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Thread: The Seventies Thread

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Trollheart View Post


    As I'll point out VERY soon in my new Heavy Metal thread (you heard it here first, folks!) it's generally accepted that Black Sabbath invented heavy metal in 1970. Anything before that, though heavy, was called hard rock or heavy rock. Steppenwolf coined the term, but it was some music journalist who sarcastically referred to the sound of Sabbath as "like a load of heavy metal falling on me" or something. So yeah, 1970 was when heavy metal first snarled its baby cries.
    Perhaps 1970 was when the term 'heavy metal' was coined, but don't tell me Iron Butterfly or 1969 Led Zeppelin wasn't heavy metal, even if the latter was blues based.

    Reggae came to England in around the 1950s, with the immigrants from Jamaica and so on moving into London, but I would imagine it's been around for a whole lot longer than that in the Caribbean. As a popular music form though, again you're probably talking late 1960s or early 1970s, with Marley, Dekker and Steel Pulse leading the way into the charts. Pop music you could not qualify, as by its very nature it's just defined as what is in vogue, but you're probably looking back to the birth of rock and roll, again in the 1950s.
    Actually pop music may have been coined as such in the post war forties with artists like Perry Como and Dinah Shore dominating the charts at that time

    Disco definitely came of age in the early 1970s, as an offshoot and more popular branch of soul and r&b, and with the new dance crazes and the nightclubs or discotheques cropping up, so again the seventies have it.
    Yep, and it really took off around 1974. I'm not sure but I think that's when it was actually labeled disco.
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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrmustard615 View Post
    Perhaps 1970 was when the term 'heavy metal' was coined, but don't tell me Iron Butterfly or 1969 Led Zeppelin wasn't heavy metal, even if the latter was blues based.
    Iron Butterfly and Led Zeppelin weren't heavy metal. They couldn't be, as nobody knew what heavy metal was. Looking back now though, I think most people would agree Zep and the Irons were still heavy rock or hard rock (think IB might be psychedelic rock? Not very familiar with them) but no: the music really only came into being when the first doomy notes of "Black Sabbath" rang out on stage, and everyone knew something entirely new was being born. Here, I'll let one of MB's foremost authorities on hard rock and heavy metal explain:

    Up until now all the albums and bands featured, have had heavy blues and psychedelic rock influences, and gradually they have taken those influences to their logical and heavy conclusions throughout 1969 and 1970. But it would be four guys from Birmingham that would reshape those blues and psychedelic tendencies, into a much darker vision that would go on to dominate metaldom as we know it. This darker vision would be based around even tighter guitar riffs, a throbbing rhythm section, morbid doom-laden visions, along with medieval and futuristic themes. The band truly found a hidden malevolence in the blues, that they then fully exploited and then glued the whole thing together with strong occult influences. Now some of these aspects that I've mentioned, had already been displayed by other bands and albums both featured and not featured on here so far, but Black Sabbath would be the first band to pull it all together in a complete morbid package. Their music would display the bleak industrial influences of their native Birmingham and demonstrate itself in all the aforementioned characteristics. But their signature sound would come through in Tonny Iommi's deceptively basic tuned-down guitar riffs and Ozzy Osbourne's trademark banshee shriek, along with Geezer Butler's throbbing bass so essential to the Sabbath sound and last but not least Bill Ward on the drum stool.


    Actually pop music may have been coined as such in the post war forties with artists like Perry Como and Dinah Shore dominating the charts at that time

    Yep, and it really took off around 1974. I'm not sure but I think that's when it was actually labeled disco.
    Agree with both of these though.
    Come away, human child to the waters and the wild
    With a faery hand in hand.
    For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand. - WB Yeats "The Stolen Child"

    I drink to forget, but I never forget to drink.

    "If the real Jesus Christ were to stand up today
    He'd be gunned down cold by the CIA" - The The, "Armageddon Days Are Here (Again)" - Mind Bomb, 1989


    The most destructive force on the planet is not nukes or global warming...it is the human ego. - Ralph Rotten

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Trollheart View Post
    Iron Butterfly and Led Zeppelin weren't heavy metal. They couldn't be, as nobody knew what heavy metal was. Looking back now though, I think most people would agree Zep and the Irons were still heavy rock or hard rock (think IB might be psychedelic rock? Not very familiar with them) but no: the music really only came into being when the first doomy notes of "Black Sabbath" rang out on stage, and everyone knew something entirely new was being born. Here, I'll let one of MB's foremost authorities on hard rock and heavy metal explain:

