Simultaneous submissions


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Thread: Simultaneous submissions

  1. #1

    Simultaneous submissions

    Just received the following email today regarding a story I submitted back in January.

    Our submission period ends on June 30th, and as soon as we finish
    reading all the submissions, we will read our way through the stories that
    made it through this first tier.

    Once we have all of our "maybes," your story will be compared to the
    others, and the best eight will be selected for final publication.

    Please let us know if you have any problem with this. I hope you don't.

    This is a really entertaining story.

    In any case, congratulations for making it past the first tier!”

    So here’s my question, I actually already have had this story accepted for publication as part of a double-deal with another magazine. I have not yet received the contract nor details as to specifics. Just a “we like this, we will be publishing it, further info to follow” and that was only a couple weeks ago.

    This one pays more and is most prestigious so I would like to publish in there however I have not yet mentioned the other magazine stating they want it. Unsure if they will take it as a reprint and don’t want to ask at this stage for obvious reasons.

    Thoughts? Want to be professional but don’t want to end up jeopardizing acceptance when zero publishing contracts have yet been signed on this story...

    "If you don't like my peaches, don't shake my tree."

    "Perhaps I write for no one. Perhaps for the same person children are writing for when they scrawl their names in the snow."

  2. #2
    That's to say in a lighthearted manner that is a unpredictable and a situation I wouldn't want to be in. In some cases they can blacklist you for simultaneous submissions. Try to tell something such as I couldn't alert you on time, but it was submitted elsewhere.

    Congratulations.

    Make up a lie, it's the only way out is my advice. You can also say submission and waiting periods are difficult for writers in case you need to apologize. Saying it tactfully is probably what you'd want to do.
    I would follow as in believe in the words of good moral leaders. Rather than the beliefs of oneself.
    The most difficult thing for a writer to comprehend is to experience silence, so speak up. (quoted from a member)

  3. #3
    I'd check to see if both accept simultaneous submissions. If they do, it's not an issue because no contract has been signed with either: you're well within your right to go for the best deal of the two, so long as soon as you get a contract from one, you let the other publisher know (or decline the 1st offer and let them know). But ideally you can't sign one contract then also publish with the other as a reprint. Usually, contracts are signed for X amount of time, where you can't republish the story elsewhere until the contract has run out.

    Do you know if both accept simultaneous submissions?
    "You don't wanna ride the bus like this,"

    Mike Posner.



  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Aquilo View Post
    I'd check to see if both accept simultaneous submissions. If they do, it's not an issue because no contract has been signed with either: you're well within your right to go for the best deal of the two, so long as soon as you get a contract from one, you let the other publisher know (or decline the 1st offer and let them know). But ideally you can't sign one contract then also publish with the other as a reprint. Usually, contracts are signed for X amount of time, where you can't republish the story elsewhere until the contract has run out.

    Do you know if both accept simultaneous submissions?
    Yes, they do, it’s just one of those situations where I feel mentioning it now may cause them to look at my work less favorably as it’s less likely to be an exclusive. I would tell them when the contract is received it just hasn’t been yet. I kind of feel like I should not have to pass on opportunities while they take their sweet time figuring it out you know?
    "If you don't like my peaches, don't shake my tree."

    "Perhaps I write for no one. Perhaps for the same person children are writing for when they scrawl their names in the snow."

  5. #5
    When you have 2 buyers then its a problem. Currently you only have a promise, and a 1 in 30 chance of a deal with the 2nd buyer.
    But if the 2nd buyer decides they want it before the first buyer does, then it would be polite to call the first and give them the option.


    But there is the question: which magazine is better?

  6. #6
    Publishing gets you one if two ways: either it moves too slow and you're waiting for things to roll, or it's rushing headlong into contracts, editing, promotion etc. You're almost caught in both at the same time here.

    In all honesty, there's nothing wrong with taking a chance on the anthology if that's the better market. You just need to drop a note to the magazine and let them know you have interest from elsewhere, but nothing's decided yet. It's taking a chance with the anthology, where the worst that can happen is that the anthology doesn't take you on and you're left with that story still in your hands. But, to be honest (again), if you've had interest from two places that want to take it on, you'll have an interest in your story again from other sources. Sometimes it's good to wait for the better option, even if it makes your heart miss a few beats in the process. Your work deserves the best possible placement, though, so don't settle just because you get a yes from one.
    "You don't wanna ride the bus like this,"

    Mike Posner.



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