I'm always full of writing ideas. - Page 2


Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 19 of 19

Thread: I'm always full of writing ideas.

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Art Man View Post
    My advice would be plenty of rest, a good meal, nothing distracting, nothing of greater importance hanging over you, get your privacy in order and don't overthink yourself into a bout of motionless penwork.
    I have two small children and a high-stress job, so none of the above is possible for me for the time being, unfortunately. I suspect a lot of those with writers block have similar or worse pressures. Whether that is the reason for the block, not sure, but it's true it doesn't help.

    I consider the 'secret' to not be some kind of simplified lifestyle shift to something more zen (although that would be quite nice!) but more a case of...writing. You can actually write through writers block. I do it often. Just start and let the thinking happen on the page. Write five pages and still not working? Start again. Start a hundred times.

    The point is to keep the mind constantly focused on writing as a task that needs to be done, not about harnessing some bullshit creative wind or otherwise taking it too damn seriously, but just thinking and writing what comes. Eventually something does.
    Last edited by luckyscars; August 24th, 2019 at 04:37 AM.
    "If you don't like my peaches, don't shake my tree."

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by luckyscars View Post
    I have two small children and a high-stress job, so none of the above is possible for me for the time being, unfortunately. I suspect a lot of those with writers block have similar or worse pressures. Whether that is the reason for the block, not sure, but it's true it doesn't help.

    I consider the 'secret' to not be some kind of simplified lifestyle shift to something more zen (although that would be quite nice!) but more a case of...writing. You can actually write through writers block. I do it often. Just start and let the thinking happen on the page. Write five pages and still not working? Start again. Start a hundred times.

    The point is to keep the mind constantly focused on writing as a task that needs to be done, not about harnessing some bullshit creative wind or otherwise taking it too damn seriously, but just thinking and writing what comes. Eventually something does.
    Okay, so a bug in my keyboard just happened, and I had to restart the laptop... and lost a big, super emotional post that nobody was likely to read anyway.

    For the two cases where I've conquered the block, I did what Lucky described here. I had to sit up very late, repeatedly, and hammer out a scene after pimp slapping the characters into doing *something.* Then I had to keep doing it because the scene wouldn't generally work out the way it was supposed to. The characters were too emotional, too overwhelmed, and the tiniest changes would send the scene into radically different directions--some of which were totally incompatible with the plots I needed to write.

    For both stories, I was in great suffering personally, and I was writing stories and characters that reflected aspects of my varied personal traumas and trials. If the trauma's mutated and parceled out in fiction, it should be easier to deal with for said suffering party, and this has led to a lot of very emotional writing and characters over the years for me (lots of other writers have done this, too).

    Everything combined to make writing these stories a slice of hell--between characters who were running from pain, to the stress of inflicting it on them, to having to relive it via writing them, to all the stress and truly awful shit going on in my personal waking life while I was trying to write these stories. It made for a perfect storm of writer's block.

    The thing about writing uncomfortable stories is that they're a self-inflicted torture--you can walk away from the anguish incurred in writing them, and it's very tempting to do just that. But running from the pain doesn't actually make it disappear--for the real life writer or for the story and characters. That pain has to be dragged out and dealt with eventually.

    For my recent breaking back into Pinocchio, the characters were overwhelmed and not cooperative. One basically went on strike and refused to move for years--she just shut down on me. The other characters were mostly trying to gauge her reactions and react to whatever she did, so when she stopped moving, all the action ground to a halt.

    My solution eventually became to have the least overwhelmed character (the baby) do something which would necessitate the other characters acting. So, whenever she would lock up on me (and she did it several times over the ensuing scenes), I would have the baby or some other character so something. She needed some time to process a lot of stress, and she needed to let some of that pressure out.

