So much advice, so many options- where do i start


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Thread: So much advice, so many options- where do i start

  1. #1

    So much advice, so many options- where do i start

    Hi all,
    New to this site, but seems fantastic after a little look about.
    I have just finished my first draft of my first book, i am a late bloomer at 46.
    It turns out writing the first draft of the book was the easy part, as it was all in my head aleady.
    the hard part is what next.
    Self publish, get a agent, get a publisher, get a editor, all advice i have been given by selling authors, but never the same.
    I am starting from the beginning, fine tuning the book to a point i am happy with.
    So i have got a bit of time to figure it all out.
    Thanks

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by HandinHandTogether View Post
    Hi all,
    New to this site, but seems fantastic after a little look about.
    I have just finished my first draft of my first book, i am a late bloomer at 46.
    It turns out writing the first draft of the book was the easy part, as it was all in my head aleady.
    the hard part is what next.
    Self publish, get a agent, get a publisher, get a editor, all advice i have been given by selling authors, but never the same.
    I am starting from the beginning, fine tuning the book to a point i am happy with.
    So i have got a bit of time to figure it all out.
    Thanks
    This is a novel?

    I think it's important to look at yourself and your strengths and weaknesses and interests. All the different answers you've heard from different people could very well be true, for the person giving the advice. They won't all be true for you.

    Do you have an entrepreneurial spirit? Are you comfortable promoting yourself, playing around with pricing and marketing and spending at least as much time on the "publishing" as on the writing? Self-publishing may be for you.

    Are you writing in a commercial genre and is your work of a sort that is likely to sell well? An agent is the key to getting in the door at the big publishers. But if you're writing for a niche market or in a unique style, you may not be able to gain the interest of a large publisher but may want to consider smaller publishers.

    For me? When I write YA and het romance, I go through an agent who pursues sales to Big Five publishers. When I write m/m romance, I work with small publishers or, now that I've built up a bit of a name, self-publish. This is a path that (I think) makes sense for me, and for what I write. But your path may very well be different.

  3. #3
    I would never send anything out without getting other eyes on it first. I suggest getting critiques or beta reads after you have polished it the best you can yourself. Don't take other people's advice over your own judgment but do listen to what a few others have to say. You'll probably be surprised at how much they'll catch that you didn't. Good luck.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by HandinHandTogether View Post
    Hi all,
    New to this site, but seems fantastic after a little look about.
    I have just finished my first draft of my first book, i am a late bloomer at 46.
    It turns out writing the first draft of the book was the easy part, as it was all in my head aleady.
    the hard part is what next.
    Self publish, get a agent, get a publisher, get a editor, all advice i have been given by selling authors, but never the same.
    I am starting from the beginning, fine tuning the book to a point i am happy with.
    So i have got a bit of time to figure it all out.
    Thanks
    Unless you have the knowledge and the financial and time means to finesse and promote your work, I would caution against self-publishing.

    There are so many self-published books out there and the big reason for that is it's easy and cheap. Anybody can spend twenty minutes on KDP and 'publish' their book in a rudimentary form. I did it myself (for fun) and found it absurdly easy to do. If I wanted to I could, right now, self-publish all of my work and have a published oeuvre comparable to Stephen King's.

    Two reasons why I don't: Number one, I don't have the time or money to make sure those books will sell. They will sit together with thousands (millions?) of other 'published' books on Amazon and not sell hardly anything because I simply do not have the time or resources to make them professional nor promote them in a professional manner. Number two: Shoving all my work haphazardly into the marketplace only damages their value in the long run. Most anthologies and publishers of novels want exclusivity and work that has never been sold before. By violating that, and achieving some pretty underwhelming sales, I am invalidating any reason for a prospective future publisher to be interested. Why would they want to touch a book that has already been 'published' and not sold much? They don't know that the reason for the crappy sales was because I didn't promote it, and even if they do know that it doesn't exactly reflect well on me.

    Like Bayview and Ma'am say, take this stage slowly. If you have only just finished the first draft you're a long way from having the book ready to be published or even thinking about it too much. I wrote the first draft of my current novel 2 years ago and am only just getting toward the query point. Granted, I took a break from it, but good work takes time. Once you have your first draft done the next stage is to rewrite it. I can almost guarantee it's not up to publishable standards yet. The road to hell is paved with writers who rushed into publishing the moment they wrote 'THE END'. Don't be that guy (or girl).

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