E-books: How much is too much?


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Thread: E-books: How much is too much?

  1. #1

    E-books: How much is too much?

    I'm curious, how much would you (as a reader) be prepared to pay as for an e-book, especially by a new author?


    I found this article interesting
    https://www.thebookdesigner.com/2018...ng-your-ebook/
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  2. #2
    That's a dicey thing.
    The prices have begun to stratify.
    Anything under $3.99 is viewed as Indie pulp.
    $3.99-5.99 is considered marginal territory.
    $5.99-9.99 is for big publishing houses.
    $9.99 and up is jagoffs like James Patterson.


    No, these are not hard and fast rules. Nothing written in stone.
    These are just growing perspectives on the eBook market.
    When people see these prices, this is what they think.
    Even though some big publishing houses sell their books for $4.99, and some Indies sell their books for $8.99 (these are the guys who don't wanna be considered at the other end of the spectrum)


    I tend to sell for the $4.99 range for my average book. That makes it a value since they are usually big books for a midrange price.
    I sold a double-book for $6.99. That paid me roughly $2 profit per book (2x=$4 per copy)
    I have a few old books hat I have marked down to 2 or 3 bucks.

  3. #3
    But you're the writer, Ralph, not the reader (aka not the person buying the e-book) I've bought some excellent books by established authors at 0.99 . these are books which already have 100's of reviews.

    We receive an email from Amazon every day with book offers and we always take advantage.
    Last edited by PiP; June 24th, 2019 at 08:42 PM.
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  4. #4
    If it's an author I know and love... price isn't an issue. If it's a new author and they have been rec'd to me a damn good source: the price isn't an issue. If it's a start-up author I don't know and who hasn't been rec'd to me... usually I enter with caution. If cover art is professional, blurb good, read-me section on Amazon carrying barely any faults, then anywhere from 0.99 up to 7.99 (ebook). I do most of mine between 3.99-7.99, depending on size. I did put one at 0.99 (90k), but that was a thank you to readers for staying with my whilst I got the 2nd editions redone and out. But it's rare I'll pay above what I put my own books out on the market for, to be honest.
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  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by PiP View Post
    I'm curious, how much would you (as a reader) be prepared to pay as for an e-book, especially by a new author?


    I found this article interesting
    https://www.thebookdesigner.com/2018...ng-your-ebook/
    As a reader I would not pay more than $3 or so for any book. That’s because (1) I read a lot, usually finishing a mid size commercial paperback in 2-3 days, so spending the best part of $10 or more on a book adds up fast and (2) There’s no reason to. There is a practically inexhaustible wealth of older, cut price books I have not read not even counting what’s in the public domain - so why the heck would anybody buy a brand new bestseller at $10, $15, sometimes close to $20? Makes no sense. Books don’t expire. This isn’t the Beatles going on tour. Spending big bucks on books for the sake of a momentary trend is silly. Wait a few years and get it cheap.

    I do occasionally splash out on a $10 ebook if I really love the author but I will say right now if I’m buying a book at a price tag I don’t feel it is good enough to deserve, I won’t be spending that kind of money on that author in the future. I don’t go back to restaurants that sell overpriced meals that tastes like Applebees and I won’t spend money on an author who writes mediocre work and prices themselves at X because “that’s what the market is”.

    Of course, as a writer I view it differently.
    "If you don't like my peaches, don't shake my tree."

  6. #6
    I almost never buy fiction except when collecting a series, which virtually by definition means the work of an established author. There are a lot of books out there to read already, so new publications aren't particularly attractive when I can get older ones for free from the public library, which provides both physical books and E-books nowadays, or very cheaply second-hand from charity shops. Any money paid to a charity shop is effectively a donation to the charity as the books usually find their way back to the shop for resale after I've read them.

    When I start reading a novel I read virtually non-stop until it's finished, much to my angel's annoyance, so I can read one in a single day. Bear in mind that a novel may contain little more action than a film and I read in almost real story time, so a novel just equates to an overlong film when read that way. Reading at that speed I can't justify paying for novels and would rather spend any such money on the occasional DVD.

    So far as I can make out the vast majority of E-books are effectively imports to Britain regardless of the nationality of the writer, especially considering that Amazon insists that it doesn't do any trade in or from Britain. (My angel and I both have E-readers that don't accept Amazon E-book format files as we never buy anything from them.) The main self-publishing websites are equally located in the USA, so the E-book industry appears to have almost nothing to do with the UK. It's not surprising when here a paper book doesn't attract VAT but an E-book, so far as I know, still does, being deemed by the government to be "software"! Having spent much of my working life writing software, when I wrote my novel I didn't realise that I still was.

    I may appear mean in my approach to reading but the truth is that I've never read that much fiction at all, so paying for it would be unusual. Equally I made my own novel available for free download on my own website and the only other items that I've written have all appeared in WF to be read for free here, so I work the same both ways. I have also written computer software for a charity for free since I retired.

    Beyond my personal practices, from what I've seen written about pricing E-books, the scale is seriously distorted by factors other than the quality and quantity of the writing, so I can't suggest any sensible figure.
    'Sharing an experience creates a reality.' Create a new reality today.
    'There has to be some give and take.' If I can take my time I'm willing to give it.
    'The most difficult criticism that a writer has to comprehend is silence.' So speak up.

  7. #7
    Like I said: that chart is perception, not fact.
    I see chatter online about what price range people shop in, little things here and there.

    But this is Amazon's official chart on sales prices:



    But this only speaks to profit per book, not necessarily will you sell many books at that rate.

  8. #8

  9. #9
    Like most for me it depends on the author, and anticipation. I rarely buy hardbacks as they are so expensive I will usually wait for the paperback. But I am a sucker for signed copied from my genres.

    It does really annoy me when eBooks are priced the same as paper books, they don't have all of the overheads so they should not cost the same.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by PiP View Post
    But you're the writer, Ralph, not the reader (aka not the person buying the e-book) I've bought some excellent books by established authors at 0.99 . these are books which already have 100's of reviews.

    We receive an email from Amazon every day with book offers and we always take advantage.

    Few of those books started out as 99 cent books.
    They were likely downgraded to help promote the newest book.
    After your book has exhausted it's initial sales arc, you might as well use it to market your new books.

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