Recommended Epic Poems/Poets/Collections/Criticsm

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Thread: Recommended Epic Poems/Poets/Collections/Criticsm

  1. #1

    Recommended Epic Poems/Poets/Collections/Criticsm

    Hi there fine WF members! I'm looking to improve my poetry, as it's not where I think it should be, and am looking to read much more poetry. I've compiled a list of poets that I've already read, but I want to expand, expand, expand! I was hoping for some recommendations. I've got Ted Hughes' Complete Poems from the library already on my shelf, but want to REALLY get into it. Also, any poetry books (regarding criticism, structure, etc) would be appreciated. I may have missed a few here, but this is generally where I'm at:

    The List

    Beowulf- Anonymous
    The Song of Roland- Anonymous
    Lawrence Ferlinghetti (1955+)
    Rupi Kaur (Some)
    Sully Prudhomme (Early Collections)
    W.B Yeats (Collected Poems)
    Pablo Neruda (Complete Poems)
    Arthur Rimbaud (Complete Poems)
    William Shakespeare (Complete Works)
    Robert Frost (Complete Poems)
    Dylan Thomas (Complete Poems)
    Percy Shelley (Selected Poems)
    Robert Burns (Collected Poems)
    Andrew Marvell (Complete Poems)
    Wallace Stevens (Collected Poems)
    Lord Byron (Complete Works)
    Alfred Lord Tennyson (Complete Works)
    Horace (Selected Poems)
    Leonard Cohen (3 Collections)
    Dante (The Divine Comedy)
    Ezra Pound (The Cantos)
    E.E Cummings (Complete Poems)
    Homer (The Illiad, The Odyssey)
    Virgin (The Aeneid)
    Allen Ginsberg (Complete Poems)
    Rumi (The Eseential Rumi)
    John Donne (Complete Poems)
    Edmund Spenser (The Faerie Queene)
    David Jones (In Parenthesis)
    Derek Walcott (Collected Poems)
    Wilfred Owen (Complete Poems)
    Petrarch (Complete Poems)
    Robert Browning (Complete Poems)
    Odysseus Elytis (Selected Poems)
    Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (Complete Poems)
    T.S Eliot (Selected Poems (including The Waste Land,) Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats.)
    W.H Auden (Collected Poems)
    Ted Hughes (Collected Poems)
    Last edited by Bard_Daniel; June 8th, 2019 at 12:45 AM.
    ďAs far as we can discern, the sole purpose of human existence is to kindle a light of meaning in the darkness of mere being,"

    -Carl Jung

  2. #2
    I don't know if this helps, but if you want your poetry to rhyme I read that this book tells you what letters on the alphabet are stressed and unstressed. It is important for rhyming. The study of sound when speaking or reading for poetic purposes can go a long way for iambic meter or a trochee. So for example which vowels and consonants are stressed?

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/0817304525...v_ov_lig_dp_it

    The source of this find is a poetry book I bought which I own.
    Last edited by Theglasshouse; June 1st, 2019 at 02:31 PM.
    I would follow as in believe in the words of good moral leaders. Rather than the beliefs of oneself.
    The most difficult thing for a writer to comprehend is to experience silence, so speak up. (quoted from a member)

  3. #3
    BARD -- I can't quite figure out what you're doing or why you're doing it. It would take a LIFETIME to read the list as it is, never mind add to it. Why are you doing this, if I may ask? I took a senior course (one semester) once called Shakespeare's Tragedies. For reasons I won't go into, we started with King Lear. We never got off it: we spent four months on that one play and came nowhere near 'finishing' the conversation. We spent one entire 3-hr class on Lear's warning to Cordelia: "NOTHING WILL COME OF NOTHING!" I learned more about Shakespeare, his era, and the range of tragedy from that one play than I would have from three 'survey' courses (fondly called "bicycle trips through Westminster Abbey").

    I would suggest you take a hard look at WHY you're compiling this formidable list



    ________________________________________________

    "I believe in nothing but the holiness of the heart's affections and the Truth of the imagination". Keats, ​Letters

    "No man is an island entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main . . . any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind. And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls -- it tolls for thee. " John Donne, Meditation XVII

  4. #4
    Sylvia Plath
    John Keats
    Charles Bukowski
    Mark Strand
    Philip Levine
    Billy Collins
    Frederico Lorca
    Tim Bowling
    Peter Meinke
    William Carlos Williams
    Anne Sexton
    Frank O'Hara
    James Dickey
    A. Van Jordan
    Al Purdy
    Don MacKay
    Patrick Lane
    Lorna Crozier
    the list goes on and on

    google 500 best english poems

    Go to Poemhunter.com and poetryinvoice.com and just start reading random poets

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by TL Murphy View Post
    Sylvia Plath
    John Keats
    Charles Bukowski
    Mark Strand
    Philip Levine
    Billy Collins
    Frederico Lorca
    Tim Bowling
    Peter Meinke
    William Carlos Williams
    Anne Sexton
    Frank O'Hara
    James Dickey
    A. Van Jordan
    Al Purdy
    Don MacKay
    Patrick Lane
    Lorna Crozier
    the list goes on and on

    google 500 best english poems

    Go to Poemhunter.com and poetryinvoice.com and just start reading random poets
    Thank you TL Murphy! I just wanted some suggestions and this fit the bill. I will also utilize poemhunter and the google search terms to see if I like the individual poems and then try to gravitate towards poets that I like!
    ďAs far as we can discern, the sole purpose of human existence is to kindle a light of meaning in the darkness of mere being,"

    -Carl Jung

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by clark View Post
    BARD -- I can't quite figure out what you're doing or why you're doing it. It would take a LIFETIME to read the list as it is, never mind add to it. Why are you doing this, if I may ask? I took a senior course (one semester) once called Shakespeare's Tragedies. For reasons I won't go into, we started with King Lear. We never got off it: we spent four months on that one play and came nowhere near 'finishing' the conversation. We spent one entire 3-hr class on Lear's warning to Cordelia: "NOTHING WILL COME OF NOTHING!" I learned more about Shakespeare, his era, and the range of tragedy from that one play than I would have from three 'survey' courses (fondly called "bicycle trips through Westminster Abbey").

    I would suggest you take a hard look at WHY you're compiling this formidable list
    I use LibraryThing to keep records of the books I've read. It makes creating this list as simple as searching up what I've read and then typing it here...
    ďAs far as we can discern, the sole purpose of human existence is to kindle a light of meaning in the darkness of mere being,"

    -Carl Jung

  7. #7
    All my books are in boxes ready to move so I can't give you particular authors and titles, but books about poetry rather than of poetry are better for what you want. Having said that I usually find that the first part is very interesting, and then they run out of things to say and start getting into their particular favourite poems.

    You don't mention Wordsworth, I found him interesting because some seemed really great and other bits very ordinary to say the least, and it was interesting working out why, and what he was aiming for. I find myself thinking the same about Dylan Thomas, 'Why would someone who can write really good stuff also publish this crap? Obviously none of us are great all the time, but if it didn't work why put it out there?' Those 'Why?' moments are great if you want to learn, there are usually many answers.
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