Is it possible for a good person to turn truly bad, or not really? - Page 3

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Thread: Is it possible for a good person to turn truly bad, or not really?

  1. #21
    There are online vigilantes 'honey potting' paedophiles. Knife crime is up. Some idiot burned down a house with a disabled person in it as they were convinced he was a paedophile. The big stories mask the smaller stupidities. Not revenge. Justice.

    Quote Originally Posted by ironpony View Post
    Okay thanks, it's just that Western society seems so anti-revenge, cause whenever you read a news story about a killer who slips through the cracks, like say O.J. Simpson for example, there is never any angry mobs who form to take him out or anything like that, and people just believe in the system, and don't want to take revenge it seems.

  2. #22
    Oh okay, well I think my problem is maybe, is that most of these vigilante examples, in real life probably had some deep psychological flaws before they are pushed into being vigilantes, where as I want to make my characters mr. perfect white knite, who was everything going for them, but are corrupted into taking revenge on criminals. So it possible to corrupt a moral white knight who has it all going for them or can only flawed people be corrupted?

  3. #23
    Everyone is corruptible. Just have him dehumanize these detestable scum, who do nothing but destroy the society that so many have built with love and passion, to the point where he sees it as justified to commit these actions. Have him reason his way to where his actions are ultimately for the best, and even though they might be seen as evil he will take that burden for the good of mankind. Have him see himself as this "mr. perfect white knight" who can do nothing wrong, who only acts in the best interests of all, the martyr who will take this heavy burden.

    Or have the criminals take away his life he so much deserves, have them destroy it all for him, leading to a maniacal hatred that is, of course, justified because these men are just that vile... If you want him to be perfect, the best thing I think, is that he also should think he's perfect. And from there the corruption can arise.

    And remember, some flaws are always good, lest you end up with a rather bland character

    Good day, and good luck

    I'd like to think I'm actually a nice person in real life


  4. #24
    When considering good and bad acts it is probably necessary to think in terms of proportionate actions and triggers. A person may have as part of their character a highly disproportionate reaction to a particular trigger but otherwise appear quite normal. Such behaviour may well be regarded as "bad", "good" conversely being acting totally predictably. I myself know that despite my normal demeanour I am very sensitive to the way that people treat my angel. A salesman once virtually directly accused her of lying and, knowing her so well, I could have torn him limb from limb for making such a ludicrous accusation. Certainly the conversation became very heated and he had to back down rapidly. If such a hairspring trigger event doesn't happen in a story until a particular point then the sudden turnaround in a character's behaviour may seem unrealistic to a reader, but it isn't in real life. Real life has little to do with fiction though. Fiction has its own weird rules and conventions. It may seem strange but readers may well criticise a story effectively for being too true to reality. Real life is full of unknown factors and we never get the complete story on why things happen, but in fiction we are seen as being unfair to the readers if we don't disclose everything. They are after all escaping from reality to find security in the artificial world of fiction and will turn against any writer who lets reality intrude on their peace of mind there.

    I describe myself here in WF as an erratic, i.e. it is predictable that I may act unpredictably. If you create a very predictable character then any unpredictable behaviour by that character may well be considered uncharacteristic by the reader. If your character is normally harmlessly unpredictable then it will be more believable that they could take an unpredictably harmful action at some point. In my case an unusually disproportionate defensive act on behalf of my angel by myself might appear uncharacteristic but actually wouldn't be. It would just be another facet of my erraticism. By making it clear to your readers that a character is multi-facetted you open possibilities in the story line that might otherwise seem unlikely.

    In my novel there is a man whom I describe as being either a naturally mild person who has been forced by his life experiences to become macho or conversely a naturally macho man who has tempered his behaviour with mildness. How he will behave when faced with a crisis is therefore evidently unpredictable. That is being fair to the reader.
    Last edited by JustRob; June 17th, 2019 at 01:12 PM.
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  5. #25
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  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by JustRob View Post
    When considering good and bad acts it is probably necessary to think in terms of proportionate actions and triggers. A person may have as part of their character a highly disproportionate reaction to a particular trigger but otherwise appear quite normal. Such behaviour may well be regarded as "bad", "good" conversely being acting totally predictably. I myself know that despite my normal demeanour I am very sensitive to the way that people treat my angel. A salesman once virtually directly accused her of lying and, knowing her so well, I could have torn him limb from limb for making such a ludicrous accusation. Certainly the conversation became very heated and he had to back down rapidly. If such a hairspring trigger event doesn't happen in a story until a particular point then the sudden turnaround in a character's behaviour may seem unrealistic to a reader, but it isn't in real life. Real life has little to do with fiction though. Fiction has its own weird rules and conventions. It may seem strange but readers may well criticise a story effectively for being too true to reality. Real life is full of unknown factors and we never get the complete story on why things happen, but in fiction we are seen as being unfair to the readers if we don't disclose everything. They are after all escaping from reality to find security in the artificial world of fiction and will turn against any writer who lets reality intrude on their peace of mind there.

    I describe myself here in WF as an erratic, i.e. it is predictable that I may act unpredictably. If you create a very predictable character then any unpredictable behaviour by that character may well be considered uncharacteristic by the reader. If your character is normally harmlessly unpredictable then it will be more believable that they could take an unpredictably harmful action at some point. In my case an unusually disproportionate defensive act on behalf of my angel by myself might appear uncharacteristic but actually wouldn't be. It would just be another facet of my erraticism. By making it clear to your readers that a character is multi-facetted you open possibilities in the story line that might otherwise seem unlikely.

    In my novel there is a man whom I describe as being either a naturally mild person who has been forced by his life experiences to become macho or conversely a naturally macho man who has tempered his behaviour with mildness. How he will behave when faced with a crisis is therefore evidently unpredictable. That is being fair to the reader.
    Yeah I can see that, I watched the movie Cruising (1980) not too long ago, and I thought the story had problems throughout, but other people who liked the movie said those things happened that way in the movie because it was based off true events, and I thought well, maybe just because it happened in real life that way, does not mean it would work for fiction, if that's a fair criticism.

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by ironpony View Post
    For my story, I've gotten some feedback and some say that they have trouble buying that a character would be pushed so psycho, so quickly, but it's a screenplay, so it's not a long story by any means. But is possible, or are people just born evil to degree, and no one can actually do a 180 degree turn, unless it's over a long time period, with several pushes along the way

    Is it possible to turn bad but just one big push, in a not so long amount of time?
    I think it's possible. But why not give them a few provocations, that way you have a decent and perhaps more believeable arc.

    If it's a screenplay, you have plenty of time.

  8. #28
    Well I want a group of characters to turn bad, but I want one provocation to do it, if possible cause I don't want to get too excessive with the provocations and thought it would be best to just have one hard one, rather than a few, if possible.

  9. #29
    I would say that anybody can become something else as long as there is logical progression. A good guy who just turns bad isn't as believable as say Walter White who slowly goes from a cowardly teacher scared of guns into the the noughties version of Scarface. Just implement an arc of progessive conflict with the character and we as readers can understand the change.

  10. #30
    Well I don't want it to be as slow as Walter White though. Is it possible for a character to turn bad in a day? For example in The Dark Knight movie, Harvey Dent turns bad and there in a really short amount of time, only a day after the push pretty much.

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