Film Soundtracks, Scores and Musicals


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  1. #1
    Offline: Depressed Trollheart's Avatar
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    Film Soundtracks, Scores and Musicals

    Share your favourite soundtrack music here, talk about your favourite composers or witter on endlessly about Andrew Lloyd-Webber's latest smash, or whatever from the stage or screen tickles your fancy. Current or classic: let's get talking about it.

    I hadn't intended to do reviews as such here, but it just so happens that in the course of posting my last review in my own thread I came across this, and since I was going to talk about it anyway, I thought, well why not?

    Look, you don't have to do reviews. I don't have to do reviews. Hey, I can stop any time I want to! Honest! I - yeah, I know I have a problem. I need to get help. But who has money for therapists? Maybe if I just cut it down, huh? Ten a day? FIVE a day? Ah come on! I can't go cold turkey just like that! You wanna kill me? Don't answer that...

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    Little Shop of Horrors OST --- Cast recording --- 1986 (Geffen)

    Movie soundtracks are not something I review very often, but this one is pretty special. Not only is the film itself great, clever, funny and entertaining, the music forms a perfect backdrop to it, and every time I hear it I can see the movie running in my mind's eye. Possibly all the more surprising as it stars two people I really do not rate, they being Rick Moranis and Steve Martin (although the latter has something of a supporting role). Moranis annoys me because he always seems to play the stereotypical geek-become-hero figure, which for me reached an unacceptable peak with the Ghostbusters movies, and Martin I used to like but lost faith in him after he made Roxanne: for me, it's been a steady slide downwards for him from there, as far as my appreciation of him goes. Don't anyone even mention Sergeant Bilko!

    But the movie is great, a remake of course of Roger Corman's 1960 B-movie, which was made into an off-Broadway musical and from thence to a movie. For any who hasn't seen it, the basic plot runs thus: Seymour Krelborn (Moranis) works in a flower shop as a dogsbody and unappreciated genius with plants, admiring from afar the beautiful but dizzy blonde who works in the shop with him, Audrey Fulquard, played by Ellen Greene. One day he brings in a “weird plant” he has bought, and when his boss sees it he decides to put it in the window, to attract interest, which it does. After a while, the shop, which had been struggling, is making lots of money and Seymour becomes famous as the owner of the plant, named Audrey II, in honour of his unattainable love.

    However, things soon take a turn for the worse, when Seymour scratches himself on one of the plant's thorns and the Audrey II SPEAKS to him, demanding blood. Turns out it's an alien lifeform, and needs human blood and flesh to live. Cue black humour as Seymour first feeds Audrey's abusive boyfriend, dentist Dr. Orin Scrivello (Martin) to the plant, but this is not enough and once Audrey II has a taste of blood it wants more, leading to a comical trail of corpses making their way to the evil plant.

    Along the way, Audrey (the girl) and Seymour declare their love for each other, and then Seymour has to take down the alien plant in a final showdown...

    The plot isn't that important, but it does help to know it as the musical numbers basically narrate and advance the script. But it's the music that makes the movie, and this being a music forum, that's what we'll be concentrating on in this review. The above was just to give you a grounding in the film, so that what follows will make some kind of twisted sense.

    It opens, as most musicals do, with an overture, or prologue, with narration to introduce the plot, behind dramatic music which suddenly breaks into bright, rock-and-roll piano to introduce the theme, sung by three girls who act as a kind of ongoing narrative device as the movie goes along. They're known as Chiffon, Ronette and Crystal, but I'll just refer to them as the Trio for handiness' sake. They only feature a little in the movie anyhow. What is essentially the title track is a rock/soul romp, very fifties in nature, with lots of piano and brass, but it's not one of the better tracks on the album.

    It fades into one that is, that being “Skid Row (Downtown)”, a gospel-like opening that catalogues the horrors of living “downtown”, in the lowest of the low neighbourhoods, known colloquially as “Skid Row”. The song introduces the two main characters, Audrey and Seymour, the latter of whom bemoans his fate as he sings ”Poor, all my life/ I've always been poor/ I keep asking God what I'm for/ And he tells me gee, I'm not sure/ Sweep that floor kid!” It's a real soul track, building in intensity as the characters (mainly Seymour and Audrey) declare their determination to get out of this place. It goes totally Hollywood, ending on a big finish. In the movie, it's really clever as after the big finish someone throws slop out on the sidewalk and a tramp shuffles past, somewhat ruining the atmosphere.

