MUSTY'S TOP 100 MUSICAL ARTISTS- EVER! - Page 6


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Thread: MUSTY'S TOP 100 MUSICAL ARTISTS- EVER!

  1. #51

    72. ELTON JOHN





    Major Era: 1969-present

    Main Labels: Uni, MCA, Rocket


    Best Albums: Honky Chateau, Goodbye Yellow Brick Road, Elton John

    Best Songs: Goodbye Yellow Brick Road, Mona Lisa and Mad Hatters, Funeral For a Friend, Take Me To the Pilot

    Reginald Dwight, better known as Elton John, began his career working at the EMI offices in London. After a stint in Bluesology, Elton embarked on a solo career as a singer songwriter with some modest success. He became something of a phenomenon after the release of Crocodile Rock in late 1972 and was the most popular act in the world through much of the seventies. His flamboyant persona fit in well with the glam rock tendencies of the seventies. Later as his fame settled down a bit, he began making hits more in the MOR vein but remained very popular along the way. He sang the eulogy for Princess Dianaís funeral and was knighted by the Queen. Today, he is perhaps best known for his commitment to gay rights causes and he remains one of the most successful artists in rock history.

    Why Do I Like This Artist? Well, for starters, he and Bernie Taupin could write some great songs. I especially like the singer songwriter Elton with his self titled album and Tumbleweed Connection in particular but also Honky Chateau. The superstar years are a little more mixed. I really donít like Donít Shoot Me Iím Only the Piano Player and other albums of the period are a bit mixed, I do like Goodbye Yellow Brick Road which I have to rate as my favorite song of 1973. In some ways I compare Elton John to David Bowie which is a bit unfair to the latter. They were both glam musicians in their own ways though I suspect Elton was a bit more commercial. Nevertheless, the songs of Elton John stand up rather well, especially his seventies material.

    Links to songs:

    Your Song
    Rocket Man
    Crocodile Rock
    Goodbye Yellow Brick Road
    Someone Saved My Life Tonight



    Elton John page

    https://www.eltonjohn.com/elton-john
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  2. #52

    71. THE THIRTEENTH FLOOR ELEVATORS




    Major Era: 1966-1969

    Main Labels: International Artists


    Best Albums: The Psychedelic Sounds of the Thirteenth Floor Elevators, Easter Everywhere

    Best Songs: Youíre Gonna Miss Me, She Lives (In a Time of Her Own), Slip Inside This House

    From the demented depths of Dallas, Texas came the garage punk band, the Thirteenth Floor Elevators. Led by Roky Erickson, they were known for their wild psychedelic tendencies. Indeed, they may have been one of the first truly psychedelic bands, scoring a minor hit with Youíre Gonna Miss Me in 1966. They also introduced of all things, the electric jug, which is prominent on Youíre Gonna Miss Me. Outside of the one song, fame and success eluded the group and they would split around 1969. A few years later, they were rediscovered when Lenny Kaye released the Nuggets compilation and they have had a small but loyal following since. Roky Erickson embarked on a solo career in the seventies and, while not especially successful, had gained cult status with his frenzied songs. Sadly, we lost Roky recently but the music lives on.


    Why Do I Like This Artist? The Elevators are probably my favorite band of the garage rock genre. In fact, they are pretty indicative of the Texas underground sound at the time as you can hear hints of what would be known as cow punk later. Tommy Hall (electric jug) and Stacy Sutherland (lead guitar) were also prominent members of the band. They were one of the more heavier bands of the mid sixties and one of the most outrageous. One senses they were of the wrong decade as flamboyance was more frowned upon in the sixties. One thing for certain is that they deserved better than one minor hit.

