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Thread: Dungeons and Dragons

  1. #11
    Member Underd0g's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MadMickyG View Post
    I played years ago. My son is just getting in to it with his friends, roping my 2 daughters in to a game or 2.

    As has been mentioned, you make an outline, have a few ideas of who/what/where and when, then do some stuff on the fly.

    I always found I could make my players think they made the decision to do something when I actually subtly steered them in that direction. But on many occasions, I would set up a scenario with multiple ways to solve the problem.
    But as with many things, there are always those that think outside the box. This resulted in some very bizarre, yet successful, resolutions to a problem.

    Regarding therapy, I guess it depends on the cause of the condition. But having a situation where you need to solve a problem a specific way, but need the players to come up with it themselves, start with small issues, like a little problem for a town or something. Keep the situations happening, slowing getting bigger and bigger, but still having the best way for the players to resolve it is to use whatever method is preferred. So slowly retrain their minds.

    Just my thoughts.
    Thank you. Read post ten to see the direction I'd like to go with my questions, but also thank you for your opinion of it with therapy. I want to encourage my friend in his endeavor for using it as therapy. I listened to a podcast that he did and it makes sense. I'll be sending your feedback to him. He's interested in people's perspectives.

    I definitely see the potential for steering people in certain directions. I guess you could "fudge" some of the interpretations of the player's responses. I love thinking outside the box. My favorite lateral thinking puzzle is the one where there is a man that is afraid to go home because of another man who is wearing a mask. Spoiler alert..... The man wearing the mask is Johnny Bench.
    If you look at my profile, say "Hi!" But not in a creepy way.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Underd0g View Post
    Thank you; so collaborative stories and RPs. Could you elaborate? I'm wondering about long range goals for myself. I'm seeing some prepared works. I'm looking to write original content, I guess that could be copyrightable. Are RPs something like those dinner theater murder mysteries? I like the idea of coming up with lateral thinking puzzles where the participants ask questions or make attempts, 20 questions style.
    Again, depends. Some systems are geared towards mystery (Cthulhu comes to mind), while others towards fight scenes (DnD).

    In terms of collaborative storytelling there are several ways of doing it. I let my players create parts of the world related to their character (kingdoms, secret societies, gods - whatever fits their character and the world setting), then have a discussion about what motivates the character and what the player wants out of the game.

    In game character choices also change the narrative - you can introduce an NPC who is an estranged brother, parted on bad terms. Whether it ends in a redeemed relationship, death or somewhere in between should be up to the player (and the dice, to a lesser extent).

    Quote Originally Posted by Underd0g View Post
    Thank you, the links are helping me get a grasp of what it's about. Read my response above your quote and comment if you would. I'm trying to tailor make it for my own uses. I love this party game:
    https://www.playwerewolf.co/rules

    I'm interested in creating party games.
    There's some great party games out there. Cards against humanity and Spyfall are probably my favourite at the moment - both quite old now.

  3. #13
    DND has such a bad stigma around it. But it really helps a lot. I know a lot of people with hardcore social anxiety go to DnD and are able to really open up. the game is great for getting groups of friends, or even meeting new people with similar interest together.

  4. #14
    Member Underd0g's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by epimetheus View Post
    Again, depends. Some systems are geared towards mystery (Cthulhu comes to mind), while others towards fight scenes (DnD).

    In terms of collaborative storytelling there are several ways of doing it. I let my players create parts of the world related to their character (kingdoms, secret societies, gods - whatever fits their character and the world setting), then have a discussion about what motivates the character and what the player wants out of the game.

    In game character choices also change the narrative - you can introduce an NPC who is an estranged brother, parted on bad terms. Whether it ends in a redeemed relationship, death or somewhere in between should be up to the player (and the dice, to a lesser extent).



    There's some great party games out there. Cards against humanity and Spyfall are probably my favourite at the moment - both quite old now.
    That's interesting about character choices in order to mix it up.

    Thanks for the referrals, never heard of "Spyfall", it looks like great fun.
    I like a form of Cards Against Humanity that's a little more family friendly... Apples to Apples. Depending on who's playing, I take out the politically triggering cards.



    Quote Originally Posted by JesterTRT View Post
    DND has such a bad stigma around it. But it really helps a lot. I know a lot of people with hardcore social anxiety go to DnD and are able to really open up. the game is great for getting groups of friends, or even meeting new people with similar interest together.
    Lol, don't know if you're talking about Satanic Panic or the nerdiness of DND but yeah, it's gotten a bad rap. To me it's just creative writing and fiction. I remember when Rug Rats was feared that it was going to incite rebellion in toddlers.
    If you look at my profile, say "Hi!" But not in a creepy way.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Underd0g View Post
    I like a form of Cards Against Humanity that's a little more family friendly... Apples to Apples. Depending on who's playing, I take out the politically triggering cards.
    If you want family friendly, check out In a Bind; kids love it as it gets adults to do silly things.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Underd0g View Post



    Lol, don't know if you're talking about Satanic Panic or the nerdiness of DND but yeah, it's gotten a bad rap. To me it's just creative writing and fiction. I remember when Rug Rats was feared that it was going to incite rebellion in toddlers.
    Haha more so just the nerdiness. However, since like Stranger things and that one vampire show used DND, it's actually gotten some attention. People who used to bash on it are giving it a try. Leave it to pop culture to change peoples opinions on things!

