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Thread: Dungeons and Dragons

  1. #1
    Member Underd0g's Avatar
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    Dungeons and Dragons

    A childhood friend of one of my sons is now a Doctor of Psychology. He has recently started using D&D as a way to encourage self-awareness and problem solving in a group therapy setting.
    He works with those with PTSD and such.
    It made me wonder if anyone here has ever written scenarios for Dungeons and Dragons.
    It was something that was after my time so I never played or became familiar with it but I thought there may be a few members here that have had experience with the game.
    I wanted to know how many scenes needed to be written and if there are certain guidelines or parameters that needed to be followed.

    Thanks in advance.

    Also if you might comment on what you might think of the idea of using it for therapy.
    If you look at my profile, say "Hi!" But not in a creepy way.

  2. #2
    As a kid, I was pretty into D&D. I wrote a bunch of different campaigns. I haven't played it in over thirty years....
    Her: I love my computer! All of my friends are in there!
    Me: Yeah, I was thinking the same thing about my freezer...
    Her: What?
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amnesiac View Post
    As a kid, I was pretty into D&D. I wrote a bunch of different campaigns. I haven't played it in over thirty years....
    So they're called campaigns. See? I'm learning already.
    If you look at my profile, say "Hi!" But not in a creepy way.

  4. #4
    Yes. There was a whole raft of books that went with being a dungeon master. The company, TSR, was headed by Gary Gygax, back then. The books, as I remember them, were, "Monster Manual" books I and II, "Unearthed Arcana," and there were a couple of others that I can't remember. They were hardbound and very expensive, back then. There were all sorts of dice too, and they were used for rolling up a new character, figuring out how much damage a certain attack, weapon, or spell did, how much damage certain armor could withstand, etc.
    Her: I love my computer! All of my friends are in there!
    Me: Yeah, I was thinking the same thing about my freezer...
    Her: What?
    Me: What?

  5. #5
    Tabletop RPGs vary a lot; even within DnD how the GM approaches a session or campaign varies a lot. The two extremes are writing down every scene in minute detail to winging the entire thing. I err towards the latter; i don't understand why i'd play a game when every scene is pre-set - i'll read a book if i want that. I've found DnD encourages the former so run and play different systems.

    If you're really interested, i'm sure there will be groups near you (maybe Pathfinder - very similar to DnD). Otherwise you can watch sessions online - i can recommend some good ones if you like.

    As for therapy: i'm sure it helps some people - whether that is above the benefits you'd get of getting together with some mates and having a good time i'm not so sure. There're a fair few publications on the subject, but i'm not inclined to start digging into their quality.

  6. #6
    Member Underd0g's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amnesiac View Post
    Yes. There was a whole raft of books that went with being a dungeon master. The company, TSR, was headed by Gary Gygax, back then. The books, as I remember them, were, "Monster Manual" books I and II, "Unearthed Arcana," and there were a couple of others that I can't remember. They were hardbound and very expensive, back then. There were all sorts of dice too, and they were used for rolling up a new character, figuring out how much damage a certain attack, weapon, or spell did, how much damage certain armor could withstand, etc.
    Ok, I'm finding out that battles have a lot to do with the experience. I used to play Risk. Man that was a lot of the rolling of dice.
    Thank you for the referrals!



    Quote Originally Posted by epimetheus View Post
    Tabletop RPGs vary a lot; even within DnD how the GM approaches a session or campaign varies a lot. The two extremes are writing down every scene in minute detail to winging the entire thing. I err towards the latter; i don't understand why i'd play a game when every scene is pre-set - i'll read a book if i want that. I've found DnD encourages the former so run and play different systems.

    If you're really interested, i'm sure there will be groups near you (maybe Pathfinder - very similar to DnD). Otherwise you can watch sessions online - i can recommend some good ones if you like.

    As for therapy: i'm sure it helps some people - whether that is above the benefits you'd get of getting together with some mates and having a good time i'm not so sure. There're a fair few publications on the subject, but i'm not inclined to start digging into their quality.
    Ha, I call Bingo at the local senior center and what I do is get a couple of longer jokes but also prepare a bunch of one-liners to fill in between rounds. The over 65 crowd is the best audience.
    I guess over preparing would assist in making it entertaining, but it seems a lot of what you prepare wouldn't get used. But it seems like it would be fun to treat it like improvisation.
    Feel free to PM me with those recommendations. I'm sure I wouldn't be able to find such specific sites. YouTube is my go to place to find information.

