Seeking Advice regarding neogiations for an AudioBook that went wrong - Page 2


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Thread: Seeking Advice regarding neogiations for an AudioBook that went wrong

  1. #11
    WF Veteran Galen's Avatar
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    UPDATE:

    Thanks everyone for your input. Your comments, suggestions and observations were very helpful.

    I think my delay in responding to the narrator's email made him take a look at what he had said. He sent another email apologizing for his mistake. We are now on good footing.

    But, the situation made me reexamine the notes and research I had done awhile back on the audiobook process, the terms, the pricing and more.

    I know that from what I had remembered, I could not figure out how to translate "finished hour" into any kind of formula in order estimate what the cost might be to produce an audio book of my novelette.

    So, I had decided to let the narrator or audio production company tell me what the price was.

    I will admit I was surprised by the original estimate. My book is around 20,000 words.

    But, from my perspective, even after the audio part is done. I will have more work to do and I am butting heads with the new technology concepts and apps regarding the creation and distribution of an audio book.

    As a self-published author, self-publishing a book was hard enough. What do you call the brain stew when your brain can not grasp new concepts? It's like trying to learn a foreign language.

    I am still stuck on "finished hour", what the heck is that?

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  2. #12
    This isn't really what you were asking about but just a thought, you may want to just drop the whole thing unless you're just doing it for kicks. Self-published work doesn't usually bring in much money so if you're not careful, what profits there are (and then some) can easily end up all going to the peripheral helpers rather than to you, the author.

    I did the audiobook thing on one of my books and now several years later, I doubt I've gotten the money back on audiobook sales that I paid to the voice actor. In any case, good luck if you do it and let us know how it goes.
    Last edited by Ma'am; October 22nd, 2019 at 08:46 PM.

  3. #13
    Double post.
    Last edited by Ma'am; October 22nd, 2019 at 11:07 PM.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Galen View Post
    I am still stuck on "finished hour", what the heck is that?

    The term “per finished hour” refers to the number of actual edited and mastered hours the project clocks in on its finished presentation. So, if an audiobook of 85,000 + words is six hours and 30 minutes long then the voice talent is paid for six hours and 30 minutes only. The other fees mentioned above as well as a fee for the voice talent altering his/her natural voice to account for different characters can also be added. Therefore, the cost per finished hour on the six hour and 30 minute audiobook I mentioned can range from $250 – $450 per finished hour.
    Taken from here.

    ACX does this or you. You type in your word count: 20,000, then they do the calculation. E.g., mine at 144,059 words = 15.4 hours. My narrator then has a per finished hour rate, e.g., 200.00. You then times the pfh by 15.5 etc to get an overall cost. Unless you do either a royalty share plus with ACX where you pay half, then split the royalties that come in, or do pure royalty share, which is splitting the cost once the sales come in. But those options are only available through ACX. If you're going private, then you'll more than likely pay upfront, which some authors do.

    Good luck, and let us know how you get on!!
    "You don't wanna ride the bus like this,"

    Mike Posner.



  5. #15
    Also, just my opinion, but I wouldn't want to be involved in a shared royalty deal with someone forever when I was self-publishing, so I paid the full fee.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Ma'am View Post
    Also, just my opinion, but I wouldn't want to be involved in a shared royalty deal with someone forever when I was self-publishing, so I paid the full fee.
    It's not forever. You sign a contract for seven years, which is long enough to earn the money both ways. Can be, but no guarantee!

    How did sales on yours go, Ma'am? Did you earn the money back you put into production?
    "You don't wanna ride the bus like this,"

    Mike Posner.



  7. #17
    WF Veteran Galen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ma'am View Post
    This isn't really what you were asking about but just a thought, you may want to just drop the whole thing unless you're just doing it for kicks. Self-published work doesn't usually bring in much money so if you're not careful, what profits there are (and then some) can easily end up all going to the peripheral helpers rather than to you, the author.

    I did the audiobook thing on one of my books and now several years later, I doubt I've gotten the money back on audiobook sales that I paid to the voice actor. In any case, good luck if you do it and let us know how it goes.
    Hola Ma'am:

    I agree. But, after publishing my first and only novel, I knew from day 1, I wasn't going to recoup any monetary outlays. But, I found it such a great learning experience that I am fine with that. I had so many wonderful experiences meeting new people, participating in a variety of events and activities. I had to learn lots of new software, new processes and so much more, that alone was worth the time and money I spent.

    I feel the same way about the audiobook. In my ignorance, I had, at one time, thought I could do the audio book myself but that would have required an investment into software, hardware and apps, I did not want to make. It was such an undertaking, I almost gave up. So, this venture is just a part of my learning experience. I have more ideas for other formats for my novel. But, they entail costs, too. I have no plans to pursue those formats at this time. But, I hope, in the future, that for some of those formats, I can do some of the work myself, again for the experience. But, all the ideas require a lot of time and a lot of learning new skills etc. I have weigh what projects I spend my time on.

    I appreciate your observations.
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  8. #18
    @Aquilo- Thanks for that. I didn't realize the royalty-sharing was for seven years only. I am not sure if I recouped my voice actor expense on audio sales or not but if so, it's close.

    @Galen- I know what you mean. I make a small income from my writing but really just do it for the fun of it.

  9. #19
    WF Veteran Galen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aquilo View Post
    Taken from here.

    ACX does this or you. You type in your word count: 20,000, then they do the calculation. E.g., mine at 144,059 words = 15.4 hours. My narrator then has a per finished hour rate, e.g., 200.00. You then times the pfh by 15.5 etc to get an overall cost. Unless you do either a royalty share plus with ACX where you pay half, then split the royalties that come in, or do pure royalty share, which is splitting the cost once the sales come in. But those options are only available through ACX. If you're going private, then you'll more than likely pay upfront, which some authors do.

    Good luck, and let us know how you get on!!
    Hola Aquillo:

    Thank you for the specifics. I am going to come back and print out this thread.

    Some things are not clear, how does ACX determine that x number of words will take x number of hours to record?


    Formula is $hourly rate x FHR ( number of hours it takes to read x number of words) = Cost for audiobook


    And this cost includes deliverables like audio files?


    I guess I got the impression in my research that there was dual process to make an audio book. One was to record it. The other was to "merge and edit" the audio files into an audiobook format. So, I thought there were two FHRs.


    So, is there an established FHR for x number words, in general? A Rule of thumb or something? I had seen estimates but they seemed to vary greatly and that is where I got lost.
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  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Galen View Post
    Some things are not clear, how does ACX determine that x number of words will take x number of hours to record?


    Formula is $hourly rate x FHR ( number of hours it takes to read x number of words) = Cost for audiobook

    is there an established FHR for x number words, in general? A Rule of thumb or something? I had seen estimates but they seemed to vary greatly and that is where I got lost.
    This is from ACX

    On average, most performers narrate about 9,300 words per hour. Divide the total number of words in your book by 9,300 to find out approximately how long your finished Audiobook will be. When you create a Title Profile on ACX, the length is automatically calculated for you, based on the word count you provide.
    Some narrators may differ. though. You can use this to ask your narrator, though: how many word per hour he works with. Ideally he should be providing you with this information upfront so you're able to work it out.
    Last edited by Aquilo; October 23rd, 2019 at 09:29 AM.
    "You don't wanna ride the bus like this,"

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