    The arrival of the alien plant is introduced in “Da Doo”, with Moranis as Seymour detailing how he came to buy the Audrey II from an old flower shop run by “a Chinese guy”, as the Trio rip off a perfectly-balanced ”To-tal-e-clipse-ofthe-sun!” Ah, you have to hear it. It's very fifties again, like most of the music: lots of piano, doo-wop singing, close harmonies and the like. So with his plant bought, Seymour then begins to think he's been sold a lemon, as the plant refuses to grow, no matter what he does. In the next song, “Grow for Me”, a parody of an old fifties love song, Moranis begs the plant to grow, detailing all he's done to try make it grow, and at the end snaps ”Whaddya want from me? Blood?” Of course this is the spark, and when he discovers this is what's needed, he squeezes out a few drops, eyes closed, but this will never be enough. Still, the plant does begin to grow when he leaves in frustration, as the dramatic finale to the song denotes.


    Another standout then in the lovely “Somewhere That's Green”, as Ellen Greene Yeah) in the role of Audrey sits and sings of her dream life, married to Seymour with kids in a house with a white picket fence. A beautiful fragile piano melody carries the song, about halfway getting more forceful and desperate as the strings come in, then fade away as Audrey realises this is just ”A picture out of / Better Homes and Gardens Magazine, and the piano slowly leads the song to its sad conclusion. Greene's dizzy-blonde voice is a little hard to put up with, but she does have a lovely singing voice, and it's a really nice song.

    “Some Fun Now” reintroduces the Trio, but I could live without it. It's a sort of caribbean styled/limbo song that really goes nowhere as far as I can see. But then we get “Dentist”, which introduces the mad character played by Steve Martin, Orin Scrivello, a dentist who gets off on pain. Not his, other people's. He's in the right business then, as he gleefully sings that his mother told him when he was a child ”You'll be a dentist/ You have a talent for causing pain/ You'll be a dentist/ People will pay you to be inhumane.” It's a kind of a play on the old “Leader of the Pack” song, with lots of echoey drum and guitar, and to be fair, Martin makes the song with his insane persona of the sadistic dentist.



    Then it's time to hear Audrey II sing, and her voice (his voice: the plant is male, despite Seymour's having given it a female name) is provided by Four Tops legend Levi Stubbs. “Feed Me” is a real rock/soul tour-de-force, as the plant promises to give his owner anything he wants if he will feed him some human flesh. Seymour comes in on the song, unsure: ”I don't know/ I have so many strong reservations/ Should I go and perform mutilations?” and the rock vibe goes up and the two join as Seymour realises that Audrey's dentist boyfriend could be a victim: ”The guy sure looks like/ Plant food to me!”

    And so the stage is set, and the plant has the first of many victims. With the abusive dentist gone from her life, Audrey is free to fall in love with Seymour, and they duet on the lovesong “Suddenly Seymour”, with nice piano and strings which, like “Somewhere That's Green”, starts off quietly and gentle but gets more operatic and powerful as it heads towards its, ahem, climax. On this song Greene really shows off her singing prowess, and to be fair, Moranis can carry a tune, but the girl is without question the star of this song. Reminds me of Sam Brown at her best.

    That's the end of the lovey-dovey stuff though, as “Suppertime” brings back in Levi Stubbs and encourages Seymour to kill his boss, who has discovered what he's been doing back late at the shop. A great funky number, it also features the Trio, who function in this song as a backing group for the Audrey II,

    Seymour's life starts to spiral out of control as his fame rises, as “The Meek Shall Inherit” tells us, with the Trio and Seymour singing as Moranis tries to make up his mind whether he should allow Audrey II to live, or finish it off and so kiss goodbye to his new fame and riches. Almost a tango in style, it slows down near the end as gentle strings and piano sway his mind back as Seymour reasons that without the Audrey II and the fame it brings his own Audrey might not love him, and the song ends on a somewhat confused crescendo.