    Up until now all the albums and bands featured, have had heavy blues and psychedelic rock influences, and gradually they have taken those influences to their logical and heavy conclusions throughout 1969 and 1970. But it would be four guys from Birmingham that would reshape those blues and psychedelic tendencies, into a much darker vision that would go on to dominate metaldom as we know it. This darker vision would be based around even tighter guitar riffs, a throbbing rhythm section, morbid doom-laden visions, along with medieval and futuristic themes. The band truly found a hidden malevolence in the blues, that they then fully exploited and then glued the whole thing together with strong occult influences. Now some of these aspects that I've mentioned, had already been displayed by other bands and albums both featured and not featured on here so far, but Black Sabbath would be the first band to pull it all together in a complete morbid package. Their music would display the bleak industrial influences of their native Birmingham and demonstrate itself in all the aforementioned characteristics. But their signature sound would come through in Tonny Iommi's deceptively basic tuned-down guitar riffs and Ozzy Osbourne's trademark banshee shriek, along with Geezer Butler's throbbing bass so essential to the Sabbath sound and last but not least Bill Ward on the drum stool.

    Hmm. anyone that I know?


    Iron Butterfly was considered psychedelic at the time I believe, but 1968 was a time when almost anything would have gotten that label. They certainly were very heavy. As mentioned, and you know this, Zeppelin was based on Blues and we're originally called the New Yardbirds. There's a video on Youtube of the New Yardbirds with Keith Relf singing Dazed and Confused in fact. It's not bad. I still stand by Link Wray as the father of Heavy Metal though (and probably a pioneer in punk rock too).
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  4. #14
    Listening to 'Sounds of the seventies' there was an announcement that Gilbert O'Sullivan is on tour starting in October. I thought 'Still going' and remembered the first couple of posts here, bet he looks a bit different now, don't we all.
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  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrmustard615 View Post
    Hmm. anyone that I know?


    Iron Butterfly was considered psychedelic at the time I believe, but 1968 was a time when almost anything would have gotten that label. They certainly were very heavy. As mentioned, and you know this, Zeppelin was based on Blues and we're originally called the New Yardbirds. There's a video on Youtube of the New Yardbirds with Keith Relf singing Dazed and Confused in fact. It's not bad. I still stand by Link Wray as the father of Heavy Metal though (and probably a pioneer in punk rock too).
    Quite Unknown, in fact...
    Come away, human child to the waters and the wild
    With a faery hand in hand.
    For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand. - WB Yeats "The Stolen Child"

    I drink to forget, but I never forget to drink.

    "If the real Jesus Christ were to stand up today
    He'd be gunned down cold by the CIA" - The The, "Armageddon Days Are Here (Again)" - Mind Bomb, 1989


    The most destructive force on the planet is not nukes or global warming...it is the human ego. - Ralph Rotten

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Trollheart View Post
    I was born in 1963 so I grew up in the seventies, ...
    I first met my angel in the summer of 1970 and we married in the spring of 1971, so I too grew up in the seventies. She told me that she liked Motown music so naturally I had to gain a rapid appreciation of it and spent hours sitting alone in my car on the drive of my parents' house listening to it on the radio. The things we do for love, but then one so seldom meets an angel during one's life. We both still like Motown and went to see Motown The Musical in a West End theatre in London not so long ago.

    When I was at boarding school the other boys were listening enthusiastically to that new group, the Beatles, on the radio but I couldn't see anything much in their music and still don't. I think it is mainly because they did very little that one can dance to. In contrast the seventies introduced disco and even now (I'm seventy-five in a couple of weeks.) my disco dancing is a subject of conversation amongst onlookers. (Take that how you like.) There is a lot of disco music in our music library, which is now held on our home server in its original CD format with some transferred from vinyl. (For my comments on MP3 see THIS POEM that I submitted to a poetry challenge back in 2017.)

    Quote Originally Posted by Trollheart View Post
    Certainly, some computer music has sterilised the art, but on the other hand, the advances in computer software and indeed hardware over the last forty years has enabled music to be made that bands could only dream of in the seventies.
    Not just bands in the seventies. A grand master of music synthesis was Isao Tomita and I have many of his records. He specifically produced arrangements of classical music and I have a pressing of his version of Holst's Planets Suite made in the USA as Holst's daughter Imogen wouldn't allow it to be released over here in Europe. My thoughts on synthesised versions of the classics is that nobody knows exactly what was in the minds of the old composers and what compromises they had to make to emulate the sounds in their heads using the instruments of the day. Nobody can imagine what someone like Mozart would have produced using a modern synthesiser, so how can anyone say that a synthetic version of a classic is fundamentally wrong? There's nothing fundamentally right about horsehair scraping on catgut where music is concerned. (P.S. Certainly not compared to overloading a Marshall amp anyway.)