    Links to songs:

    Youíre Gonna Miss Me
    Fire Engine
    She Lives (In a Time of Her Own)
    May the Circle Remain Unbroken
    If You Have Ghosts (Roky Erickson)

    Thirteenth Floor Elevators Page

    https://ultimateclassicrock.com/13th...ators-history/
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  3. #53

    70. CONOR OBERST/BRIGHT EYES




    Major Era: 1999-present

    Main Labels: Saddle Creek, Merge


    Best Albums: Conor Oberst, The Outer South, Iím Wide Awake Itís Morning

    Best Songs: To All the Lights in the Windows, When the President Talks To God, , First Day of My Life, Lover I Donít Have To Love, Tachycardia

    One of the better known artists of the indie rock genre, Conor Oberst, first with Bright Eyes, then on his own and with other projects, emerged as one of the brighter lights of the modern folk movement. Oberst is especially popular on modern rock stations and in colleges with his pointed songs such as When the President Talks To God (from the Bush era). There is a certain honesty in his songs. Bright Eyes has had some limited commercial success on the charts and Oberst has gotten quite a bit of airplay on college oriented radio. Bright Eyes last recorded in 2011 while Oberst has been involved in various projects including the Mystic Valley Band and the Monsters of Folk.

    Why Do I Like This Artist? More folk than rock, Conor Oberst has emerged as one of the best songwriters of his era. I have to agree with that as his songs often speak of social consciousness as well as his own personal experiences. I am a big fan of folk music and he is one of those that I consider part of that genre. Like other folk artists, he does occasionally use electric instruments but you always know youíre listening to folk music with him. He isnít the best vocalist in the world and I think that actually adds to his straightforwardly honest style. In other words, there doesnít seem to be any airs about him. This makes him, and Bright Eyes, one of my favorite artists of the millennium.

    Links to songs:

    Bowl of Oranges
    First Day of My Life
    Four Winds
    To All the Lights in the Windows
    Tachycardia





    Conor Oberst page


    https://www.conoroberst.com/
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  4. #54

    69. THE SEX PISTOLS




    Major Era: 1976-1978

    Main Labels: EMI, A&M


    Best Albums: Never Mind the Bollocks, Here Are the Sex Pistols

    Best Songs: Pretty Vacant, Anarchy in the UK, God Save the Queen

    Punkís own bad boys to put it lightly, Johnny Rotten and company burst onto the British punk scene in 1976. To say they were anti-establishment is something of an understatement. They signed a contract with EMI who soon sacked them for their lewd behavior, especially after an infamous appearance with Bill Grundy. They signed on with A&M records and released their landmark album Never Mind the Bollocks in 1977. After a disastrous tour of the US in 1978, the Sex Pistols, who never really got along anyway, broke up. John Lydon (Rotten) would form Public Image Ltd and continue to thumb his nose even at nice people while Sid Viscous became something of an infamous celebrity himself. He was accused of murdering his girlfriend, Nancy Spungeon, in New York and would die of a heroin overdose soon after. Even though the Sex Pistols only released one bonafide album, their impact on the punk movement is immeasurable and that puts them on my list.


    Why Do I Like This Artist? Well, letís face it. These guys exhume punk more than anyone else in history, donít they? Yes, they only have one album but their three most prominent songs (see best songs) are about as good as anything that came out in 1977. Yes, they can be a bit crude at times, okay, so theyíre a bit crude all the time, but musically, theyíre a hard driving band that portrays the spirit of punk better than any other band I know. Just donít get too close to them or theyíll spit on you though.

    Links to songs:

    Anarchy in the UK
    God Save the Queen
    Pretty Vacant
    Holidays in the Sun


    Sex Pistols page

    https://www.sexpistolsofficial.com/
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  5. #55

    68. VIOLENT FEMMES




    Major Era: 1983-1994

    Main Labels: Slash, Warner Bros., Reprise


    Best Albums: Violent Femmes, The Blind Leading the Naked, Why Do Birds Sing?

    Best Songs: Gone Daddy Gone, American Music, Candlelight Song, American Music

    From the deep jungles of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Violent Femmes was a minimalist trio who had some success in the alternative music genre in the 1980s. Discovered by James Honeyman-Scott of the Pretenders, they signed with Slash Records and found success with their debut album with songs like Gone Daddy Gone and Blister in the Sun. Their signature sound featured a sardonic Gordon Gano on vocals and acoustic guitar, Brian Ritchie on a stand-up bass, and Victor Lorenzo on snare drum, plus the occasional violin for flavor. After their debut, they released a few albums with only moderate success but scored a big alternative hit with American Music in 1992. Since then, theyíve stayed busy recording and making television appearance such as a cameo on the Sabrina The Teenage Witch TV Series.

