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Thread: the bands you hated

  1. #21
    Member Amnesiac's Avatar
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    So many more. Don't get me started on Justin Bieber or whats-her-name that used to be Hannah Montana.

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Amnesiac View Post
    So many more. Don't get me started on Justin Bieber or whats-her-name that used to be Hannah Montana.
    Agreed. Musical proficiency comes first. Being adorable comes somewhere far after that.

  3. #23
    Member Amnesiac's Avatar
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    What's so awful, is that Justin Bieber is actually really talented! There's a YouTube video of him, like 8 years old, playing the drums. He's amazing! This pop idol branding just sucks... It's exploitative.

  4. #24
    Talent becomes irrelevant when your target audience has yet to grow any pubic hair.

    Years ago, my friends and I were placing bets on exactly what date Justin would be found dead in a hotel room.

  5. #25
    I could never stand Jane's Addiction. That song with the dog barking... eeh. Overplayed on the radio.

  6. #26
    Stadium bands like Bon Jovi and Survivor who frequently posture as bad asses, livin' on the edge, when in reality they wear eyeliner and are probably very good to their parents.

    And Styx. I'm pretty sure they have a lyric somewhere that goes, "Why must you be such an angry young man / when your future looks quite bright to me." Rock lyrics should never sound like they were written by a high school guidance counsellor.

  7. #27
    I'll probably get stoned to death for daying this, but I think the Beatles were simply awful, especially when they started doing more experimenting in the late 60s. Their success was based more on their playful image than anything else; they could have recorded an album of burps and be hailed as "geniuses." Critics call them great because they were the fans worshipping them when they were kids.

    People often point to their commercial success as proof of their brilliance, yet the Monkees had the two highest selling albums of 1967, but that doesn't mean they were the best that year. I gave all the Beatles' albums and honest listening to a few years ago to see if I was wrong, but it only reaffirmed my belief.

    Okay...I accept my death sentence and summary execution at the crack of dawn. It was worth it, though.
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  8. #28
    Damn, Dan, you're a brave man!

    I was never a fan, and my ambivalence blossomed into dislike after I roomed with a rabid Beatles fan for a few years. His philosophy was that if you didn't like The Beatles, there was something wrong with your musical tastes. I got over my dislike, now I just think they're somewhat overrated.

    Some thoughts:

    They were great melodists and brilliant songwriters. I admire them for subversively bringing psychedelia into the pop mainstream.

    I first came to listen to them as a result of an interest in the Manson murders. I bought The White Album, which I played a lot. I was always fascinated by "Sexy Sadie"; that odd, tilted piano phrase that opens the song and continues throughout the verses gives it a creepy vibe. Or maybe it's the prescience of the lines "You made a fool of everyone" and "You laid it down for all to see": It was Susan Atkins, nicknamed Sadie after the song, who broke the case by confessing her involvement in the Tate murders to her cellmate. Even without that bit of unpleasant backstory, it's a great song and possibly one of my favorites.

    Sadly, because their early pop period was just too dumb and sweet for me (was "Love Me Do" a love song to a fecalpheliac?), and their later output was marred, at least for me, by what I consider to be an inherently tinny sound (Paul! Plug in your bass! Ringo! Stop huffing ether!) I was never particularly impressed with them and will always associate them with Manson. I suppose that's my cross to bear.

    The track "I Am The Walrus" is a wonderfully odd little thing. If only they had lightened up on it's goofiness and made it a bit darker. For a rock band, they were surprisingly deficient in edginess.

    Songs like "Penny Lane" helped pave the way for the soft rock genre, yet they've gone unpunished. Go figure.

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Rhys View Post
    I'll probably get stoned to death for daying this, but I think the Beatles were simply awful,

    Okay...I accept my death sentence and summary execution at the crack of dawn. It was worth it, though.

    Good. Would you like Jagger or Richards (okay, bad joke, but really? )
    Quote Originally Posted by KenTR View Post
    Damn, Dan, you're a brave man!



    I first came to listen to them as a result of an interest in the Manson murders. I bought The White Album, which I played a lot. I was always fascinated by "Sexy Sadie"; that odd, tilted piano phrase that opens the song and continues throughout the verses gives it a creepy vibe. Or maybe it's the prescience of the lines "You made a fool of everyone" and "You laid it down for all to see": It was Susan Atkins, nicknamed Sadie after the song, who broke the case by confessing her involvement in the Tate murders to her cellmate. Even without that bit of unpleasant backstory, it's a great song and possibly one of my favorites.


    Songs like "Penny Lane" helped pave the way for the soft rock genre, yet they've gone unpunished. Go figure.

    Actually, Sexy Sadie was a nasty Lennon song aimed at the Maharishi so in a way, Susan Atkins was named after the Maharishi.

    Yeah, it's fascinating how someone can take something innocuous (Helter Skleter is actually a playground ride in England, like a see-saw I think) and warp it into something sinister . And how did Dennis Wilson of the Beach Boys get involved with Manson? The late sixties were certainly strange times, indeed.

    As far as the soft rock genre goes, I guess you could call McCartney an influence (think Yesterday more so than Penny Lane though), and God knows why he wrote that horrid Silly Love Songs.
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  10. #30
    that's a first...in all my years..awful.... I've sinned but I will throw the first halfy..
    The only one who can heal you is you.




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