What grammar and spell check - Page 2


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Thread: What grammar and spell check

  1. #11
    Honestly, I wouldn't worry about them stealing your writing. It's pretty hard to even give stories away so they're about the dumbest possible thing for anyone to steal.

    If it helps, having their unpublished writing stolen is something newer writers seem to worry about quite a bit and more established writers seem to not worry about much at all.

    Even if someone did steal it, if it ever came to light, you'd just have to tell the publisher and it would likely be removed immediately.

    It is rare and usually only attempted by total doofuses, in my experience. Once I was on a forum and one of my forum pals said someone had changed a few words and the title and published her (the forum pal's) book under her (the doofus's) own name. We all zoomed right over to Amazon and insulted the thief in the comments section until the stolen book disappeared and that was the end of it.

    Also, that book was already published. So you see, anyone could steal your writing even after it's published. However, they probably wouldn't get far with it.

    But just for peace of mind, you could google their name and see if any complaints come up. Good luck.
    Last edited by Ma'am; November 10th, 2019 at 08:39 PM.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Biro View Post
    What grammar and spell check do you all use? I keep getting conflicting results from 'Word' (different versions) and 'Grammarly'.
    I just use the standard one in the word processor that I'm using. This is usually MS Word or even MS Works sometimes. On this forum there is a basic spellchecker. I make sure that any spellchecker is set to the appropriate version of English - in my case, British English.
    I think it's important to realise that manual override is reasonable because, occasionally, a glitch will throw up some anomaly. This is more likely with grammar than spelling. Sometimes, the correct way of writing something isn't necessarily the best way if a particular effect is desired.


  3. #13
    Thank you and I agree with you entirely. I did look for reviews and the results are mixed.

    But back to the original point. Are we just down to only 'one' grammar checker? Besides obviously MS.
    Last edited by Biro; November 10th, 2019 at 10:06 AM.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Istine View Post
    I just use the standard one in the word processor that I'm using. This is usually MS Word or even MS Works sometimes. On this forum there is a basic spellchecker. I make sure that any spellchecker is set to the appropriate version of English - in my case, British English.
    I think it's important to realise that manual override is reasonable because, occasionally, a glitch will throw up some anomaly. This is more likely with grammar than spelling. Sometimes, the correct way of writing something isn't necessarily the best way if a particular effect is desired.
    I did this. I tried 3 different spell and grammar checkers and they each highlighted a whole load of more and different 'errors'?

    This led me to post this topic on the forum.

  5. #15
    This might sound old school, but I honestly think the best way to tighten up SPAG is to have your story workshopped and listen to the feedback, especially when it's from people who might know a thing or two about it. If it's a real issue, consider hiring a human proofreader or editor.

    I find a lot of these 'grammarly' type sites are OK, but they're not really made for fiction. They're designed for professional writing which is supposed to be quite bland and uniform. Writing fiction has a lot more tolerance for questionable SPAG - so long as it 'works'.

    I mean, I've run stories I've had published professionally through such programs and the results have spun my head and made me question whether I'm an idiot or not and, in some cases, the red-lines are correct...in others, though, they're identifying aspects that are intrinsic to the voice, or at least not a Big Deal in fiction. So either way, you're still going to have to ultimately make the call on whether to obey the suggestions or not.

    A good example is sentence fragments. Every A.I based checker will identify these as needing fixed but sentence fragments are entirely acceptable in fiction (again, with the caveat they must 'work') and if you go around 'correcting' sentences left and right you may well lose something crucial. Often programs like Grammarly will call out 'weak' sentences based on passive voice or run on sentences or whatever-whatever and, again, these may or may not be totally fine for the kind of story it is.

    So I guess what I'm saying is...you can use these things, they're not bad as a quick way to obtain feedback - I personally use the Word spellchecker a lot - but don't rely on them or waste time trying to find a magic wand that will fix your writing. The best way to write well is to read a lot, write a lot, and listen to feedback.
    "If you don't like my peaches, don't shake my tree."

    "Perhaps I write for no one. Perhaps for the same person children are writing for when they scrawl their names in the snow."

  6. #16
    I agree entirely with what you say here. I also have discovered that if you narrate a story which may be perfect in grammar with commas and full stops in the right place, it becomes totally boring and dead.

    The only way life can be put into the story is to smash the sentences to pieces and that is never going to pass any grammar checker.

  7. #17
    I have to say that I need all the help I can get and that is because of my dyslexia. I do think that such tool helps me. I do think that it is each to there own and what works for you.
    my blog: Hidden Content

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