  7. #17
    As it happens, I am occasionally DM'ing games of D&D.

    If you plan on doing your own scenario, the D&D Dungeon Master's Guide and D&D Monsters Manual will be your two primary tools of reference. Note that they are more of guidelines than stone-set rules, and you have a very free hand in changing them to fit your setting. While the standard D&D setting is strictly high-fantasy, I've found the rule set just as easy to apply in a Wild West steampunk, period-accurate Viking Age and even a futuristic setting.

    If you are doing a one-off scenario for a single event, letting participants draw pre-made chararacter sheets is probably a better idea over making them from scratch, mainly in the interest of time. Preparing a character sheet can be a surprisingly time-consuming process, especially if you and the other players are still new to the game and don't know what you're doing yet. The optimal party size is 4 people + the DM. Any more than that, and any combat encounters tend to drag out very long, especially if many enemy creatures are involved.

    You would also do well to prepare clearly marked and easily-distinguishable character tokens for both the players and the neutral and hostile NPCs. This is especially important for larger encounters, where poorly-marked tokens can easily get confusing especially for an inexperienced DM. Preparing an effects sheet with pre-determined (by rulebook or by your own discretion) effects for critical fails is also helpful, as you won't have to pause and think how to best punish a player for rolling a crit-fail, and the game quality will also improve as the players will feel more comfortable with the consistency of written effects as opposed to DM's arbitrary decision.

    Keeping encounter size limited, especially if you are new to DMing, is also important. It will make things easier for you, and keep the pace of the game. In my personal experience, there shouldn't be more than 2-3 hostile creatures more than players (i.e., for a party of 3, the maximum number of hostiles in any given encounter should be 6 or less). If you absolutely feel you must overwhelm the players with hordes of enemies, there are rules which allow you create swarms of creatures (such as zombies), which can be controlled as a single entity on the combat map.

    Also, always be ready to improvise. No matter how carefully you craft your scenario and plan for contingencies, players may still decide to do something completely contrary to your expectations (such as becoming revolutionaries to fight for women's rights instead of following your elaborate quest for tracking down the evil chaos wizard seeking to conquer the world). If that happens, you as the DM will just have to play along and improvise as you do.

    From personal experience, players also appreciate including some mini-games in the broader game as a refreshing change, provided it doesn't disturb the pace of the main game. My personal favourite is farkle, since it is fast-paced and readily playable with the available articles (d6 dice).

  8. #18
    When I wrote them for my friends, I would fill the time by having a session filled with:

    4 combats minimum, including one that could kill a character
    Those four combats are a part of the same quest
    The quest has to have two components that are morally grey or of arguable value, to give the players something to discuss. No false choices.
    There has to be one additional side quest for three players, or two for six. These are not just to give something to talk about, but to give players out of the loop something to do, and to engineer an occasional 1v1 combat because players love that.

    No dead end puzzles. Puzzles must lead to side quests or treasure, not main quests.
    No random door monster puzzles. If a door has an enemy that is too powerful, the players must have a reasonable way to gain information about that door.
    Anything that kills a character has to have been written up by the GM before the game started. Enemies brought in organically by play shouldn't be able to permakill players.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Underd0g View Post

    Lol, don't know if you're talking about Satanic Panic or the nerdiness of DND but yeah, it's gotten a bad rap. To me it's just creative writing and fiction. I remember when Rug Rats was feared that it was going to incite rebellion in toddlers.

    "Ammonia will disinfect sin."
    --adrianhayter

    "Art is life, just add bull****."
    --Chris Miller

  10. #20
    I've played a few versions of D&D and a couple other table-top RPGs.

    Regarding therapy, the thing to avoid is something that might touch off problems like PTSD. For instance, if he's knowingly DMing rape victims, he'd be better off avoiding mention of such things. War veterans may have specific experiences to avoid but enjoy combat plenty generally. On the contrary, if someone's afraid of spiders, it might be nice to stick them against huge, icky spiders and help them overcome the fear somewhat in this new powerful avatar and removed from the sight of actual spiders.

    The Lord of the Rings manual is actually really good. It's not based on experience points at all, and players level up according to the story progression (chapters and scenes). There's much less to keep track of for both DMs and players, so especially for people who are into the role and those who are easily intimidated by all the math, rules and Munchkin players, LotR is a fantastic system. Like D&D, it can be adapted to any other genre, world, campaign.

    I've DMed post-apocalyptic sci-fi in D&D, and a Berserk-themed world with LotR rules. Anything's possible once you understand the basics and get comfortable switching things up.
    "Ammonia will disinfect sin."
    --adrianhayter

    "Art is life, just add bull****."
    --Chris Miller

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