    Why Do I Like This Artist? It seems like every other band from the eighties on have been compared to the Velvet Underground. In the Femmesí case, there is some validation to the claim. Their minimalist sound measures favorably against the Velvetsí best material. Their whole first album has a DIY feeling about it. I especially love the xylophone on Gone Daddy Gone; you donít hear that much in rock. Their first album is their best but there are moments on all their albums, particularly on Why Do Birds Sing.

    Links to songs:

    Gone Daddy Gone
    Blister in the Sun
    Children of the Revolution
    Nightmares
    American Music

    Violent Femmes on Wiki

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Violent_Femmes
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  6. #56

    67. THE RAMONES




    Major Era: 1976-1996

    Main Labels: Sire, Warner Bros.


    Best Albums: Rocket To Russia, Leave Home, Ramones

    Best Songs: Blitzkrieg Bop, Sheena is a Punk Rocker, Teenage Lobotomy, Do You Remember Rock n Roll Radio

    This was the band that put punk rock on the map in the US. Sort of an anti-Sex Pistols in a sense, the Ramones were known for their two minute anthems such as Sheena is a Punk Rocker and Teenage Lobotomy. They, no doubt, were the forerunners of what would become pop punk, though I suspect they would have gotten sick at that suggestion. Like Blondie and the Talking Heads, they were major players in the New York punk scene. After four highly regarded albums in the late seventies, they settled into a pattern of power punk albums all through the eighties and into the nineties. The Ramones, sadly, would be hit with much sadness as all four original members have passed away, three from natural causes. Still, the Ramones were probably one of the most fun bands to come out of the punk movement.

    Why Do I Like This Artist? In a word, their energy. They proved that being three chord wonders can create some really good music. In one way, they sound like early Beatles circa With the Beatles but they could also get topical such as in songs like the KKK Took My Baby Away. The political bent is interesting as front man Joey Ramone was an unabashed liberal while second in command Marky, well, wasnít, being a big supporter of Reagan at the time. Still, they all made some great music together, and as mentioned, are one of the most fun bands to listen to on this list.

    Links to songs:

    Blitzkrieg Bop
    Sheena is a Punk Rocker
    Teenage Lobotomy
    Do You Remember Rock n Roll Radio
    Psycho Therapy


    Ramones on the Great Rock Bible

    http://thegreatrockbible.com/portfolio-item/ramones/
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  7. #57
    Member Irwin's Avatar
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    Regarding Elton John, the song Daniel is one of my favorite Elton John songs. I had my own interpretation of what it was about, as have a lot of people. I felt that it was about some guy who was having a tough time with life and just wanted to get away, which was actually pretty close.

    Bernie Taupin wrote it about a Vietnam vet who wanted to get back to the life he had before he went off to war but wasn't able to because of all the attention he was receiving from having been injured in battle. But why's he going to Spain? That's kind of a weird destination considering Spain was still under the rule of a brutal dictator--Francisco Franco. And it doesn't even sing that well. Elton sings Spayayeeeayeeaaayn. Why not sing about Tripoli? That would sing better... I can see the red tail lights heading for Tripoli... As a poem, maybe it made sense, but not so much as a song.

  8. #58
    Offline: Depressed Trollheart's Avatar
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    Conor Oberst: Fell in love with this guy's music as a result of my Trollheart Listens to Every Album from 2017 thread, and thence into Bright Eyes. Haven't heard anything bad from either yet.

    Nick Cave: Huge fan of the man. Have all his albums, though personally - "The Mercy Seat" excluded" - I don't rate Tender Prey, Kicking Against the Pricks, Your Funeral My Trial and The Firstborn is Dead, preferring the more recent stuff, post-The Good Son inclusive. I wasn't crazy about Dig, Lazarus, Dig though I think I only listened to it the once, and while I loved The Lyre of Orpheus I didn't really like Abbatoir Blues, which were released together. He's really knocked it out of the park though recently with Push the Sky Away and The Skeleton Tree, though I have yet to listen to Ghosteen. Yes his music is dark but there's often an undercurrent of black humour running through it, such as in "O'Malley's Bar" on Murder Ballads or "John Finn's Wife" on Henry's Dream. Definitely an acquired taste, but one worth pursuing.

