. . .position you wish to argue, about poets and poetry. We would all enjoy your thinking about the issue. And we could probably ALL learn something along the way . Think about it, please.



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  9. #19
    Poets are the most vulnerable of all writers, because they reveal so much of their inner lives, their fears and failures, hopes and dreams, in between the lines of everything they write.
    In that case poets really are inseparable from what they write, but surely this is only one sort of poetry, how about the poem about an historical event that has caught the poet's imagination, or the sort of poem Bloggsworth wrote about Tuscany, or mine about Australia which The Backward Ox said he felt could only have been written by a native Australian, when I have never been there either?
    Visit my website to read and connect to my 'soundcloud', where you can listen to stories songs and more
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  10. #20
    It's tuff being a luvy
    The only one who can heal you is you.




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