    Stubbs' piece-de-resistance then is “Mean Green Mother from Outer Space”, where he rocks and funks it out like there's no tomorrow, laughing in Seymour's face: ”I'm just a mean green mother/ From outer space/ And I'm bad!/ Just a mean green mother/ From outer space/ And it looks like/ You been had!” The climax both of the film and of the soundtrack, it rocks along and gets really frenetic near the end as the plant is destroyed - great guitars and brass, excellent percussion and rollicking piano all mesh to make a fine almost-closer, but the last word is reserved for “Finale (Don't Feed the Plants)”, a rocker with great backing vocals, kind of a reprise of the opening theme which brings the curtain down really well.

    Like most soundtracks, it helps if you've seen the movie, but even if you haven't, you can still enjoy this album on its own merits. There's some great music on it, some fine vocal performances, and hey! Levi Stubbs! I mean, come on: what are you waiting for?

    TRACK LISTING

    1. Prologue (Little Shop of Horrors)
    2. Skid Row (Downtown)
    3. Da-doo
    4. Grow for Me
    5. Somewhere That's Green
    6. Some Fun Now
    7. Dentist
    8. Feed Me
    9. Suddenly Seymour
    10. Suppertime
    11. The Meek Shall Inherit
    12. Mean Green Mother from Outer Space
    13. Finale (Don't Feed the Plants)
    Come away, human child to the waters and the wild
    With a faery hand in hand.
    For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand. - WB Yeats "The Stolen Child"

    I drink to forget, but I never forget to drink.

    "If the real Jesus Christ were to stand up today
    He'd be gunned down cold by the CIA" - The The, "Armageddon Days Are Here (Again)" - Mind Bomb, 1989


    The most destructive force on the planet is not nukes or global warming...it is the human ego. - Ralph Rotten

  2. #2
    Curse you, Red Baron (no, not that Red Baron- inside joke). Now I have to review my own soundtrack in my thread. West Side Story which was scored by Leonard Bernstein in 1957. I'll probably review the 1961 version since that's the one I listened to though. See if you can review that one.
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    And check out Gertie's blog on her favorite top twenty-five albums between 1955-2017 Hidden Content

  3. #3
    Offline: Depressed Trollheart's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrmustard615 View Post
    Curse you, Red Baron (no, not that Red Baron- inside joke). Now I have to review my own soundtrack in my thread. West Side Story which was scored by Leonard Bernstein in 1957. I'll probably review the 1961 version since that's the one I listened to though. See if you can review that one.
    Hmm. WSS doesn't particularly interest me. I tend only to review albums I have an interest in. You should see my review for Jesus Christ Superstar! Ha - you probably will, at some point.
    Come away, human child to the waters and the wild
    With a faery hand in hand.
    For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand. - WB Yeats "The Stolen Child"

    I drink to forget, but I never forget to drink.

    "If the real Jesus Christ were to stand up today
    He'd be gunned down cold by the CIA" - The The, "Armageddon Days Are Here (Again)" - Mind Bomb, 1989


    The most destructive force on the planet is not nukes or global warming...it is the human ego. - Ralph Rotten

  4. #4
    Lady in the Water composed by James Newton Howard


  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Trollheart View Post
    Hmm. WSS doesn't particularly interest me. I tend only to review albums I have an interest in. You should see my review for Jesus Christ Superstar! Ha - you probably will, at some point.

    I like that one actually. Will look forward to that review.
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    And check out Gertie's blog on her favorite top twenty-five albums between 1955-2017 Hidden Content

  6. #6
    Offline: Depressed Trollheart's Avatar
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    Just one more, honest. I’m serious. After this I’m taking a break from reviewing… well, maybe or more after this, Or two. Somebody help me!!!!