    Elton John: I love the guy but to be honest it always rankled that he never writes his own lyrics. I know he writes the music, but I feel Bernie Taupin gets a bit of a raw deal. I mean, everyone knows it's him but a new Elton song comes out and it's "Listen to the new hit from Elton John" not from Bernie Taupin. Oh well, guess they're happy with it that way. However I believe that's what distinguishes Bowie from him; sure, Ronson and Visconti virtually wrote The Man Who Sold the World between them, but since then Bowie always controlled all creative aspects of his career, especially lyrics and music. Favourite for me from Elton is, oddly perhaps, "Song for Guy", which is virtually instrumental of course. I feel he can really stretch on that song and show what he can do, rather than what he and Bernie can do. I assume he was able to write the three-word lyric to that himself.

    That thing about "Daniel" is interesting, Badhouses. I always assumed it was actually his brother (real or fictional) and he was just watching him leave. I guess as regards Spain being the destination, well it always was, and still is the main holiday spot for Brits: certainly would have been in the 70s and 80s. Franco may have been a dictator, but he surely knew his country needed the income from tourism and so he didn't discourage tourists, and most people just went there in the same way they went to Sun City, oblivious to or uncaring of the political climate. Also, wasn't Libya under Gadaffi at the time, and a lot further for Brits to travel, plus less familiar? I'd have been more scared going to Tripoli than I would to Madrid or Barcelona.

    I always thought Daniel was blind. When Elton sings "Daniel, your eyes have died, but you see more than I." Maybe he meant the will to live, if this is a Vietnam vet, had gone out of his eyes? Other favourites would be of course "Candle in the Wind", then maybe "Sad Songs" and "Sorry Seems to be the Hardest Word", and I always have a soft spot for "Sacrifice" and "I'm Still Standing."
    Come away, human child to the waters and the wild
    With a faery hand in hand.
    For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand. - WB Yeats "The Stolen Child"

    I drink to forget, but I never forget to drink.

    "If the real Jesus Christ were to stand up today
    He'd be gunned down cold by the CIA" - The The, "Armageddon Days Are Here (Again)" - Mind Bomb, 1989


    The most destructive force on the planet is not nukes or global warming...it is the human ego. - Ralph Rotten

  9. #59
    Quote Originally Posted by Trollheart View Post

    That thing about "Daniel" is interesting, Badhouses. I always assumed it was actually his brother (real or fictional) and he was just watching him leave. I guess as regards Spain being the destination, well it always was, and still is the main holiday spot for Brits: certainly would have been in the 70s and 80s. Franco may have been a dictator, but he surely knew his country needed the income from tourism and so he didn't discourage tourists, and most people just went there in the same way they went to Sun City, oblivious to or uncaring of the political climate. Also, wasn't Libya under Gadaffi at the time, and a lot further for Brits to travel, plus less familiar? I'd have been more scared going to Tripoli than I would to Madrid or Barcelona.
    Also might note that some of the spaghetti westerns of the 1960s as well as How I Won the War starring John Lennon were filmed in Spain, when Franco was certainly very much in charge.
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  10. #60
    Member Irwin's Avatar
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    Tripoli was just the first name that popped into my head that would sing better than "Spain."

    Tumbleweed Connection is a great album. It's essentially a country music album. Bernie and Elton were heavy into country music when they first started writing together, which was a big part of what bonded them. I used to listen to Tumbleweed Connection quite a bit back in the '70s. I have no idea what happened to the album, but I used to own it. My sister might have sold it to get a few bucks when she was living in Greenwich Village. She sold quite a few of my albums--some of which now are collector's items. [email protected]#$%

    Madman Across the Water is also a great album. It's a bit more emotional and introspective than Tumbleweed and there's not a bad track on the entire album.

    Those are my two favorite Elton John albums. After that, beginning with Honky Chateau, he kind of went a little too pop for my tastes, although each album had one or two gems.

    As far as Bernie Taupin not getting the credit he deserves, it's always the performer who gets all the attention--never the songwriter.

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