    I have a few motives for learning more. My son's friend simply put this in front of me and I'm motivated for now. For some reason I think it might help me write. I like things that encourage interaction and connecting.
    If you look at my profile, say "Hi!" But not in a creepy way.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by epimetheus View Post
    Tabletop RPGs vary a lot; even within DnD how the GM approaches a session or campaign varies a lot. The two extremes are writing down every scene in minute detail to winging the entire thing. I err towards the latter; i don't understand why i'd play a game when every scene is pre-set - i'll read a book if i want that. I've found DnD encourages the former so run and play different systems.
    As someone who's just crashing into D&D (but has written for quite a lot of collaborative stories/RPs), I find the best approach is to balance planning with winging it. The best way to do this is not so much to handcraft each and every scene in the most ludicrous detail, but to craft the framework for the scene. Create a description of each potential area and scenario the adventurers might encounter, along with potential adversaries, and let them figure out how the rest of it goes. That way, you don't run the risk of railroading your party that comes with planning, nor do you end up running out of ideas like most entry-level pantsers do.

    In the context of D&D, that's precisely what the extended reading material (such as the Monster Manual) is for. Instead of spending hours creating stuff right off the bat, most of what you need is already there.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Underd0g View Post
    Feel free to PM me with those recommendations. I'm sure I wouldn't be able to find such specific sites. YouTube is my go to place to find information.
    I'll put them ere in case anyone else is interested:

    This one shows how one GM prepares notes for a session.



    same guy preparing a campaign:


    This one is just a play through - bunch of voice actors playing, so some pretty good improv - it's the first video these guys did so it's not the best one, they get better as they go


    Quote Originally Posted by The Carcosan Herald View Post
    In the context of D&D, that's precisely what the extended reading material (such as the Monster Manual) is for. Instead of spending hours creating stuff right off the bat, most of what you need is already there.
    Monster manuals are very useful, but even with those i find myself changing bits.

    The Star Wars RPG has cards for each 'monster' - i find those pretty handy, less flicking through books, just take out the ones you think you'll need for the session.

  9. #9
    I played years ago. My son is just getting in to it with his friends, roping my 2 daughters in to a game or 2.

    As has been mentioned, you make an outline, have a few ideas of who/what/where and when, then do some stuff on the fly.

    I always found I could make my players think they made the decision to do something when I actually subtly steered them in that direction. But on many occasions, I would set up a scenario with multiple ways to solve the problem.
    But as with many things, there are always those that think outside the box. This resulted in some very bizarre, yet successful, resolutions to a problem.

    Regarding therapy, I guess it depends on the cause of the condition. But having a situation where you need to solve a problem a specific way, but need the players to come up with it themselves, start with small issues, like a little problem for a town or something. Keep the situations happening, slowing getting bigger and bigger, but still having the best way for the players to resolve it is to use whatever method is preferred. So slowly retrain their minds.

    Just my thoughts.
    If we surround ourselves with 'yes' people, how can we grow.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Carcosan Herald View Post
    As someone who's just crashing into D&D (but has written for quite a lot of collaborative stories/RPs), I find the best approach is to balance planning with winging it. The best way to do this is not so much to handcraft each and every scene in the most ludicrous detail, but to craft the framework for the scene. Create a description of each potential area and scenario the adventurers might encounter, along with potential adversaries, and let them figure out how the rest of it goes. That way, you don't run the risk of railroading your party that comes with planning, nor do you end up running out of ideas like most entry-level pantsers do.

    In the context of D&D, that's precisely what the extended reading material (such as the Monster Manual) is for. Instead of spending hours creating stuff right off the bat, most of what you need is already there.

    Thank you; so collaborative stories and RPs. Could you elaborate? I'm wondering about long range goals for myself. I'm seeing some prepared works. I'm looking to write original content, I guess that could be copyrightable. Are RPs something like those dinner theater murder mysteries? I like the idea of coming up with lateral thinking puzzles where the participants ask questions or make attempts, 20 questions style.

    Quote Originally Posted by epimetheus View Post
    I'll put them here in case anyone else is interested:
    Thank you, the links are helping me get a grasp of what it's about. Read my response above your quote and comment if you would. I'm trying to tailor make it for my own uses. I love this party game:
    https://www.playwerewolf.co/rules

    I'm interested in creating party games.
    If you look at my profile, say "Hi!" But not in a creepy way.

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