    I considered long and hard before deciding to review this originally. After all, on the surface (and there’s really nothing much below the surface, let’s be honest) it’s a pretty braindead, flag-waving, testosterone-filled gung-ho movie, almost a recruitment video for the US Navy masquerading as an action movie. Remember Yvan eht nioj from The Simpsons? No? Then sod ya! But damn it, it is just such a perfect example of a really basic and vacuous movie that has such a bitchin' soundtrack that I felt I had to go with it. Not only that, it made the career of one actor and brought another to our attention, reintroduced us to some old rock favourites and gave one of the acts here a number one worldwide smash. To say nothing of the amount of wide-eyed teenagers who suddenly discovered they wanted to be fighter pilots! Yeah, we're talking about the one and only

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    Oddly enough, for what I now consider to be a pretty poor movie, it seems to be very highly regarded, and indeed when I went to see it at what would have been the tender age of 23, I loved it. What young guy wouldn't? Power, speed, weapons, hot girls, shooting down the bad guys, motorbikes, sex ... this had it all. But when I look back at it now - and I seem to be in the minority here, though you can tell me if you feel the same - it really was nothing more than a massive unapologetic propaganda stunt for US military force and the policies of what would have been the Reagan administration at the time.

    I'm sure I don't need to go into the details - not that there are many - as no doubt everyone's seen or knows of the movie, but basically Tom Cruise joins the US Navy's Fighter Weapons School, known as Top Gun, learning to become an even better pilot than he is. He grapples with the legacy of his father's death and comes to terms blah blah blah. If you really want a full synopsis here it is Top Gun - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia but what I'm concerned with here as ever is the music. You can argue over whether the film is a classic or a borefest, or indeed a thinly-disguised recruitment tool for the Navy, but in the end I don't care. The fact is, the music kicks bottom and that's what I'm going to discuss here.

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    Top Gun OST --- Various Artists --- 1986 (Columbia)

    As you would probably expect, it's full of high-powered, rip-roaring rock, an octane-fuelled journey that takes you through some true stars of past and present. Some are household names, some are almost unknown, but virtually every song on this album - or every piece of music - is close to flawless. Well, maybe that's a bit strong. But there are no bad tracks. Check your six, Goose and plot a course: we're heading in!

    There are, apparently, three versions of this album, the first (the one I know and own) released at the time of the movie, 1986, with a reissue in 1999 adding five more tracks and another release in 2006 which put yet another five on, making the final total twenty tracks, big for any soundtrack of the day. As most of the added tracks are pretty good anyway, I'll include them in yet another departure from my practice of not including bonus tracks. They're not really bonus material anyway: they're all on different issues.

    So the original then - and both other versions, as all extra tracks were added to the end - begins with the powerful and bouncy “Danger Zone”, performed by Kenny Loggins. Before I go into the track details, I've found out some interesting stuff from my friends over Wiki way. Seems Loggins was actually not the first choice to sing this. In fact, the label approached both Toto and REO Speedwagon to perform the song, which was written by Giorgio Moroder and Tom Whitlock. Both bands declined; Toto became a victim of lawyergate, as the two sets of attorneys fought it out, Toto's lot eventually declining to allow the band perform the song, while REO wanted to use some of their own songs on the soundtrack but were told to go away, so they did. Loggins was then signed up. He apparently had no problems singing the song, which was good news for him as it brought him back into the spotlight after Footloose (come on, be honest: who remembers him for anything other than that? Even now?) and gave him a smash hit in the USA, taking the single to number two, although it never even scraped into the top forty over here. But then, America's where it's at, yeah? And this was an American film, with American actors about an American military service (if for some reason you weren't aware of that take a gander at the stars-and-stripes proudly displayed on both the film poster and the soundtrack album cover) so who cared about some Europeans never buying the single? Loggins had hit gold, and he was back. For a while.

    Others who were approached and declined to participate include Bryan Adams, who disliked the idea of glamourising war which the film does so well, and Toto, who were to use their song "Only You" in place of Berlin's smash, but were turned down when the lawyers got involved. It's a pity really, as it's an excellent song, and would probably have been as big a hit as "Take My Breath Away". Judas Priest also refused to contribute their song "Reckless", but for a different reason: they believed the movie would bomb. Oh, Rob! Did you ever get it wrong!

