How can a character be tricked into thinking something like this? - Page 2


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Thread: How can a character be tricked into thinking something like this?

  1. #11
    Member Sir-KP's Avatar
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    If the villain's character fits, use number 3.

    Nobody expects a gift with colleague's head inside.

  2. #12
    You hopefully have a strong motivation for him being a vigilante. That's probably why they are questioning you. I am not expert but he needs a psychological wound or scar. Or maybe for instance he is worried it can happen to someone he knows. That could be an example of a motive.
    I would follow as in believe in the words of good moral leaders. Rather than the beliefs of oneself.
    The most difficult thing for a writer to comprehend is to experience silence, so speak up. (quoted from a member)

  3. #13
    Oh okay, but I think they are less okay with the villain's motivations rather than the main character. The villains need to be motivated to believe that this has happened, so not sure how to motivate them, to believe something like that.

  4. #14
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    Have you ever finished a story? Or is this still the same screenplay as you were writing 5 years ago?

  5. #15
    It hasn't been that long, but it's the same one. I keep getting negative opinions on it, so I thought I would make it as good as it can be before producing my first feature film. I keep being told to put it away for a while and then look at it again later.

  6. #16
    Member Rogue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ironpony View Post
    It hasn't been that long, but it's the same one. I keep getting negative opinions on it, so I thought I would make it as good as it can be before producing my first feature film. I keep being told to put it away for a while and then look at it again later.
    Putting away a piece and working on something else for a while is generally good advice and it works for more than just writing. I'd like to recommend something along the same lines but with a different approach. Finish writing the story. Don't ask for opinions or even question if this ending or that motive is going to plausibly fit in with the rest of the story. Just put pen to paper, metaphorically speaking and write the story you want to tell. Once that's done, stick it on a shelf.

    This is the part that I think is most important: write something else. It doesn't matter what it is. A collection of poems. A short story or two. A play. These don't have to be things that you will ever publish, professionally or online for your friends to read. These can be things for your eyes only or you can share them with the world. The only point here is to finish them and let them be what they are, imperfections and all. There is a certain sense of relaxation that comes from simply finishing something, at least for me.

    I've found that this can alleviate some of the stress of trying to tell the "perfect story" because such a thing doesn't exist. I've also discovered that it will help me avoid talking my story to death which can occur when I let so many outside influences prevent me from doing the one thing I wanted to from the beginning which was to get this story out of my head because it's not paying rent and I have other tenants who are interested in the space.

    As for the specific questions you had in your original post, I'm not really comfortable offering any advice on that. I just don't know enough about the story or the characters involved. I'm not comfortable with referring to a character as merely MC or Protagonist because the questions you're asking are about characters you want your audience to think of as people and not just tropes or archetypes.

    It's just too impersonal for me to offer anything substantial. I'm afraid I'm all but useless without some sort of finished product in front of me.

    Best of luck to you.
    Last edited by Rogue; October 15th, 2019 at 03:20 PM. Reason: fat fingers

  7. #17
    Oh okay thanks. Well I've put it away quite a few times, but figure I might as well finish it for good. I just brought it out again, after putting it away for a while again. I would say that I am not sure, if the main character would think to cut off the dead officer's head, before the other police arrive at the crime scene.

    He might think to do it, if he is really quick to come up with such an idea, but this is the kind of plan that would require thinking, and not sure that a character would think of something like this very quickly, soon after the officer has been killed. What do you think? Could he?

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by ironpony View Post
    He might think to do it, if he is really quick to come up with such an idea, but this is the kind of plan that would require thinking, and not sure that a character would think of something like this very quickly, soon after the officer has been killed. What do you think? Could he?
    This isn't something you should be asking. You should know what your characters would think/feel better than anyone else in the world. If you don't know such things, then you don't know your characters well enough.

    Which is likely a sign that you're focusing too much on plot and not enough on character development.

    Have you tried writing a simpler screenplay? Perhaps one with less characters? How about a survival story with one main character fighting against the elements? (Or something along those lines?) It doesn't have to be a full 120-page script. You could write a 30-page one, if you like.

    This would be a great exercise for you, a way to hone your storytelling skills without having to juggle multiple motivations and conflicts. You should be able to keep the reader/viewer on the edge of their seat with simple conflicts, before you're ready to handle thick, twisting, convoluted plots.

    Just my two cents.

  9. #19
    Oh yeah, I certainly do not want to be too much about plot and not enough about character. I just want to be able to build into the ending I have though and just not sure how to get there. I don't want to over plot it to get there, just have to find some way of getting there. Yeah I've written simplier scripts before. I guess the reason I've asked the most questions on this one, this is my most challenging one, but also feel it could be the best in terms of a dramatic story.

    As far as knowing the characters, do you ever think you know your characters, but then put the story away, then pull it out again later, and see your characters differently, as if maybe you didn't know them as well as you though, and they end up surprising you?

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by seigfried007 View Post
    Why do these cops need to be vigilantes in the description? Why are vigilante cops more horrible than regular old ticked-off cops hunting for a cop-killer? Regular old cops will shoot them just as dead. They're not kind to cop-killers.

    The public hates these criminals too--and the public might just form vigilante gangs, too! The public is armed, doesn't know or care about protocols and laws, cares about loved ones being serially raped, cares that their safety is in jeopardy. The public is the bigger worry, quite possibly. Anyone who beats the ever loving shite out of these guys is going to be a hero in the public eye--and you guess how many people want that title.
    Actually I was just thinking about what was said here. If regular old cops would just shoot them dead, doesn't that count as vigilantism though?

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