Soundtracks for Novels: legal issues? - Page 2


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Thread: Soundtracks for Novels: legal issues?

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Bloggsworth View Post
    "Fair use" for educational and illustrative purposes, although the Universal Music Group would have you believe otherwise; they strike down Youtube vlogs all the time for no other reason than they can intimidate Google into doing so - It's a very contentious issue as, of course, most vloggers can't afford to take them to court to enforce their "Fair use" rights.
    I fully support the artists and their labels with this topic. If I were to record a YouTube video I would seek out any and all permissions beforehand, especially with owned and copyrighted entertainment. You would be surprised how much you could get permission for without a charge if you'd actually do it right.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Irwin View Post
    You could probably use the song titles without infringing on copyright protection--especially if you just say that you were inspired by the song. That's just a statement of fact. But you could be sued if you use the actual lyrics, unless of course, you get permission, which you should probably also do with the song titles, also, just out of respect.

    It takes a lot of work to write a song, and a lot of talent to write a good song, so don't steal somebody else's creativity.
    I'm sure that namedropping some artists and their lyrics inside of a book isn't infringement but I wouldn't do it because it seems so crass and hangerly.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by marosabooks View Post
    I was told by a publisher you cannot use a song title in any fiction piece unless you have express written consent from the copyright owner. Because it borderlines on "fair use" publishers will not touch it BUT is you are self publishing
    Are you sure about that? Rock bands take lyrics and titles from books and movies all the time without permission. You'd think it would work both ways.

    I've also read plenty of books where dedications quote song lyrics or poems.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Aquilo View Post
    Nah, it's not an audio clip. It's this:

    The author writes the novel, publishes it, then on his website, offers a soundtrack list that they say 'goes' with reading the novel. They also quote song lyrics on their website that they say 'match' the mood they are conveying in the novel, or they match a character they are portraying. In effect, they're using the songs to promote their novel, not from the inside of the cover, but on the author's website.
    I don't know about this. Never seen it before. Must be indy authors.

  5. #15
    I would just take my cue from movie makers who always do the routine of permissions on all of their materials. They make the most money in the entertainment industry so they must be doing something right.

  6. #16
    It makes me uncomfortable when I see it, too. I have no idea of the legality, but it just seems--I don't know. Cheap, maybe? Like, create your own emotional impact, don't borrow it from someone else's work.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Art Man View Post
    I don't know about this. Never seen it before. Must be indy authors.
    The author mentioned in my second post is trade published with Tor and, up until a few weeks back over non-payment disputes of up to $30,000, Dreamspinner Press. I honestly don't know if he has permission or not of all the artists his lists and their song lyrics he uses.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bayview View Post
    It makes me uncomfortable when I see it, too. I have no idea of the legality, but it just seems--I don't know. Cheap, maybe? Like, create your own emotional impact, don't borrow it from someone else's work.
    I know we all say we listened to X track writing, but I'd feel uncomfortable too if it's also put on my author website with the lyrics pinpointing different moments/characters in my work. Grant it's not used in the novel, but it is potentially being used on the website for commercial means to sell a novel.

    I honestly don't know here, but I'm a firm believer that you get permission.
    "You don't wanna ride the bus like this,"

    Mike Posner.



  8. #18
    I'm not certain the novelist is using the song to plug the novel so much as he/she is giving a friendly shout out to another's artist's work which he/she found particularly inspiring (ie: plugging another artist's work--it's free publicity for the other artist/record label).

    I suppose some people might get offended and assume that the novelist is plugging their own work, but I know I wouldn't mention my soundtrack with such intentions as advertising my novel so much as advertising the other artist. Plus, the person finding such a playlist has already found the novel, so no advertising is needed. Book and/or website is already being viewed, so it's crappy advertising.

    I would never buy a book because of the playlist that inspired it, but I might buy an album because an author plugged it and, in doing so, has written a pretty stellar review of said album.
    "Ammonia will disinfect sin."
    --adrianhayter

    "Art is life, just add bull****."
    --Chris Miller

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by seigfried007 View Post
    I'm not certain the novelist is using the song to plug the novel so much as he/she is giving a friendly shout out to another's artist's work which he/she found particularly inspiring (ie: plugging another artist's work--it's free publicity for the other artist/record label).

    I suppose some people might get offended and assume that the novelist is plugging their own work, but I know I wouldn't mention my soundtrack with such intentions as advertising my novel so much as advertising the other artist. Plus, the person finding such a playlist has already found the novel, so no advertising is needed. Book and/or website is already being viewed, so it's crappy advertising.

    I would never buy a book because of the playlist that inspired it, but I might buy an album because an author plugged it and, in doing so, has written a pretty stellar review of said album.
    It's a little different if it's on the author's website, seig, which is set up as a commercial outlet to sell work. By using the lyrics etc, it's in effect saying the artist is happy for his name and lyrics to be used to promote your work. And if that's not the case, the artist can sue, especially if you're writing content that he might not want to be associated with his work. I'm all for promoting artists, but when it comes to commercial outlets like author website, consent should always be the key. It's like you wouldn't put up images on your author website without 1st buying the rights to use them on your website.
    "You don't wanna ride the bus like this,"

    Mike Posner.



  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Aquilo View Post
    It's a little different if it's on the author's website, seig, which is set up as a commercial outlet to sell work. By using the lyrics etc, it's in effect saying the artist is happy for his name and lyrics to be used to promote your work. And if that's not the case, the artist can sue, especially if you're writing content that he might not want to be associated with his work. I'm all for promoting artists, but when it comes to commercial outlets like author website, consent should always be the key. It's like you wouldn't put up images on your author website without 1st buying the rights to use them on your website.
    I get that--I'm just disputing an innately selfish self-plugging motive in all cases. Consent's always key

    I know some artists wouldn't necessarily want their work associated with Pinocchio, for instance. Some might like it, but I can't take it for granted either way, so if I were to use more than a song title or such, I feel like I should get permission (but I wouldn't even know where to start getting permission). The problem with song titles and even some lyrics is that there are half a million songs out there with the same lines and titles.

    Hence, I'm not using more than maybe three words of any given song or title for anything in the book. I also don't want to date the story in any sense of the word by saying what the characters are listening to or recognize; I want it to feel like either sci-fi or modern era, and I want it to age well.
    "Ammonia will disinfect sin."
    --adrianhayter

    "Art is life, just add bull****."
    --Chris Miller

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