    The song itself, weirdly, starts out almost as does his other big hit, and I wonder if ... let me just check here ...no, Moroder was not involved in that song. Oh well. Anyway after a second or two you realise you are definitely not listening to “Footloose II” as the guitars break in and the power amps right up. To be honest, I'm not sure Loggins's voice suits this: it sounds a little too high-pitched and a little weak, but he soon grows into it and the song really is carried on the guitar work of Dan Huff, who plays a blinder, and the thumping percussion that drives it along like a marauding F-14 Tomcat. It's the perfect opener: powerful, fast, full of energy and arrogance and promising great things, which is not a promise broken. Musically, at any rate.

    Point of no interest to anyone else: I used to think the line was “I went to the danger zone”, when it is in fact “Highway to the danger zone”. Highway? What F-14 you know that uses a highway? Anyway, on we go. The tone has been established, we've had a great opener so it had better stay high quality.

    Well, if I say the words Cheap Trick, you know the answer to that. A hard, punching rock song with the Cheap Trick flair for style, oddly enough not written by them but in fact penned by Harold Faltermeyer, who later contributes the theme, and was known to us prior to this for the hit “Axel F” from the movie Beverly Hills Cop, and Mark Spiro, who has worked with Laura Branigan, Heart, John Waite and Bad English, among others. Great sense of AOR in this song, some great keyboard work and a perfect vocal, with biting guitars like sidewinder missiles and a driving pounding rhythm. Kenny Loggins is back again then for “Playing with the Boys”, a more dancy, rootsy sort of song with sort of whistling synth over it a la The Cars on “Heartbeat City”. Not one of my favourites, with its hard, echoing drumbeat and a sense of “”Flashdance” somehow. The chorus warps into decent AOR, but it's still a little low on my list of good tracks on this album.



    It's time to welcome the ladies to the party then, as a trio of songs sung by females kicks off with Teena Marie, who sings “Lead Me On”, with an almost Alan Parsons Project opening that then turns into salsa with congas and marimbas, reminds me of Cher at times. A fast song again, with a great horn section giving it all they've got, but not really my thing. Have to be a little tolerant though, as Marie died in 2010, aged only fifty-four. I can hear strains of another late female singer here too, Laura Branigan. The quality though, which has, to be fair, dipped slightly since “Playing with the Boys”, screams right back up to ten with a barrel roll and a swooping dive as the worldwide smash “Take My Breath Away” does exactly that worldwide, slowing everything down with the love theme. If you don't know the song I don't know what to tell you: it was number one everywhere and the iconic video for it, showing singer Terri Nunn standing on the wing of a fighter jet is emblazoned into the public consciousness by now. Although not written by them (it was Moroder/Whitlock again) the song became Berlin's biggest ever hit and helped fuel sales of their album Count Three and Pray. People buying it, myself included, were probably nonplussed to find that this is not the sort of music Berlin usually play: they are more a sort of rock/punk thing, though very good. Nevertheless, on the strength of this single an album which would have been totally overlooked made a decent showing in the charts and no doubt gained them some new fans.

    Gloria's up next, flyin' the flag for Cuban women as she rattles through “Hot Summer Nights” with Miami Sound Machine. Yeah, they say that, but let's face it: MSM were really nothing more than a backing band for Gloria Estefan, and when she went solo she did far better than she ever had with them. Nobody asked what happened to the 'Machine: nobody cared. Pretty good really, considering I'm not a big MSM fan, and there is a reasonably rocking beat to it. Kind of Pat Benatar meets Madonna and a catfight ensues. Typical of those eighties soundtrack songs, which of course this is. Good for what it is and better, in my opinion, than her more salsa stuff. Melody's very familiar; wish I could place it. Oh well.

    Another sugary ballad now, far inferior to “Take My Breath Away”, it features that annoying ubiquitous digital piano that most eighties power ballads did, and “Heaven in Your Eyes” by Loverboy is decent but very derivative. Pretty much any AOR band around this period could have sung this, and it's written by a Vancouver-based songwriting team, Mae Moore and John Dexter. One of several artists who performed, or could have performed on the album, Loverboy had to dispense with the services of keyboardist Doug Johnson, another who felt the message in the film was too gung-ho and glamourised war, which of course it did. Good song though, if nothing terribly special. Time to ramp the power back up then: enough of these ballads and wimp rock! Larry Greene (who he?) gets us back on track with “Through the Fire”, which to be fair is pretty much a rewriting of “Danger Zone”, with some nice stabbing keyboard chords, though I have to say Greene does a better job on the vocals than did our Kenny on the opener. Bitchin' guitar solo too.