    Because the characters are so on-edge, are such high-demand individuals, it often requires multiple "takes" directing the action. The smallest changes in a conversation can have disastrous consequences for the scene, and this means I get to rewrite some scenes many, many times in order to achieve a version we can all live with that will move the plot in a direction I need it to go. It takes a lot of time and is very frustrating, but it's better I do it this way than turn them all into plot puppets. It's an entirely character-driven novel, so I can't skimp out and make them 2D--even momentarily.
    "Ammonia will disinfect sin."
    --adrianhayter

    "Art is life, just add bull****."
    --Chris Miller

  3. #13
    I just don't believe it exists in the way it is described. I don't go around being unsympathetic to those who claim they 'cannot write'...but I don't believe them.

    To me, writers block is usually one of two things. It's either a form of laziness (consciously or subconsciously not wanting to write) or it's a form of weakness (letting external factors overwhelm you into not writing). In either case, it's disingenuous to speak about it in terms of some intractable ailment.

    Writing shouldn't be emotionally or psychologically painful, it should be the opposite. That's true even if the story itself might be difficult to write - often it's even more true if the story is difficult. The whole point of being a writer is to obtain relief, to feel free, not to feel stressed, pressured, or chained.
    "If you don't like my peaches, don't shake my tree."

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by luckyscars View Post
    I just don't believe it exists in the way it is described. I don't go around being unsympathetic to those who claim they 'cannot write'...but I don't believe them.

    To me, writers block is usually one of two things. It's either a form of laziness (consciously or subconsciously not wanting to write) or it's a form of weakness (letting external factors overwhelm you into not writing). In either case, it's disingenuous to speak about it in terms of some intractable ailment.

    Writing shouldn't be emotionally or psychologically painful, it should be the opposite. That's true even if the story itself might be difficult to write - often it's even more true if the story is difficult. The whole point of being a writer is to obtain relief, to feel free, not to feel stressed, pressured, or chained.
    Most writing isn't painful like these two stories have been for me. That 10K is illegal to post here in full, if that means anything to you. We write very different stories.

    Relief comes after the pain--it's like lancing a deep, infected wound. All that pus needs draining, but all new holes have to be made to let that crap out. It's not pleasant, but it comes with catharsis afterward. There's a tremendous relief to the soul to get it out finally--but that doesn't mean that jabbing a fat needle in the soul and squeezing out that whopping ton of pus is going to be pleasant at all.

    I'm not going to call a psychological block on writing something painful "laziness"--whether it's conscious or not. There are lots of terrible coping mechanisms out there--and many of these require forgetting things and avoiding painful stimuli. Sometimes, those just keep the pain in and let it fester somewhere deep inside where it's less visible. Laziness is a conscious thing--a desire to not do stuff that needs to get done for physical reasons. In this case, writer's block is a pain-avoidance coping mechanism--and it can eventually make it harder to heal right. The infection just moves further in where it's less visible and winds up causing more damage in the long run. It's unhealthy to avoid writing out the pain, but it's not lazy.
    "Ammonia will disinfect sin."
    --adrianhayter

    "Art is life, just add bull****."
    --Chris Miller

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by seigfried007 View Post
    Laziness is a conscious thing--a desire to not do stuff that needs to get done for physical reasons.
    I disagree.

    Laziness isn't necessarily conscious at all, and it certainly isn't necessarily physical. That's your subjective definition.

    I'm not saying its simple, by the way. Laziness can be built on fear of the unknown, fear of rejection, lots of things. The human brain constructs plenty of coping mechanisms and other ways to shirk responsibility and come up with reasons not to do things. One can dress it up in all the fancy pop-psych language and metaphor you want, can nitpick the semantics, but the result is the same: Nothing actually happening while life continues to drain away.

    I choose to call it laziness, probably because I am a horrible, soulless person, as you have previously mentioned...but I also know that I am also an incredibly lazy person by nature, and that was the main reason for my 'writers block'. The urge to do nothing affects me constantly. Getting over that was hard, but part of getting over it was understanding it never actually existed, that if I didn't write I wouldn't have the result.

    I feel this almost fetishistic obsession with helplessness in the face of challenge is probably the worst, most destructive human trait there is. Suddenly, deadbeat dads have a fatherhood block ​and cheating spouses have a commitment block and everybody can plead pain-avoidance (like writing is mandatory?) and being a victim of their own incompatibility with reality and effort.

