The Science Of Thor's Hammer.


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Thread: The Science Of Thor's Hammer.

  1. #1
    Member Rojack79's Avatar
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    The Science Of Thor's Hammer.

    So I'm working on another writing project and I'm doing some research at the moment. Now my findings are I feel rather bland in comparison to the mythological methods of creating Thor's Hammer but I wanted to see if a real world parallel could be made. And so I set about my work.

    And found only two non radioactive metals that could be used when creating a real life moljner, Tungsten the best metal when it comes to resisting heat, and Iridium the best metal for resisting acids. Plus they are both super heavy and conductive of electricity.

    Now my only issue is figuring out how much this hammer would weigh. I know that someone made a real world replica of Thor's Hammer out of tungsten but Iridium is extremely rare on earth. In fact some of the only bits of it we have if memory serves come from meteorites.

    So besides the fact that I won't be able to get any kind of samples to test out my theory of just how heavy this hammer would be I figured I'd ask on here to see if anyone is a geometry/mechanic/volume wizard.

    My version of Thor's Hammer is pretty big, about the size of a sledgehammer with a similar head style although I will be taking some liberty with the overall design. The dimensions of the head are hopefully realistic. The hammer head is about 6 inches long x 4 inches wide x 4 inches high.

    Right now my brain is to tired thanks to a new work schedule and I really can't hope to factor in the two separate densities of Tungsten & Iridium at the moment to see just how heavy this thing is. If anyone can help it would be most appreciated.
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  2. #2
    You can punch the numbers into this calculator. Not unliftablely heavy it seems, 30-35 kgs.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by epimetheus View Post
    You can punch the numbers into this calculator. Not unliftablely heavy it seems, 30-35 kgs.

    Especially not for a Norse god, and the strongest one among them at that.

  4. #4
    Swords have been made from meteorite iron. Google it.
    This could have been viewed as metal from the gods, used to fashion a weapon for a king.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Ralph Rotten View Post
    Swords have been made from meteorite iron. Google it.
    This could have been viewed as metal from the gods, used to fashion a weapon for a king.
    A real world example of this concept being Tut's iron dagger.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tutank...ic_iron_dagger

  6. #6
    Member Rojack79's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CyberWar View Post
    Especially not for a Norse god, and the strongest one among them at that.
    True but sadly even Thor needed gauntlets of strength and a belt of power to wield his own hammer, which is interesting in its own right. I may just have to make the hammer out of some fictional metal and call it a day. But I can still science this fictional metal until I'm satisfied. Let me look into this real quick.
    This might not be my best work but that just means there's room to improve.

    I don't have a big ego. You just can't comprehend my greatness!

  7. #7
    Member Rojack79's Avatar
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    Ok so here's my list of fictional metal's i plan on using.

    Adamant/Adamantine: A mythical metal from Greece that is indestructible once shaped into a tool for use. In my universe this will be the normal properties of this metal but I plan on making it heavier than steel instead of lighter like most renditions.

    Orichalcum: Another example of a Greek metal, this one is associated with Atlantis more than mainland greece but it is still used in Greek mythology.

    Mythril: This is an ultra light, and stronger than steel metal used in a variety of media. I plan on using it as well but I'm going to scrutinize it before I do.

    Meteoric/Thunderbolt Iron: This real life material is just as it says. Iron that comes from meteorites. But in fiction as with my own story it will have some magical properties associated with it. Will have to think on just what those properties could be.

    Really Mercury: I know this is a hoax material but I have a plan on how I can use it in the production of some things such as Greek fire and other strange weapons.

    This is probably a good list to start off with and then I can expand it as I go along.
    Last edited by Rojack79; November 13th, 2019 at 05:56 PM.
    This might not be my best work but that just means there's room to improve.

    I don't have a big ego. You just can't comprehend my greatness!

  8. #8
    Yes, I think that is a good starting point, don't think you need much more.
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  9. #9
    Adamant: A mythical metal from Greece
    No, he's that pop star with the stripe across his face

    Don't forget the flaw, in the case of Thor's mythical hammer it was a short handle because of Loki's interference, but an imperfection adds something.
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