    Back to the ladies then as we move towards the end of the (original) album with Marietta, who gives us “Destination unknown”, a decent rocker with nice piano and keys, and a very good vocal indeed. Kind of reminds me of a younger Tina Turner. The closer then is the only instrumental on the album, which is quite a feat for a film soundtrack, and it's Harold Faltermeyer, who wrote Cheap Trick's contribution to the album, with the “Top Gun Anthem”. Ably assisted by guitar legend Steve Stevens, it's a powerful but obviously nationalistic tune that utilises a sort of progressive rock feel in the guitar, reminds me a lot of seventies Genesis. Digital piano then joins as the thing powers up and you can just see the F-14s flying off into the Arabian sunset as they leave their carrier and climb up above the gulf, crossing the setting sun as they head for an intercept. Fair stirs the blood, or makes you want to puke, depending on your disposition towards the US Navy really.

    TRACK LISTING

    1. Danger Zone (Kenny Loggins)
    2. Mighty Wings (Cheap Trick)
    3. Playing with the Boys (Kenny Loggins)
    4. Lead Me On (Teena Marie)
    5. Take My Breath Away (Berlin)
    6. Hot Summer Nights (Miami Sound Machine)
    7. Heaven in Your Eyes (Loverboy)
    8. Through the Fire (Larry Greene)
    9. Destination Unknown (Marietta)
    10. Top Gun Anthem (Harold Faltermeyer)

    And that's it for the original version. The next one was, as mentioned, released thirteen years later in 1999, and contained five extra tracks, although one was a twelve-inch version of one of the tracks already here, so doesn't really count. While I have nothing at all against any of the tracks, it seems like a pointless squeeze-more-money-out-of-the-fans exercise, as the tracks here are all classics and available on loads of other albums. Otis Redding's superb “(Sittin' on the) Dock of the Bay” kicks it off, perhaps one of the best “lazy” songs ever, a song you just have to lie back and relax to. It's followed by the only original piece, an instrumental typically, by again Harold Faltermeyer, and while I would certainly not say this is worth the price of the album on its own, it is worth getting. A lovely, acoustic guitar backed by doleful synth creates a melancholic, reflective mood that none of the songs - even “Take My Breath Away” - managed on the original album. Quite stunning in its simplicity and just perfect really. Other than that, you have, for some reason (can't remember if it's in the movie, maybe it is) Jerry Lee Lewis's rock'n'roll classic “Great Balls of Fire” followed by The Righteous Brothers' “You've Lost that Lovin' Feeling”,which I know was in the movie, and finishing up, for some unknown reason, with a twelve-inch extended remix of “Playing with the Boys”, which I'm not going to subject myself to.

    However, thin excuse for siphoning cash out of naive music and film fans though this reissue was, the 2006 “Special Deluxe Edition” went one step further, grabbing just about any popular power ballad or AOR hit and justifying its inclusion by slapping the legend “Music from or inspired by” on the album sleeve. I'll admit, there's a wafer-thin relation in each song back to the movie, but songs like “Can't Fight This Feeling” by REO, “Broken Wings” by Mister Mister and “The Final Countdown” by Europe just seem like they're there to make up the numbers and give the producers a reason to reissue the album in the hope of conning those who had already both versions that this one was something they should have in their collection. No extra tracks that weren't available almost everywhere else, no instrumentals, not even an extended remix. Pure and utter profit-hungry greed. Top Gun? More like Top Dollar!

    For the record (hah!) they also crowbarred “Nothing's Gonna Stop Us Now” by Starship and “The Power of Love” by Jenny Rush onto this monstrosity. What any of them have to do directly with the movie is anyone's guess, but if you're going to include them, why not Scorpions' “Rock You Like a Hurricane”? Wings' “Jet”? fuck it: why not Village People's “In the Navy”? Okay, that's going a bit far, but so is this stretching of the franchise to breaking point. I hope nobody was stupid enough to buy this. I'm sure there were many who did.