    Quote Originally Posted by Irwin View Post
    That's fine if you like synthesized music. I find it sterile and soulless.
    Yes, there was a lot of appalling rubbish produced in the years when synthesisers became cheap enough, so one had to persevere to find the good stuff. I surprised a younger colleague at the office one day when he mentioned that he was a Tangerine Dream fan and I said that I had quite a few of their albums. I think I normally come over as being very much a middle of the road sort of chap as another colleague was surprised when he discovered that I'd bought a brand new high performance Honda Civic and drove it into the office car park wearing my wrap-around sunglasses looking pretty cool. It was actually the car that our boss had wanted to buy but he had a car allowance from the company and it didn't stretch to it while I'd bought mine with my own money, not being entitled to a car allowance at all. Is it cool to dislike Beatles music though? I don't know or care.

    Music and literature are very similar in that they are only the communications medium, a means to an emotional and intellectual end. Whether any fiction story or song hits its mark depends as much on the recipient as its creator. The seventies was an era of widespread creativity though and its music has lasted well. However, much of the music from the past had a element of romance about it and I wonder whether modern youth regard romance in the same way or whether they are out of necessity more pragmatic about life. It is probably no coincidence that Honda marketing revolves around the idea of the power of dreams and that I still drive a high performance Honda. I also laugh at the idea that disco went out of fashion; there are a lot of people around who haven't got that message yet, including me. Don't try to be fashionable; live your dream before it's too late ... and when that angel comes along don't stop to think too long; they're not like buses.
    Last edited by JustRob; September 29th, 2019 at 09:57 PM.
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  7. #17

  8. #18
    Offline: Depressed Trollheart's Avatar
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    How about TV? In Ireland we had some great shows, such as Dr Who, Black Beauty and Children of the Stones (something that scares me even today!) as well as great American shows like Star Trek, The Six Million Dollar Man, The Bionic Woman, The Man from Atlantis, Gemini Man, Sesame Street, Alias Smith and Jones and much more. What do you remember watching, if it wasn't from your cradle, in the seventies?
    Come away, human child to the waters and the wild
    With a faery hand in hand.
    For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand. - WB Yeats "The Stolen Child"

    I drink to forget, but I never forget to drink.

    "If the real Jesus Christ were to stand up today
    He'd be gunned down cold by the CIA" - The The, "Armageddon Days Are Here (Again)" - Mind Bomb, 1989


    The most destructive force on the planet is not nukes or global warming...it is the human ego. - Ralph Rotten

  9. #19
    Hmm, all things 70s. Let's see...

    My all time favourite film "The Godfather" was released in 1972 and it's brilliant squeal in 1974.

    Some other notable, groundbreaking films: "The Alien", (1979) Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope, (1977) Monty Python's Life of Brian, (1979 - actually most of Monty Python's great stuff was from the 70s) Blazing Saddles, (1974) A Clockwork Orange (1971)

    Music, well I don't want to write pages to credit everything and everyone, but these are some of the best of the best the decade has produced in my opinion; Black Sabbath, (self titled) Judas Priest "Sad wings of destiny", Van Halen, (Self titled) Motörhead "Overkill", AC/DC "Highway to hell", Pink Floyd "Dark side of the moon", Led Zeppelin IV....

    Tolkien's brilliant "The Silmarillion" that I've just finished reading was published in 1977. Though as far as the books go, the 60s I think was a better year for publishing with gems such as; Philip K Dick's "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?" and Frank Herbert's "Dune" being published in 1968 and 1965 respectively. Those books were so ahead of their time!
    I threw a glance at humankind and saw them treacherous and feeble.
    Severe judges, cruel, unkind and fools who are always close to evil.
    Before their frightful, anxious mob, indifferent hate forever rages.
    Not learnt the lessons from the ages!
    What use are wise and tempered words?
    "Sometime, in my sweet blindness" - Pushkin

  10. #20
    I remember the TV movies: Brian's Song, Sybil, The Boy in the Plastic Bubble and Trilogy of Terror, in which Karen Black is chased around her apartment by a six inch voodoo doll. Then there was, Don't Be Afraid of the Dark, where Kim Darby is tormented by murderous gnome-like men who live in the walls of her house. Normal-sized women menaced by tiny little men. Not sure what that means.

    My favorite was Bad Ronald, the unsavory story of a boy whose mother hides him in a secret room after he accidentally murders a neighborhood girl. The mother dies and the house is resold to a couple with two pretty young daughters. That's all I'm gonna say. It's actually out of DVD. I have my copy.

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