Which part of a story is the most important one: the beginning, the middle or the end


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Thread: Which part of a story is the most important one: the beginning, the middle or the end

  1. #1

    Which part of a story is the most important one: the beginning, the middle or the end

    Which part of a story is the most important one: the beginning, the middle, or the ending?

  2. #2
    I'd say the beginning. The middle and end won't matter much if the reader doesn't get that far.

  3. #3
    They’re all equally important from a big picture perspective, but I work hardest on the particulars on the beginning, because a strong beginning typically creates a pathway that carries the writer (as reader) to the end. It’s also typically the part editors ask for in query so needs to be on point. If your beginning isn’t good enough probably nobody will stick around, right?
    "If you don't like my peaches, don't shake my tree."

  4. #4
    dp
    Last edited by Ken11; August 16th, 2019 at 07:19 PM.

  5. #5
    My opinion on this topic is the same one given by luckyscars.

    Why don't they? Because the beginning is what makes your readers stop reading. I think there is a book called the first 50 pages. Don't think of getting that book though anyways since it doesn't help. When a person opens a book they will read from the beginning to see if it is a compelling buy. I myself would do the same when going to bookstores.

    Without a good beginning you will never get to the middle or ending of a story. It sounds obvious. But a quick glance at a book's beginning is what determines if it sells.
    I would follow as in believe in the words of good moral leaders. Rather than the beliefs of oneself.
    The most difficult thing for a writer to comprehend is to experience silence, so speak up. (quoted from a member)

  6. #6
    So, people would buy a let's day 300 pages novel, in order to only enjoy the first fifty pages?

    Or, on the order hand I am wrong about the whole thing, and have failed to see that good fifty pages' start makes the rest too interesting?

  7. #7
    It's just the reader's behavior as believed by agents who put down your manuscript if the beginning isn't strong. Other things factor too, but that is the most common argument and I unfortunately agree with it.
    I would follow as in believe in the words of good moral leaders. Rather than the beliefs of oneself.
    The most difficult thing for a writer to comprehend is to experience silence, so speak up. (quoted from a member)

  8. #8
    There is no one most important part of a novel. The opening needs to provide the reader with a reason to keep reading. The middle needs to develop story and character. And the end needs to bring everything together in a satisfying manner. To focus on one more than the others is lazy and does a disservice to the entire work.
    “Fools” said I, “You do not know
    Silence like a cancer grows
    Hear my words that I might teach you
    Take my arms that I might reach you”
    But my words like silent raindrops fell
    And echoed in the wells of silence : Simon & Garfunkel


    Those who enjoy stirring the chamber-pot should be required to lick the spoon.

    Our job as writers is to make readers dream, to infiltrate their minds with our words and create a new reality; a reality not theirs, and not ours, but a new, unique combination of both.

    Visit Amazon and the Kindle Store to check out Reflections in a Black Mirror, and Chase

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  9. #9
    I think I missed the big picture of the argument but also agree with what terry d said. So I am probably wrong.
    I would follow as in believe in the words of good moral leaders. Rather than the beliefs of oneself.
    The most difficult thing for a writer to comprehend is to experience silence, so speak up. (quoted from a member)

  10. #10
    It must be that agents want to find out more about a writer's style, drive, etc. in those 50 pages.

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