    But taken as an original recording, the Top Gun soundtrack still stands for me as an example of what can be achieved when the record is not crammed with dodgy instrumentals, remixes and soppy love songs. This has just the right balance of all three, and places them pretty much where they should be on the album, which makes it far better and far more effective than perhaps you might have expected it to be. The movie may have sucked balls, but the soundtrack kicks behind!

    I still ain't joining the navy though...
    Come away, human child to the waters and the wild
    With a faery hand in hand.
    For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand. - WB Yeats "The Stolen Child"

    I drink to forget, but I never forget to drink.

    "If the real Jesus Christ were to stand up today
    He'd be gunned down cold by the CIA" - The The, "Armageddon Days Are Here (Again)" - Mind Bomb, 1989


    The most destructive force on the planet is not nukes or global warming...it is the human ego. - Ralph Rotten

  7. #7
    Tom Cruise has ruined every single movie he's ever been in. The only way he's any good, is when he's paired with a top tier actor. Gene Hackman, Dustin Hoffman, etc. He even takes credit for making the Navy's Top Gun what it is. /smh... IMO, he's a disgusting little midget who is in a position to actually take down the Orwellian cult that he shills for, but instead, he'd rather spend his spare time puckering up to kiss David Miscaviage's butt. I also think Kenny Loggins really sucks, and I've always thought so.

    By far, best composers and/or soundtracks: (IMO)

    Michael Nyman: "The Piano."
    Ennio Morricone: Tons of spaghetti westerns, including, "Shootout At The OK Corral," and others like, "The Legend of 1900," "Cinema Paradiso," and on and on. Amazing soundtracks. All of them.
    Andrew Lloyd Webber: "Cats," "Phantom of the Opera," "I Don't Know How To Love Him," from, "Jesus Christ Superstar," etc.
    Danny Elfman has done a ton of soundtracks, and his work is always interesting. Too many to list. "Batman," "Beetlejuice," and "Edward Scissorhands," are the standouts.

  8. #8
    South Pacific twas always a fav of mine. I actually did that one in theatre. We were held over 6 weeks by popular demand. I played one of Emil Debek's Polynesian children. Di te moi, baby!


    Actually I like many of the musicals composed by Rogers & Hammerstein. They were a helluva team.
    I auditioned for Sound of music once, but I definitely do not look Austrian so I got a pass.

    Singing in the Rain: When Cyd Charisse is wearing the green dress, it is considered shutthefuckup time at my house. Mmmmm Cyd.


    Jesus Christ Superstar: I prefer the movie over the stage version. But a few years ago I got to see Ted Neely reprise his role on stage. Twas a good show, but he didn't have the voice he did in his youth.


    Man of La Mancha. Love it, and light-opera is as close to opera as I ever wanna get. To me, opera is a waste of perfectly good classical music. The Broadway soundtrack with Richard Kiley was awesome. The movie not so much.

    Platoon: Had a great soundtrack. You'd have to be a commie to not like that music. Actually, even the Ruskies liked that soundtrack.

    Chicago: What a fun musical. I especially love the part: "He ran into my knife...he ran into my knife ten times!"

    Cabaret: The movie version is actually better than the stage version because Liza convinced the director to let her add a song or 2, and they turned out to be smash-hits. Joel Gray was super-extra creepy as the MC as well.

    Burlesque: I'd ogled Christina Aguilera for many a year before I saw this movie, and she can sing as good as she looked. Wow, some great pipes that lady has. Cher was okay...

    Dreamgirls: The day after I saw this movie I bought the soundtrack. Hudson was so good, that for the first half of the movie I completely forgot that Beyonce was even in the movie. If you love Motown jams, then this is a movie for you.

  9. #9

  10. #10
    Ralph, I agree with ALL of these. Fantastic.

    Also, Any list like this would be remiss to not mention "Les Miserables." Absolutely brilliant.

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