    Don't want to call it lazy? That's totally fine by me, I get it's not nice and possibly may upset certain types. The salient point I am making is that whatever it is that causes inability to write, the writer is not a passive player (unless you want to claim God or Biff the Bully is doing it), the writer is not being blocked. There's only one cure for not writing, and that's writing.

    Anyway, I'm off this topic and forum for tonight. I have a new story to send out.
    Last edited by luckyscars; August 24th, 2019 at 07:25 AM.
    "If you don't like my peaches, don't shake my tree."

  6. #16
    S'all cool anyway, Lucky. We disagree on definitions regarding specifics but fundamentally agree on most everything you've said. I don't think you're soulless, even if you can come off as quite abrasive and insensitive sometimes. Good luck with your story.

    I've never implied that the writer is passive in this. Writing is an active thing for fingers and mind alike (even if it's a sedentary profession). The cure is definitely writing through whatever's causing the blockage, as you've already stated (and I agreed with already--and gave evidence for how well it's worked for me). Eventually, the writer just has to bulldoze through it.

    Most stories can be shat out and bulldozed through, but some do require extra sensitivity, and that's so far where I've had more difficulty. I'm a bit of a perfectionist when it comes to really sensitive subjects. I also hate continuity errors. Both of those can shut a project down for awhile because then said author has to do some serious retooling and examination of the work on a much bigger scale. sometimes a writer has to take on easier projects and get some more experience, skill and distance to write a story properly.

    If I'd finished Pinocchio earlier, it would've been such shit, Lucky, so I'm glad now I waited to get back into it. I'm also glad that I've been arguing/discussing with you. Between you and Rojack, oddly enough, you've been great at getting me to think along just the lines I've needed to be thinking on to make this story work. I didn't know where to go with it then because I didn't know what it was actually about, apparently. Over the course of this conversation, I've actually figured some huge stuff out, and if I can pull this sucker off, it might be the best thing I'll ever write. I'm almost certain I'll never come up with a bigger, better, more beautiful mindf*** than this story.

    Out of curiosity, have you bumped into characters that you thought you knew, but you didn't really know before?
    "Ammonia will disinfect sin."
    --adrianhayter

    "Art is life, just add bull****."
    --Chris Miller

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by luckyscars View Post
    I'm not sure what the discussion aspect of this thread is about as there doesn't seem to be a question or anything particularly needing a response.

    I must say, though, that it would behoove us all to be mindful that posting about how much writing we do/how limitless or great our ideas are, especially without any evidence being offered or any prompting, is a little cheap if it comes without a point to it.

    Like, okay, you want a medal for having ideas and being able to write them down? I write constantly and I don't get writers block either. It means nothing. At least not to anybody besides the lucky bragger. It doesn't help others to say you don't need help.
    I assumed it was a a thread where the prolific writers offer suggestions to those struggling with writer's block.
    There are techniques for avoiding WB.
    And also, sometimes these threads are just chatting about writer stuff.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by luckyscars View Post
    I just don't believe it exists in the way it is described. I don't go around being unsympathetic to those who claim they 'cannot write'...but I don't believe them.

    To me, writers block is usually one of two things. It's either a form of laziness (consciously or subconsciously not wanting to write) or it's a form of weakness (letting external factors overwhelm you into not writing). In either case, it's disingenuous to speak about it in terms of some intractable ailment.

    Writing shouldn't be emotionally or psychologically painful, it should be the opposite. That's true even if the story itself might be difficult to write - often it's even more true if the story is difficult. The whole point of being a writer is to obtain relief, to feel free, not to feel stressed, pressured, or chained.
    Maybe writers block is a form of hypnotism, you know, when a hypnotist hypnotises someone they can appear conscious but be mentally empty.
    Last edited by Art Man; August 24th, 2019 at 10:17 PM.

  9. #19

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
This website uses cookies
We use cookies to store session information to facilitate remembering your login information, to allow you to save website preferences, to personalise content and ads, to provide social media features and to analyse our traffic. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners.