More personal opions on metal/punk bands, especially from the 70's/80's - Page 2


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Thread: More personal opions on metal/punk bands, especially from the 70's/80's

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Rojack79 View Post
    Let's see, Love Linkin Park, Green Day, Rise Against The Machine, Avenged Sevenfold, Disturbed, Metallica, And Dragon Force. All are great and all are still around today and relevant.
    Vert dee Ferk? Rise Against the Machine? Do you mean Rage Against the Machine? Half of Linkin Park is dead. Rage Against the Machine broke up.

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    "Ammonia will disinfect sin."
    --adrianhayter

    "Art is life, just add bull****."
    --Chris Miller

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by seigfried007 View Post
    Vert dee Ferk? Rise Against the Machine? Do you mean Rage Against the Machine? Half of Linkin Park is dead. Rage Against the Machine broke up.

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    I actually ment Rise Against. They are still around I believe and yes it is sad to see what has become of Rage and Linkin.
    This might not be my best work but that just means there's room to improve.

    I don't have a big ego. You just can't comprehend my greatness!

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Rojack79 View Post
    I actually ment Rise Against. They are still around I believe and yes it is sad to see what has become of Rage and Linkin.
    I'd wondered if it was accidental portmanteau of Rise Against and Rage Against the Machine. Makes me want mashups because it's already a great title for a collaboration band!
    "Ammonia will disinfect sin."
    --adrianhayter

    "Art is life, just add bull****."
    --Chris Miller

  4. #14
    And the OP specifically set the time frame in the 1970s and 80s.

    Guys like Frank Zappa get no love from this generation. The man was whip smart, a social savage and bent the strings with the best of them. Testified in Congress against censorship.
    But they all know Aerosmith and AC / DC. Dude.

    "Now let's all agree, never to be creative again."




  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Winston View Post
    And the OP specifically set the time frame in the 1970s and 80s.

    Guys like Frank Zappa get no love from this generation. The man was whip smart, a social savage and bent the strings with the best of them. Testified in Congress against censorship.
    But they all know Aerosmith and AC / DC. Dude.
    Audiophiles come in two basic flavors: 1) people who continue broadening their horizons and listening to new music, and 2) people who stop listening to new music and prefer to never grow up, perpetually stuck in their golden ages of youth. I've seen a lot of both in every fandom of music. A metalhead from the 70-80's era may still listen to newer music. I can't tell you how many people I've met in the 60-90 age range who have continued listening to new music and love some newer bands (especially in the Tool fandom).

    I've heard of Zappa and probably listened to him without realizing it. I grew up on rock from that era, but I never learned a lot of the band names or who did which song (unless it was a band my dad bought albums of instead of passively listening to on the radio). My dad wan't into that era of punk or metal though, so my exposure was minimal. I got into rock as a teenager, and I've been exploring metal far more recently. YouTube has done wonders to expand my horizons--and I've had wide tastes a long time.

    Sadly, until recently, a lot of what people listen to was based on radio, and this meant that a lot of the really hard-hitting excellent bands didn't get airtime. Yeah, they were great, but they were polarizing. They weren't insipid and milquetoast and lowest common denominator to get that airtime, which is all about maximizing audience and therefore catering to a presumed majority of people in an area. It's really sad because there were so many amazing bands that were denied the airtime.

    For instance, in the 90s when I started listening to alternative rock station (the only one in the area), what hooked me was actually Nine Inch Nails "Closer", Metallica's "Until It Sleeps", Tool's "Sober" and Seven Mary Three's "Water's Edge". Prior to that, I'd mostly listened to pop and hip hop because it's what everyone else my age listened to and what I got to hear on the bus to school. Those songs rocked my world--it was a whole new world of music. Not my dad's relatively bland classic rock preferences but something that felt controversial, graphic, meaningful, emotional. It was like taking a musical brick to the face--and I loved it.

    Now that station's been bought out by some national conglomerate. It doesn't play that stuff hardly ever--if ever. It's soooooo bland by comparison. About the hardest thing they play is Linkin Park reruns from the early 2000s. It's more like the elevator music equivalent of rock because it's built for mass appeal--and not bricking people to the face.
    "Ammonia will disinfect sin."
    --adrianhayter

    "Art is life, just add bull****."
    --Chris Miller

  6. #16
    Member Rojack79's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by seigfried007 View Post
    Audiophiles come in two basic flavors: 1) people who continue broadening their horizons and listening to new music, and 2) people who stop listening to new music and prefer to never grow up, perpetually stuck in their golden ages of youth. I've seen a lot of both in every fandom of music. A metalhead from the 70-80's era may still listen to newer music. I can't tell you how many people I've met in the 60-90 age range who have continued listening to new music and love some newer bands (especially in the Tool fandom).

    I've heard of Zappa and probably listened to him without realizing it. I grew up on rock from that era, but I never learned a lot of the band names or who did which song (unless it was a band my dad bought albums of instead of passively listening to on the radio). My dad wan't into that era of punk or metal though, so my exposure was minimal. I got into rock as a teenager, and I've been exploring metal far more recently. YouTube has done wonders to expand my horizons--and I've had wide tastes a long time.

    Sadly, until recently, a lot of what people listen to was based on radio, and this meant that a lot of the really hard-hitting excellent bands didn't get airtime. Yeah, they were great, but they were polarizing. They weren't insipid and milquetoast and lowest common denominator to get that airtime, which is all about maximizing audience and therefore catering to a presumed majority of people in an area. It's really sad because there were so many amazing bands that were denied the airtime.

    For instance, in the 90s when I started listening to alternative rock station (the only one in the area), what hooked me was actually Nine Inch Nails "Closer", Metallica's "Until It Sleeps", Tool's "Sober" and Seven Mary Three's "Water's Edge". Prior to that, I'd mostly listened to pop and hip hop because it's what everyone else my age listened to and what I got to hear on the bus to school. Those songs rocked my world--it was a whole new world of music. Not my dad's relatively bland classic rock preferences but something that felt controversial, graphic, meaningful, emotional. It was like taking a musical brick to the face--and I loved it.

    Now that station's been bought out by some national conglomerate. It doesn't play that stuff hardly ever--if ever. It's soooooo bland by comparison. About the hardest thing they play is Linkin Park reruns from the early 2000s. It's more like the elevator music equivalent of rock because it's built for mass appeal--and not bricking people to the face.
    Brick to the face!!!! For me I grew up in the nineties era but i love 50's music. Now back to the nineties. For me my personal brick's to the face were Dragon Force, Sonata Arctica, Within Temptation, Beethoven, and, Frank Sinatra. All of there music has had an impact on my life in one way or another.
    This might not be my best work but that just means there's room to improve.

    I don't have a big ego. You just can't comprehend my greatness!

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by seigfried007 View Post
    I'm not very good with "punk", but I haven't found them "revolutionary".
    Punk rock itself wasn't revolutionary. It actually kinda sucked. But what it did was re-introduce the DIY concept to a whole new generation. That's what was revolutionary.

  8. #18
    Music Guru Trollheart's Avatar
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    Sounds like you need to talk to my friends at Music Banter. Head over there and ask for the Batlord (he's changed his name since I left, but they'll know who you mean). Just don't put any dinner on because the guy will talk to you about metal till he drops, but hell he's a fount of knowledge. Tell him I sent ya. Oh no wait, don't...
    Come away, human child to the waters and the wild
    With a faery hand in hand.
    For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand. - WB Yeats "The Stolen Child"

    I drink to forget, but I never forget to drink.

    "If the real Jesus Christ were to stand up today
    He'd be gunned down cold by the CIA" - The The, "Armageddon Days Are Here (Again)" - Mind Bomb, 1989

    Quoted by Ralph Rotten
    The most destructive force on the planet is not nukes or global warming...it is the human ego.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Winston View Post
    Politics and culture intersect heavily into rock. The harder the rock, the rougher the merge.
    An old Punk is a revolutionary that refused to give up. An old Metal head is a partier that refused to grow up.
    It's true that metal has less of a political focus, but I listen to almost exclusively metal and I've never got the impression that it's just about partying and having fun. It's almost the antithesis to that, honestly. Yeah there are those bands like Guns n' Roses, but I view them the way you as a punk would view Green Day. Mythology, religion, storytelling, that's the scope of metal.

    The difference in concert feel does have to do with the number. At AudioFeed festival I saw both punk and metal bands, all probably with crowds under 100. The biggest different in culture/style I could note is that punk is very grounded and human (the word 'anarchy, which I associate with political movements and the attack on social norms, is appropriate). Metal, on the other hand, ups the aggression to 11, and feels more spiritual and often otherworldly (here, the word 'chaos,' although in dictionary definition meaning about the same thing as anarchy, is more appropriate, because it calls to mind gods, monsters, universes). But in both, you're united in the intensity of the music.

    So to the OP:

    Satan is a lesser-known but very good 80s metal band. Alone in the Dark (which got rendered Alone in the Dock by some accident) is a masterpiece. Another, slightly better known, is Savatage. Both these have a similar style to Judas Priest and Iron Maiden, with mostly fantasy lyrics. They're the kind of band your older character might know about that your younger one is unaware of--not famous enough to have songs playing on Classic Rock radio, but not so obscure that it would seem odd to have characters know about them.

    Another one is Saint (Disclaimer: they are a Christian band, and thus veery obscure and underrated. Don't know if it would make sense for your characters to be listening to them, but I thought I'd mention them because they're from California.)

    If you're looking for more extreme, underground stuff, Bathory, Venom, and Sodom (black metal. Sodom later turned into a thrash metal band, but the other two sparked the genre) were already coming out with stuff in the 80s. 80s death metal is a thing, too, but I'm less acquainted with it.

    I'm probably as clueless as you when it comes to punk. Rancid, Dead Kennedys, Sex Pistols, Bad Brains? The Crucified is another weird Christian band I'm into, but they're more crossover.

    As to the why, I'd suggest listening to some of the music and getting a feel.
    "So long is the way to the unknown, long is the way we have come. . ." ~ Turisas, Five Hundred and One

    "[An artist is] an idiot babbling through town. . .crying, 'Dreams, dreams for sale! Two for a kopek, two for a song; if you won't buy them, just take them for free!'" ~ Michael O' Brien,
    Sophia House

    Christ is risen from the dead,
    trampling on Death by death,
    And on those in the tombs,
    lavishing light.



  10. #20
    I'm probably as clueless as you when it comes to punk. Rancid, Dead Kennedys, Sex Pistols, Bad Brains?
    Per the OP:
    Rancid was a 1990's band, Sex Pistols are from England and Bad Brains was an East Coast band (circa 1977).
    The DK's were the only band you listed that was both 1980's and California. But there were many others. One of the best in terms of representing the genre was a band called "Victim's Family" (1984) from my home town of Santa Rosa, CA. They focused on a diverse / fusion style that defied labels. Northern California was always a stew pot of hippies, bohemians and counter-culture anarchists. They captured that vibe.

    And I am clueless when it comes to throat singing and playing at 600 beats per minute. But if you have any Punk Rock questions, I should be able to help.

    "Now let's all agree, never to be creative again."




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